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Chapter 17

  • Anatole went out of the room and returned a few minutes later wearing a fu_oat girt with a silver belt, and a sable cap jauntily set on one side an_ery becoming to his handsome face. Having looked in a mirror, and standin_efore Dolokhov in the same pose he had assumed before it, he lifted a glas_f wine.
  • "Well, good-by, Theodore. Thank you for everything and farewell!" sai_natole. "Well, comrades and friends… " he considered for a moment "… of m_outh, farewell!" he said, turning to Makarin and the others.
  • Though they were all going with him, Anatole evidently wished to mak_omething touching and solemn out of this address to his comrades. He spok_lowly in a loud voice and throwing out his chest slightly swayed one leg.
  • "All take glasses; you too, Balaga. Well, comrades and friends of my youth,
  • we've had our fling and lived and reveled. Eh? And now, when shall we mee_gain? I am going abroad. We have had a good time—now farewell, lads! To ou_ealth! Hurrah!… " he cried, and emptying his glass flung it on the floor.
  • "To your health!" said Balaga who also emptied his glass, and wiped his mout_ith his handkerchief.
  • Makarin embraced Anatole with tears in his eyes.
  • "Ah, Prince, how sorry I am to part from you!
  • "Let's go. Let's go!" cried Anatole.
  • Balaga was about to leave the room.
  • "No, stop!" said Anatole. "Shut the door; we have first to sit down. That'_he way."
  • They shut the door and all sat down.
  • "Now, quick march, lads!" said Anatole, rising.
  • Joseph, his valet, handed him his sabretache and saber, and they all went ou_nto the vestibule.
  • "And where's the fur cloak?" asked Dolokhov. "Hey, Ignatka! Go to Matren_atrevna and ask her for the sable cloak. I have heard what elopements ar_ike," continued Dolokhov with a wink. "Why, she'll rush out more dead tha_live just in the things she is wearing; if you delay at all there'll be tear_nd 'Papa' and 'Mamma,' and she's frozen in a minute and must go back—but yo_rap the fur cloak round her first thing and carry her to the sleigh."
  • The valet brought a woman's fox-lined cloak.
  • "Fool, I told you the sable one! Hey, Matrena, the sable!" he shouted so tha_is voice rang far through the rooms.
  • A handsome, slim, and pale-faced gypsy girl with glittering black eyes an_urly blue-black hair, wearing a red shawl, ran out with a sable mantle on he_rm.
  • "Here, I don't grudge it—take it!" she said, evidently afraid of her maste_nd yet regretful of her cloak.
  • Dolokhov, without answering, took the cloak, threw it over Matrena, an_rapped her up in it.
  • "That's the way," said Dolokhov, "and then so!" and he turned the collar u_ound her head, leaving only a little of the face uncovered. "And then so, d_ou see?" and he pushed Anatole's head forward to meet the gap left by th_ollar, through which Matrena's brilliant smile was seen.
  • "Well, good-by, Matrena," said Anatole, kissing her. "Ah, my revels here ar_ver. Remember me to Steshka. There, good-by! Good-by, Matrena, wish me luck!"
  • "Well, Prince, may God give you great luck!" said Matrena in her gypsy accent.
  • Two troykas were standing before the porch and two young drivers were holdin_he horses. Balaga took his seat in the front one and holding his elbows hig_rranged the reins deliberately. Anatole and Dolokhov got in with him.
  • Makarin, Khvostikov, and a valet seated themselves in the other sleigh.
  • "Well, are you ready?" asked Balaga.
  • "Go!" he cried, twisting the reins round his hands, and the troyka tore dow_he Nikitski Boulevard.
  • "Tproo! Get out of the way! Hi!… Tproo!… " The shouting of Balaga and of th_turdy young fellow seated on the box was all that could be heard. On th_rbat Square the troyka caught against a carriage; something cracked, shout_ere heard, and the troyka flew along the Arbat Street.
  • After taking a turn along the Podnovinski Boulevard, Balaga began to rein in,
  • and turning back drew up at the crossing of the old Konyusheny Street.
  • The young fellow on the box jumped down to hold the horses and Anatole an_olokhov went along the pavement. When they reached the gate Dolokho_histled. The whistle was answered, and a maidservant ran out.
  • "Come into the courtyard or you'll be seen; she'll come out directly," sai_he.
  • Dolokhov stayed by the gate. Anatole followed the maid into the courtyard,
  • turned the corner, and ran up into the porch.
  • He was met by Gabriel, Marya Dmitrievna's gigantic footman.
  • "Come to the mistress, please," said the footman in his deep bass,
  • intercepting any retreat.
  • "To what Mistress? Who are you?" asked Anatole in a breathless whisper.
  • "Kindly step in, my orders are to bring you in."
  • "Kuragin! Come back!" shouted Dolokhov. "Betrayed! Back!"
  • Dolokhov, after Anatole entered, had remained at the wicket gate and wa_truggling with the yard porter who was trying to lock it. With a las_esperate effort Dolokhov pushed the porter aside, and when Anatole ran bac_eized him by the arm, pulled him through the wicket, and ran back with him t_he troyka.