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Chapter 18 Away to the South

  • Dorothy wept bitterly at the passing of her hope to get home to Kansas again;
  • but when she thought it all over she was glad she had not gone up in _alloon. And she also felt sorry at losing Oz, and so did her companions.
  • The Tin Woodman came to her and said:
  • "Truly I should be ungrateful if I failed to mourn for the man who gave me m_ovely heart. I should like to cry a little because Oz is gone, if you wil_indly wipe away my tears, so that I shall not rust."
  • "With pleasure," she answered, and brought a towel at once. Then the Ti_oodman wept for several minutes, and she watched the tears carefully an_iped them away with the towel. When he had finished, he thanked her kindl_nd oiled himself thoroughly with his jeweled oil-can, to guard agains_ishap.
  • The Scarecrow was now the ruler of the Emerald City, and although he was not _izard the people were proud of him. "For," they said, "there is not anothe_ity in all the world that is ruled by a stuffed man." And, so far as the_new, they were quite right.
  • The morning after the balloon had gone up with Oz, the four travelers met i_he Throne Room and talked matters over. The Scarecrow sat in the big thron_nd the others stood respectfully before him.
  • "We are not so unlucky," said the new ruler, "for this Palace and the Emeral_ity belong to us, and we can do just as we please. When I remember that _hort time ago I was up on a pole in a farmer's cornfield, and that now I a_he ruler of this beautiful City, I am quite satisfied with my lot."
  • "I also," said the Tin Woodman, "am well-pleased with my new heart; and,
  • really, that was the only thing I wished in all the world."
  • "For my part, I am content in knowing I am as brave as any beast that eve_ived, if not braver," said the Lion modestly.
  • "If Dorothy would only be contented to live in the Emerald City," continue_he Scarecrow, "we might all be happy together."
  • "But I don't want to live here," cried Dorothy. "I want to go to Kansas, an_ive with Aunt Em and Uncle Henry."
  • "Well, then, what can be done?" inquired the Woodman.
  • The Scarecrow decided to think, and he thought so hard that the pins an_eedles began to stick out of his brains. Finally he said:
  • "Why not call the Winged Monkeys, and ask them to carry you over the desert?"
  • "I never thought of that!" said Dorothy joyfully. "It's just the thing. I'l_o at once for the Golden Cap."
  • When she brought it into the Throne Room she spoke the magic words, and soo_he band of Winged Monkeys flew in through the open window and stood besid_er.
  • "This is the second time you have called us," said the Monkey King, bowin_efore the little girl. "What do you wish?"
  • "I want you to fly with me to Kansas," said Dorothy.
  • But the Monkey King shook his head.
  • "That cannot be done," he said. "We belong to this country alone, and canno_eave it. There has never been a Winged Monkey in Kansas yet, and I suppos_here never will be, for they don't belong there. We shall be glad to serv_ou in any way in our power, but we cannot cross the desert. Good-bye."
  • And with another bow, the Monkey King spread his wings and flew away throug_he window, followed by all his band.
  • Dorothy was ready to cry with disappointment. "I have wasted the charm of th_olden Cap to no purpose," she said, "for the Winged Monkeys cannot help me."
  • "It is certainly too bad!" said the tender-hearted Woodman.
  • The Scarecrow was thinking again, and his head bulged out so horribly tha_orothy feared it would burst.
  • "Let us call in the soldier with the green whiskers," he said, "and ask hi_dvice."
  • So the soldier was summoned and entered the Throne Room timidly, for while O_as alive he never was allowed to come farther than the door.
  • "This little girl," said the Scarecrow to the soldier, "wishes to cross th_esert. How can she do so?"
  • "I cannot tell," answered the soldier, "for nobody has ever crossed th_esert, unless it is Oz himself."
  • "Is there no one who can help me?" asked Dorothy earnestly.
  • "Glinda might," he suggested.
  • "Who is Glinda?" inquired the Scarecrow.
  • "The Witch of the South. She is the most powerful of all the Witches, an_ules over the Quadlings. Besides, her castle stands on the edge of th_esert, so she may know a way to cross it."
  • "Glinda is a Good Witch, isn't she?" asked the child.
  • "The Quadlings think she is good," said the soldier, "and she is kind t_veryone. I have heard that Glinda is a beautiful woman, who knows how to kee_oung in spite of the many years she has lived."
  • "How can I get to her castle?" asked Dorothy.
  • "The road is straight to the South," he answered, "but it is said to be ful_f dangers to travelers. There are wild beasts in the woods, and a race o_ueer men who do not like strangers to cross their country. For this reaso_one of the Quadlings ever come to the Emerald City."
  • The soldier then left them and the Scarecrow said:
  • "It seems, in spite of dangers, that the best thing Dorothy can do is t_ravel to the Land of the South and ask Glinda to help her. For, of course, i_orothy stays here she will never get back to Kansas."
  • "You must have been thinking again," remarked the Tin Woodman.
  • "I have," said the Scarecrow.
  • "I shall go with Dorothy," declared the Lion, "for I am tired of your city an_ong for the woods and the country again. I am really a wild beast, you know.
  • Besides, Dorothy will need someone to protect her."
  • "That is true," agreed the Woodman. "My axe may be of service to her; so _lso will go with her to the Land of the South."
  • "When shall we start?" asked the Scarecrow.
  • "Are you going?" they asked, in surprise.
  • "Certainly. If it wasn't for Dorothy I should never have had brains. Sh_ifted me from the pole in the cornfield and brought me to the Emerald City.
  • So my good luck is all due to her, and I shall never leave her until sh_tarts back to Kansas for good and all."
  • "Thank you," said Dorothy gratefully. "You are all very kind to me. But _hould like to start as soon as possible."
  • "We shall go tomorrow morning," returned the Scarecrow. "So now let us all ge_eady, for it will be a long journey."