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Chapter 12 Ozma and Dorothy

  • In her magnificent palace in the Emerald City, the beautiful girl Ruler of al_he wonderful Land of Oz sat in her dainty boudoir with her friend Princes_orothy beside her. Ozma was studying a roll of manuscript which she had take_rom the Royal Library, while Dorothy worked at her embroidery and at time_tooped to pat a shaggy little black dog that lay at her feet. The littl_og's name was Toto, and he was Dorothy's faithful companion.
  • To judge Ozma of Oz by the standards of our world, you would think her ver_oung — perhaps fourteen or fifteen years of age — yet for years she had rule_he Land of Oz and had never seemed a bit older. Dorothy appeared much younge_han Ozma. She had been a little girl when first she came to the Land of Oz,
  • and she was a little girl still, and would never seem to be a day older whil_he lived in this wonderful fairyland.
  • Oz was not always a fairyland, I am told. Once it was much like other lands,
  • except it was shut in by a dreadful desert of sandy wastes that lay all aroun_t, thus preventing its people from all contact with the rest of the world.
  • Seeing this isolation, the fairy band of Queen Lurline, passing over Oz whil_n a journey, enchanted the country and so made it a Fairyland. And Quee_urline left one of her fairies to rule this enchanted Land of Oz, and the_assed on and forgot all about it.
  • From that moment no one in Oz ever died. Those who were old remained old;
  • those who were young and strong did not change as years passed them by; th_hildren remained children always, and played and romped to their hearts'
  • content, while all the babies lived in their cradles and were tenderly care_or and never grew up. So people in Oz stopped counting how old they were i_ears, for years made no difference in their appearance and could not alte_heir station. They did not get sick, so there were no doctors among them.
  • Accidents might happen to some, on rare occasions, it is true, and while n_ne could die naturally, as other people do, it was possible that one might b_otally destroyed. Such incidents, however, were very unusual, and so seldo_as there anything to worry over that the Oz people were as happy an_ontented as can be.
  • Another strange thing about this fairy Land of Oz was that whoever managed t_nter it from the outside world came under the magic spell of the place an_id not change in appearance as long as they lived there. So Dorothy, who no_ived with Ozma, seemed just the same sweet little girl she had been whe_irst she came to this delightful fairyland.
  • Perhaps all parts of Oz might not be called truly delightful, but it wa_urely delightful in the neighborhood of the Emerald City, where Ozma reigned.
  • Her loving influence was felt for many miles around, but there were places i_he mountains of the Gillikin Country, and the forests of the Quadlin_ountry, and perhaps in far-away parts of the Munchkin and Winkie Countries,
  • where the inhabitants were somewhat rude and uncivilized and had not yet com_nder the spell of Ozma's wise and kindly rule. Also, when Oz first became _airyland, it harbored several witches and magicians and sorcerers an_ecromancers, who were scattered in various parts, but most of these had bee_eprived of their magic powers, and Ozma had issued a royal edict forbiddin_nyone in her dominions to work magic except Glinda the Good and the Wizard o_z. Ozma herself, being a real fairy, knew a lot of magic, but she only use_t to benefit her subjects.
  • This little explanation will help you to understand better the story you ar_eaching, but most of it is already known to those who are familiar with th_z people whose adventures they have followed in other Oz books.
  • Ozma and Dorothy were fast friends and were much together. Everyone in O_oved Dorothy almost as well as they did their lovely Ruler, for the littl_ansas girl's good fortune had not spoiled her or rendered her at all vain.
  • She was just the same brave and true and adventurous child as before she live_n a royal palace and became the chum of the fairy Ozma.
  • In the room in which the two sat — which was one of Ozma's private suite o_partments — hung the famous Magic Picture. This was the source of constan_nterest to little Dorothy. One had but to stand before it and wish to se_hat any person was doing, and at once a scene would flash upon the magi_anvas which showed exactly where that person was, and like our own movin_ictures would reproduce the actions of that person as long as you cared t_atch them. So today, when Dorothy tired of her embroidery, she drew th_urtains from before the Magic Picture and wished to see what her frien_utton Bright was doing. Button Bright, she saw, was playing ball with Ojo,
  • the Munchkin boy, so Dorothy next wished to see what her Aunt Em was doing.
  • The picture showed Aunt Em quietly engaged in darning socks for Uncle Henry,
  • so Dorothy wished to see what her old friend the Tin Woodman was doing.
  • The Tin Woodman was then just leaving his tin castle in the company of th_carecrow and Woot the Wanderer. Dorothy had never seen this boy before, s_he wondered who he was. Also she was curious to know where the three wer_oing, for she noticed Woot's knapsack and guessed they had started on a lon_ourney. She asked Ozma about it, but Ozma did not know.
  • That afternoon Dorothy again saw the travelers in the Magic Picture, but the_ere merely tramping through the country and Dorothy was not much intereste_n them. A couple of days later, however, the girl, being again with Ozma,
  • wished to see her friends, the Scarecrow and the Tin Woodman in the Magi_icture, and on this occasion found them in the great castle of Mrs. Yoop, th_iantess, who was at the time about to transform them. Both Dorothy and Ozm_ow became greatly interested and watched the transformations with indignatio_nd horror.
  • "What a wicked Giantess!" exclaimed Dorothy.
  • "Yes," answered Ozma, "she must be punished for this cruelty to our friends,
  • and to the poor boy who is with them."
  • After this they followed the adventure of the little Brown Bear and the Ti_wl and the Green Monkey with breathless interest, and were delighted whe_hey escaped from Mrs. Yoop. They did not know, then, who the Canary was, bu_ealized it must be the transformation of some person of consequence, whom th_iantess had also enchanted.
  • When, finally, the day came when the adventurers headed south into th_unchkin Country, Dorothy asked anxiously:
  • "Can't something be done for them, Ozma? Can't you change 'em back into thei_wn shapes? They've suffered enough from these dreadful transformations, seem_o me."
  • "I've been studying ways to help them, ever since they were transformed,"
  • replied Ozma. "Mrs. Yoop is now the only yookoohoo in my dominions, and th_ookoohoo magic is very peculiar and hard for others to understand, yet I a_esolved to make the attempt to break these enchantments. I may not succeed,
  • but I shall do the best I can. From the directions our friends are taking, _elieve they are going to pass by Jinjur's Ranch, so if we start now we ma_eet them there. Would you like to go with me, Dorothy?"
  • "Of course," answered the little girl; "I wouldn't miss it for anything."
  • "Then order the Red Wagon," said Ozma of Oz, "and we will start at once."
  • Dorothy ran to do as she was bid, while Ozma went to her Magic Room to mak_eady the things she believed she would need. In half an hour the Red Wago_tood before the grand entrance of the palace, and before it was hitched th_ooden Sawhorse, which was Ozma's favorite steed.
  • This Sawhorse, while made of wood, was very much alive and could trave_wiftly and without tiring. To keep the ends of his wooden legs from wearin_own short, Ozma had shod the Sawhorse with plates of pure gold. His harnes_as studded with brilliant emeralds and other jewels and so, while he himsel_as not at all handsome, his outfit made a splendid appearance.
  • Since the Sawhorse could understand her spoken words, Ozma used no reins t_uide him. She merely told him where to go. When she came from the palace wit_orothy, they both climbed into the Red Wagon and then the little dog, Toto,
  • ran up and asked:
  • "Are you going to leave me behind, Dorothy?" Dorothy looked at Ozma, wh_miled in return and said:
  • "Toto may go with us, if you wish him to."
  • So Dorothy lifted the little dog into the wagon, for, while he could run fast,
  • he could not keep up with the speed of the wonderful Sawhorse.
  • Away they went, over hills and through meadows, covering the ground wit_stonishing speed. It is not surprising, therefore, that the Red Wagon arrive_efore Jinjur's house just as that energetic young lady had finished scrubbin_he Green Monkey and was about to lead him to the caramel patch.