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Chapter 11 Jinjur's Ranch

  • As they followed a path down the blue-grass hillside, the first house that me_he view of the travelers was joyously recognized by the Scarecrow Bear as th_ne inhabited by his friend Jinjur, so they increased their speed and hurrie_oward it.
  • On reaching the place, how ever, they found the house deserted. The front doo_tood open, but no one was inside. In the garden surrounding the house wer_eat rows of bushes bearing cream-puffs and macaroons, some of which wer_till green, but others ripe and ready to eat. Farther back were fields o_aramels, and all the land seemed well cultivated and carefully tended. The_ooked through the fields for the girl farmer, but she was nowhere to be seen.
  • "Well," finally remarked the little Brown Bear, "let us go into the house an_ake ourselves at home. That will be sure to please my friend Jinjur, wh_appens to be away from home just now. When she returns, she will be greatl_urprised."
  • "Would she care if I ate some of those ripe cream-puffs?" asked the Gree_onkey.
  • "No, indeed; Jinjur is very generous. Help yourself to all you want," said th_carecrow Bear.
  • So Woot gathered a lot of the cream-puffs that were golden yellow and fille_ith a sweet, creamy substance, and ate until his hunger was satisfied. The_e entered the house with his friends and sat in a rocking-chair — just as h_as accustomed to do when a boy. The Canary perched herself upon the mante_nd daintily plumed her feathers; the Tin Owl sat on the back of anothe_hair; the Scarecrow squatted on his hairy haunches in the middle of the room.
  • "I believe I remember the girl Jinjur," remarked the Canary, in her swee_oice. "She cannot help us very much, except to direct us on our way t_linda's castle, for she does not understand magic. But she's a good girl, honest and sensible, and I'll be glad to see her."
  • "All our troubles," said the Owl with a deep sigh, "arose from my foolis_esolve to seek Nimmie Amee and make her Empress of the Winkies, and while _ish to reproach no one, I must say that it was Woot the Wanderer who put th_otion into my head."
  • "Well, for my part, I am glad he did," responded the Canary. "Your journe_esulted in saving me from the Giantess, and had you not traveled to the Yoo_alley, I would still be Mrs. Yoop's prisoner. It is much nicer to be free, even though I still bear the enchanted form of a Canary-Bird."
  • "Do you think we shall ever be able to get our proper forms back again?" aske_he Green Monkey earnestly.
  • Polychrome did not make reply at once to this important question, but after _eriod of thoughtfulness she said:
  • "I have been taught to believe that there is an antidote for every magi_harm, yet Mrs. Yoop insists that no power can alter her transformations. _ealize that my own fairy magic cannot do it, although I have thought that w_ky Fairies have more power than is accorded to Earth Fairies. The yookooho_agic is admitted to be very strange in its workings and different from th_agic usually practiced, but perhaps Glinda or Ozma may understand it bette_han I. In them lies our only hope. Unless they can help us, we must remai_orever as we are."
  • "A Canary-Bird on a Rainbow wouldn't be so bad," asserted the Tin Owl, winkin_nd blinking with his round tin eyes, "so if you can manage to find you_ainbow again you need have little to worry about."
  • "That's nonsense, Friend Chopper," exclaimed Woot. "I know just how Polychrom_eels. A beautiful girl is much superior to a little yellow bird, and a boy — such as I was — far better than a Green Monkey. Neither of us can be happ_gain unless we recover our rightful forms."
  • "I feel the same way," announced the stuffed Bear. "What do you suppose m_riend the Patchwork Girl would think of me, if she saw me wearing thi_eastly shape?"
  • "She'd laugh till she cried," admitted the Tin Owl. "For my part, I'll have t_ive up the notion of marrying Nimmie Amee, but I'll try not to let that mak_e unhappy. If it's my duty, I'd like to do my duty, but if magic prevents m_etting married I'll flutter along all by myself and be just as contented."
  • Their serious misfortunes made them all silent for a time, and as thei_houghts were busy in dwelling upon the evils with which fate had burdene_hem, none noticed that Jinjur had suddenly appeared in the doorway and wa_ooking at them in astonishment. The next moment her astonishment changed t_nger, for there, in her best rocking-chair, sat a Green Monkey. A great shin_wl perched upon another chair and a Brown Bear squatted upon her parlor rug.
  • Jinjur did not notice the Canary, but she caught up a broomstick and dashe_nto the room, shouting as she came:
  • "Get out of here, you wild creatures! How dare you enter my house?"
  • With a blow of her broom she knocked the Brown Bear over, and the Tin Ow_ried to fly out of her reach and made a great clatter with his tin wings. Th_reen Monkey was so startled by the sudden attack that he sprang into th_ireplace — where there was fortunately no fire — and tried to escape b_limbing up the chimney. But he found the opening too small, and so was force_o drop down again. Then he crouched trembling in the fireplace, his prett_reen hair all blackened with soot and covered with ashes. From this positio_oot watched to see what would happen next.
  • "Stop, Jinjur — stop!" cried the Brown Bear, when the broom again threatene_im. "Don't you know me? I'm your old friend the Scarecrow?"
  • "You're trying to deceive me, you naughty beast! I can see plainly that yo_re a bear, and a mighty poor specimen of a bear, too," retorted the girl.
  • "That's because I'm not properly stuffed," he assured her. "When Mrs. Yoo_ransformed me, she didn't realize I should have more stuffing."
  • "Who is Mrs. Yoop?" inquired Jinjur, pausing with the broom still upraised.
  • "A Giantess in the Gillikin Country."
  • "Oh; I begin to understand. And Mrs. Yoop transformed you? You are really th_amous Scarecrow of Oz."
  • "I was, Jinjur. Just now I'm as you see me — a miserable little Brown Bea_ith a poor quality of stuffing. That Tin Owl is none other than our dear Ti_oodman — Nick Chopper, the Emperor of the Winkies — while this Green Monke_s a nice little boy we recently became acquainted with, Woot the Wanderer."
  • "And I," said the Canary, flying close to Jinjur, "am Polychrome, the Daughte_f the Rainbow, in the form of a bird."
  • "Goodness me!" cried Jinjur, amazed; "that Giantess must be a powerfu_orceress, and as wicked as she is powerful."
  • "She's a yookoohoo," said Polychrome. "Fortunately, we managed to escape fro_er castle, and we are now on our way to Glinda the Good to see if sh_ossesses the power to restore us to our former shapes."
  • "Then I must beg your pardons; all of you must forgive me," said Jinjur, putting away the broom. "I took you to be a lot of wild, unmannerly animals, as was quite natural. You are very welcome to my home and I'm sorry I haven'_he power to help you out of your troubles. Please use my house and all that _ave, as if it were your own."
  • At this declaration of peace, the Bear got upon his feet and the Owl resume_is perch upon the chair and the Monkey crept out of the fireplace. Jinju_ooked at Woot critically, and scowled.
  • "For a Green Monkey," said she, "you're the blackest creature I ever saw. An_ou'll get my nice clean room all dirty with soot and ashes. Whateve_ossessed you to jump up the chimney?"
  • "I — I was scared," explained Woot, somewhat ashamed.
  • "Well, you need renovating, and that's what will happen to you, right away.
  • Come with me!" she commanded.
  • "What are you going to do?" asked Woot.
  • "Give you a good scrubbing," said Jinjur.
  • Now, neither boys nor monkeys relish being scrubbed, so Woot shrank away fro_he energetic girl, trembling fearfully. But Jinjur grabbed him by his paw an_ragged him out to the back yard, where, in spite of his whines and struggles, she plunged him into a tub of cold water and began to scrub him with a stif_rush and a cake of yellow soap.
  • This was the hardest trial that Woot had endured since he became a monkey, bu_o protest had any influence with Jinjur, who lathered and scrubbed him in _usiness-like manner and afterward dried him with a coarse towel.
  • The Bear and the Owl gravely watched this operation and nodded approval whe_oot's silky green fur shone clear and bright in the afternoon sun. The Canar_eemed much amused and laughed a silvery ripple of laughter as she said:
  • "Very well done, my good Jinjur; I admire your energy and judgment. But I ha_o idea a monkey could look so comical as this monkey did while he was bein_athed."
  • "I'm not a monkey!" declared Woot, resentfully; "I'm just a boy in a monkey'_hape, that's all."
  • "If you can explain to me the difference," said Jinjur, "I'll agree not t_ash you again — that is, unless you foolishly get into the fireplace. Al_ersons are usually judged by the shapes in which they appear to the eyes o_thers. Look at me, Woot; what am I?"
  • Woot looked at her.
  • "You're as pretty a girl as I've ever seen," he replied.
  • Jinjur frowned. That is, she tried hard to frown.
  • "Come out into the garden with me," she said, "and I'll give you some of th_ost delicious caramels you ever ate. They're a new variety, that no one ca_row but me, and they have a heliotrope flavor."