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Chapter 5

  • Days became weeks, and weeks became months, and the months followed on_nother in a lazy procession of hot, humid days and warm, humid nights. Th_ugitives saw never a Wieroo by day though often at night they heard th_elancholy flapping of giant wings far above them.
  • Each day was much like its predecessor. Bradley splashed about for a fe_inutes in the cold pool early each morning and after a time the girl tried i_nd liked it. Toward the center it was deep enough for swimming, and so h_aught her to swim—she was probably the first human being in all Caspak’s lon_ges who had done this thing. And then while she prepared breakfast, the ma_haved—this he never neglected. At first it was a source of wonderment to th_irl, for the Galu men are beardless.
  • When they needed meat, he hunted, otherwise he busied himself in improvin_heir shelter, making new and better weapons, perfecting his knowledge of th_irl’s language and teaching her to speak and to write English—anything tha_ould keep them both occupied. He still sought new plans for escape, but wit_ver-lessening enthusiasm, since each new scheme presented some insurmountabl_bstacle.
  • And then one day as a bolt out of a clear sky came that which blasted th_eace and security of their sanctuary forever. Bradley was just emerging fro_he water after his morning plunge when from overhead came the sound o_lapping wings. Glancing quickly up the man saw a white-robed Wieroo circlin_lowly above him. That he had been discovered he could not doubt since th_reature even dropped to a lower altitude as though to assure itself that wha_t saw was a man. Then it rose rapidly and winged away toward the city.
  • For two days Bradley and the girl lived in a constant state of apprehension, awaiting the moment when the hunters would come for them; but nothing happene_ntil just after dawn of the third day, when the flapping of wings apprise_hem of the approach of Wieroos. Together they went to the edge of the woo_nd looked up to see five red-robed creatures dropping slowly in ever- lessening spirals toward their little amphitheater. With no attempt a_oncealment they came, sure of their ability to overwhelm these two fugitives, and with the fullest measure of self-confidence they landed in the clearin_ut a few yards from the man and the girl.
  • Following a plan already discussed Bradley and the girl retreated slowly int_he woods. The Wieroos advanced, calling upon them to give themselves up; bu_he quarry made no reply. Farther and farther into the little wood Bradley le_he hunters, permitting them to approach ever closer; then he circled bac_gain toward the clearing, evidently to the great delight of the Wieroos, wh_ow followed more leisurely, awaiting the moment when they should be beyon_he trees and able to use their wings. They had opened into semicircula_ormation now with the evident intention of cutting the two off from returnin_nto the wood. Each Wieroo advanced with his curved blade ready in his hand, each hideous face blank and expressionless.
  • It was then that Bradley opened fire with his pistol—three shots, aimed wit_areful deliberation, for it had been long since he had used the weapon, an_e could not afford to chance wasting ammunition on misses. At each shot _ieroo dropped; and then the remaining two sought escape by flight, screamin_nd wailing after the manner of their kind. When a Wieroo runs, his wing_pread almost without any volition upon his part, since from time immemoria_e has always used them to balance himself and accelerate his running speed s_hat in the open they appear to skim the surface of the ground when in the ac_f running. But here in the woods, among the close-set boles, the spreading o_heir wings proved their undoing—it hindered and stopped them and threw the_o the ground, and then Bradley was upon them threatening them with instan_eath if they did not surrender— promising them their freedom if they did hi_idding.
  • “As you have seen,” he cried, “I can kill you when I wish and at a distance.
  • You cannot escape me. Your only hope of life lies in obedience. Quick, or _ill!”
  • The Wieroos stopped and faced him. “What do you want of us?” asked one.
  • “Throw aside your weapons,” Bradley commanded. After a moment’s hesitatio_hey obeyed.
  • “Now approach!” A great plan—the only plan—had suddenly come to him like a_nspiration.
  • The Wieroos came closer and halted at his command. Bradley turned to the girl.
  • “There is rope in the shelter,” he said. “Fetch it!”
  • She did as he bid, and then he directed her to fasten one end of a fifty-foo_ength to the ankle of one of the Wieroos and the opposite end to the second.
  • The creatures gave evidence of great fear, but they dared not attempt t_revent the act.
  • “Now go out into the clearing,” said Bradley, “and remember that I am walkin_lose behind and that I will shoot the nearer one should either attempt t_scape—that will hold the other until I can kill him as well.”
  • In the open he halted them. “The girl will get upon the back of the one i_ront,” announced the Englishman. “I will mount the other. She carries a shar_lade, and I carry this weapon that you know kills easily at a distance. I_ou disobey in the slightest, the instructions that I am about to give you, you shall both die. That we must die with you, will not deter us. If you obey, I promise to set you free without harming you.
  • “You will carry us due west, depositing us upon the shore of the mainland—tha_s all. It is the price of your lives. Do you agree?”
  • Sullenly the Wieroos acquiesced. Bradley examined the knots that held the rop_o their ankles, and feeling them secure directed the girl to mount the bac_f the leading Wieroo, himself upon the other. Then he gave the signal for th_wo to rise together. With loud flapping of the powerful wings the creature_ook to the air, circling once before they topped the trees upon the hill an_hen taking a course due west out over the waters of the sea.
  • Nowhere about them could Bradley see signs of other Wieroos, nor of thos_ther menaces which he had feared might bring disaster to his plans fo_scape—the huge, winged reptilia that are so numerous above the southern area_f Caspak and which are often seen, though in lesser numbers, farther north.
  • Nearer and nearer loomed the mainland—a broad, parklike expanse stretchin_nland to the foot of a low plateau spread out before them. The little dots i_he foreground became grazing herds of deer and antelope and bos; a hug_oolly rhinoceros wallowed in a mudhole to the right, and beyond, a might_ammoth culled the tender shoots from a tall tree. The roars and screams an_rowls of giant carnivora came faintly to their ears. Ah, this was Caspak.
  • With all of its dangers and its primal savagery it brought a fullness to th_hroat of the Englishman as to one who sees and hears the familiar sights an_ounds of home after a long absence. Then the Wieroos dropped swiftly downwar_o the flower-starred turf that grew almost to the water’s edge, the fugitive_lipped from their backs, and Bradley told the red-robed creatures they wer_ree to go.
  • When he had cut the ropes from their ankles they rose with that uncann_ailing upon their lips that always brought a shudder to the Englishman, an_pon dismal wings they flapped away toward frightful Oo-oh.
  • When the creatures had gone, the girl turned toward Bradley. “Why did you hav_hem bring us here?” she asked. “Now we are far from my country. We may neve_ive to reach it, as we are among enemies who, while not so horrible will kil_s just as surely as would the Wieroos should they capture us, and we hav_efore us many marches through lands filled with savage beasts.”
  • “There were two reasons,” replied Bradley. “You told me that there are tw_ieroo cities at the eastern end of the island. To have passed near either o_hem might have been to have brought about our heads hundreds of the creature_rom whom we could not possibly have escaped. Again, my friends must be nea_his spot— it cannot be over two marches to the fort of which I have told you.
  • It is my duty to return to them. If they still live we shall find a way t_eturn you to your people.”
  • “And you?” asked the girl.
  • “I escaped from Oo-oh,” replied Bradley. “I have accomplished the impossibl_nce, and so I shall accomplish it again—I shall escape from Caspak.”
  • He was not looking at her face as he answered her, and so he did not see th_hadow of sorrow that crossed her countenance. When he raised his eyes again, she was smiling.
  • “What you wish, I wish,” said the girl.
  • Southward along the coast they made their way following the beach, where th_alking was best, but always keeping close enough to trees to insure sanctuar_rom the beasts and reptiles that so often menaced them. It was late in th_fternoon when the girl suddenly seized Bradley’s arm and pointed straigh_head along the shore. “What is that?” she whispered. “What strange reptile i_t?”
  • Bradley looked in the direction her slim forefinger indicated. He rubbed hi_yes and looked again, and then he seized her wrist and drew her quickl_ehind a clump of bushes.
  • “What is it?” she asked.
  • “It is the most frightful reptile that the waters of the world have eve_nown,” he replied. “It is a German U-boat!”
  • An expression of amazement and understanding lighted her features. “It is th_hing of which you told me,” she exclaimed, “—the thing that swims under th_ater and carries men in its belly!”
  • “It is,” replied Bradley.
  • “Then why do you hide from it?” asked the girl. “You said that now it belonge_o your friends.”
  • “Many months have passed since I knew what was going on among my friends,” h_eplied. “I cannot know what has befallen them. They should have been gon_rom here in this vessel long since, and so I cannot understand why it i_till here. I am going to investigate first before I show myself. When I left, there were more Germans on the U-33 than there were men of my own party at th_ort, and I have had sufficient experience of Germans to know that they wil_ear watching—if they have not been properly watched since I left.”
  • Making their way through a fringe of wood that grew a few yards inland the tw_rept unseen toward the U-boat which lay moored to the shore at a point whic_radley now recognized as being near the oil-pool north of Dinosaur. As clos_s possible to the vessel they halted, crouching low among the dens_egetation, and watched the boat for signs of human life about it. The hatche_ere closed—no one could be seen or heard. For five minutes Bradley watched, and then he determined to board the submarine and investigate. He had risen t_arry his decision into effect when there suddenly broke upon his ear, uttere_n loud and menacing tones, a volley of German oaths and expletives amon_hich he heard Englische schweinhunde repeated several times. The voice di_ot come from the direction of the U-boat; but from inland. Creeping forwar_radley reached a spot where, through the creepers hanging from the trees, h_ould see a party of men coming down toward the shore.
  • He saw Baron Friedrich von Schoenvorts and six of his men—all armed—whil_arching in a little knot among them were Olson, Brady, Sinclair, Wilson, an_hitely.
  • Bradley knew nothing of the disappearance of Bowen Tyler and Miss La Rue, no_f the perfidy of the Germans in shelling the fort and attempting to escape i_he U-33; but he was in no way surprised at what he saw before him.
  • The little party came slowly onward, the prisoners staggering beneath heav_ans of oil, while Schwartz, one of the German noncommissioned officers curse_nd beat them with a stick of wood, impartially. Von Schoenvorts walked in th_ear of the column, encouraging Schwartz and laughing at the discomfiture o_he Britishers. Dietz, Heinz, and Klatz also seemed to enjoy the entertainmen_mmensely; but two of the men—Plesser and Hindle— marched with eyes straigh_o the front and with scowling faces.
  • Bradley felt his blood boil at sight of the cowardly indignities being heape_pon his men, and in the brief span of time occupied by the column to com_breast of where he lay hidden he made his plans, foolhardy though he kne_hem. Then he drew the girl close to him. “Stay here,” he whispered. “I a_oing out to fight those beasts; but I shall be killed. Do not let them se_ou. Do not let them take you alive. They are more cruel, more cowardly, mor_estial than the Wieroos.”
  • The girl pressed close to him, her face very white. “Go, if that is right,” she whispered; “but if you die, I shall die, for I cannot live without you.” He looked sharply into her eyes. “Oh!” he ejaculated. “What an idiot I hav_een! Nor could I live without you, little girl.” And he drew her very clos_nd kissed her lips. “Good-bye.” He disengaged himself from her arms an_ooked again in time to see that the rear of the column had just passed him.
  • Then he rose and leaped quickly and silently from the jungle.
  • Suddenly von Schoenvorts felt an arm thrown about his neck and his pisto_erked from its holster. He gave a cry of fright and warning, and his me_urned to see a half-naked white man holding their leader securely from behin_nd aiming a pistol at them over his shoulder.
  • “Drop those guns!” came in short, sharp syllables and perfect German from th_ips of the newcomer. “Drop them or I’ll put a bullet through the back of vo_choenvorts’ head.”
  • The Germans hesitated for a moment, looking first toward von Schoenvorts an_hen to Schwartz, who was evidently second in command, for orders.
  • “It’s the English pig, Bradley,” shouted the latter, “and he’s alone—go an_et him!”
  • “Go yourself,” growled Plesser. Hindle moved close to the side of Plesser an_hispered something to him. The latter nodded. Suddenly von Schoenvort_heeled about and seized Bradley’s pistol arm with both hands, “Now!” h_houted. “Come and take him, quick!”
  • Schwartz and three others leaped forward; but Plesser and Hindle held back, looking questioningly toward the English prisoners. Then Plesser spoke. “No_s your chance, Englander,” he called in low tones. “Seize Hindle and me an_ake our guns from us—we will not fight hard.”
  • Olson and Brady were not long in acting upon the suggestion. They had see_nough of the brutal treatment von Schoenvorts accorded his men and th_specially venomous attentions he had taken great enjoyment in accordin_lesser and Hindle to understand that these two might be sincere in a desir_or revenge. In another moment the two Germans were unarmed and Olson an_rady were running to the support of Bradley; but already it seemed too late.
  • Von Schoenvorts had managed to drag the Englishman around so that his back wa_oward Schwartz and the other advancing Germans. Schwartz was almost upo_radley with gun clubbed and ready to smash down upon the Englishman’s skull.
  • Brady and Olson were charging the Germans in the rear with Wilson, Whitely, and Sinclair supporting them with bare fists. It seemed that Bradley wa_oomed when, apparently out of space, an arrow whizzed, striking Schwartz i_he side, passing half-way through his body to crumple him to earth. With _hriek the man fell, and at the same time Olson and Brady saw the slim figur_f a young girl standing at the edge of the jungle coolly fitting anothe_rrow to her bow.
  • Bradley had now succeeded in wrestling his arm free from von Schoenvorts’ gri_nd in dropping the latter with a blow from the butt of his pistol. The res_f the English and Germans were engaged in a hand-to-hand encounter. Plesse_nd Hindle standing aside from the melee and urging their comrades t_urrender and join with the English against the tyranny of von Schoenvorts.
  • Heinz and Klatz, possibly influenced by their exhortation, were putting up bu_ half-hearted resistance; but Dietz, a huge, bearded, bull-necked Prussian, yelling like a maniac, sought to exterminate the Englische schweinhunde wit_is bayonet, fearing to fire his piece lest he kill some of his comrades.
  • It was Olson who engaged him, and though unused to the long German rifle an_ayonet, he met the bull-rush of the Hun with the cold, cruel precision an_cience of English bayonet-fighting. There was no feinting, no retiring and n_arrying that was not also an attack. Bayonet-fighting today is not a prett_hing to see—it is not an artistic fencing-match in which men give and take—i_s slaughter inevitable and quickly over.
  • Dietz lunged once madly at Olson’s throat. A short point, with just a twist o_he bayonet to the left sent the sharp blade over the Englishman’s lef_houlder. Instantly he stepped close in, dropped his rifle through his hand_nd grasped it with both hands close below the muzzle and with a short, shar_ab sent his blade up beneath Dietz’s chin to the brain. So quickly was th_hing done and so quick the withdrawal that Olson had wheeled to take o_nother adversary before the German’s corpse had toppled to the ground.
  • But there were no more adversaries to take on. Heinz and Klatz had thrown dow_heir rifles and with hands above their heads were crying “Kamerad! Kamerad!” at the tops of their voices. Von Schoenvorts still lay where he had fallen.
  • Plesser and Hindle were explaining to Bradley that they were glad of th_utcome of the fight, as they could no longer endure the brutality of th_-boat commander.
  • The remainder of the men were looking at the girl who now advanced slowly, he_ow ready, when Bradley turned toward her and held out his hand.
  • “Co-Tan,” he said, “unstring your bow—these are my friends, and yours.” And t_he Englishmen: “This is Co-Tan. You who saw her save me from Schwartz know _art of what I owe her.”
  • The rough men gathered about the girl, and when she spoke to them in broke_nglish, with a smile upon her lips enhancing the charm of her irresistibl_ccent, each and every one of them promptly fell in love with her an_onstituted himself henceforth her guardian and her slave.
  • A moment later the attention of each was called to Plesser by a volley o_nvective. They turned in time to see the man running toward von Schoenvort_ho was just rising from the ground. Plesser carried a rifle with bayone_ixed, that he had snatched from the side of Dietz’s corpse. Von Schoenvorts’ face was livid with fear, his jaws working as though he would call for help; but no sound came from his blue lips.
  • “You struck me,” shrieked Plesser. “Once, twice, three times, you struck me, pig. You murdered Schwerke—you drove him insane by your cruelty until he too_is own life. You are only one of your kind—they are all like you from th_aiser down. I wish that you were the Kaiser. Thus would I do!” And he lunge_is bayonet through von Schoenvorts’ chest. Then he let his rifle fall wit_he dying man and wheeled toward Bradley. “Here I am,” he said. “Do with me a_ou like. All my life I have been kicked and cuffed by such as that, and ye_lways have I gone out when they commanded, singing, to give up my life i_eed be to keep them in power. Only lately have I come to know what a fool _ave been. But now I am no longer a fool, and besides, I am avenged an_chwerke is avenged, so you can kill me if you wish. Here I am.”
  • “If I was after bein’ the king,” said Olson, “I’d pin the V.C. on your nobl_hist; but bein’ only an Irishman with a Swede name, for which God forgive me, the bist I can do is shake your hand.”
  • “You will not be punished,” said Bradley. “There are four of you left—if yo_our want to come along and work with us, we will take you; but you will com_s prisoners.”
  • “It suits me,” said Plesser. “Now that the captain-lieutenant is dead you nee_ot fear us. All our lives we have known nothing but to obey his class. If _ad not killed him, I suppose I would be fool enough to obey him again; but h_s dead. Now we will obey you—we must obey some one.”
  • “And you?” Bradley turned to the other survivors of the original crew of th_-33. Each promised obedience.
  • The two dead Germans were buried in a single grave, and then the party boarde_he submarine and stowed away the oil.
  • Here Bradley told the men what had befallen him since the night of Septembe_4th when he had disappeared so mysteriously from the camp upon the plateau.
  • Now he learned for the first time that Bowen J. Tyler, Jr., and Miss La Ru_ad been missing even longer than he and that no faintest trace of them ha_een discovered.
  • Olson told him of how the Germans had returned and waited in ambush for the_utside the fort, capturing them that they might be used to assist in the wor_f refining the oil and later in manning the U-33, and Plesser told briefly o_he experiences of the German crew under von Schoenvorts since they ha_scaped from Caspak months before—of how they lost their bearings after havin_een shelled by ships they had attempted to sneak farther north and how a_ast with provisions gone and fuel almost exhausted they had sought and a_ast found, more by accident than design, the mysterious island they had onc_een so glad to leave behind.
  • “Now,” announced Bradley, “we’ll plan for the future. The boat has fuel, provisions and water for a month, I believe you said, Plesser; there are te_f us to man it. We have a last sad duty here—we must search for Miss La Ru_nd Mr. Tyler. I say a sad duty because we know that we shall not find them; but it is none the less our duty to comb the shoreline, firing signal shell_t intervals, that we at least may leave at last with full knowledge that w_ave done all that men might do to locate them.”
  • None dissented from this conviction, nor was there a voice raised in protes_gainst the plan to at least make assurance doubly sure before quitting Caspa_orever.
  • And so they started, cruising slowly up the coast and firing an occasiona_hot from the gun. Often the vessel was brought to a stop, and always ther_ere anxious eyes scanning the shore for an answering signal. Late in th_fternoon they caught sight of a number of Band-lu warriors; but when th_essel approached the shore and the natives realized that human beings stoo_pon the back of the strange monster of the sea, they fled in terror befor_radley could come within hailing distance.
  • That night they dropped anchor at the mouth of a sluggish stream whose war_aters swarmed with millions of tiny tadpolelike organisms—minute human spaw_tarting on their precarious journey from some inland pool toward “th_eginning”—a journey which one in millions, perhaps, might survive t_omplete. Already almost at the inception of life they were being greeted b_housands of voracious mouths as fish and reptiles of many kinds fought t_evour them, the while other and larger creatures pursued the devourers, t_e, in turn, preyed upon by some other of the countless forms that inhabit th_eeps of Caprona’s frightful sea.
  • The second day was practically a repetition of the first. They moved ver_lowly with frequent stops and once they landed in the Kro-lu country to hunt.
  • Here they were attacked by the bow-and-arrow men, whom they could not persuad_o palaver with them. So belligerent were the natives that it became necessar_o fire into them in order to escape their persistent and ferociou_ttentions.
  • “What chance,” asked Bradley, as they were returning to the boat with thei_ame, “could Tyler and Miss La Rue have had among such as these?”
  • But they continued on their fruitless quest, and the third day, after cruisin_long the shore of a deep inlet, they passed a line of lofty cliffs tha_ormed the southern shore of the inlet and rounded a sharp promontory abou_oon. Co-Tan and Bradley were on deck alone, and as the new shoreline appeare_eyond the point, the girl gave an exclamation of joy and seized the man’_and in hers.
  • “Oh, look!” she cried. “The Galu country! The Galu country! It is my countr_hat I never thought to see again.”
  • “You are glad to come again, Co-Tan?” asked Bradley.
  • “Oh, so glad!” she cried. “And you will come with me to my people? We may liv_ere among them, and you will be a great warrior—oh, when Jor dies you ma_ven be chief, for there is none so mighty as my warrior. You will come?”
  • Bradley shook his head. “I cannot, little Co-Tan,” he answered. “My countr_eeds me, and I must go back. Maybe someday I shall return. You will no_orget me, Co-Tan?”
  • She looked at him in wide-eyed wonder. “You are going away from me?” she aske_n a very small voice. “You are going away from Co-Tan?”
  • Bradley looked down upon the little bowed head. He felt the soft cheek agains_is bare arm; and he felt something else there too— hot drops of moisture tha_an down to his very finger-tips and splashed, but each one wrung from _oman’s heart.
  • He bent low and raised the tear-stained face to his own. “No, Co-Tan,” h_aid, “I am not going away from you—for you are going with me. You are goin_ack to my own country to be my wife. Tell me that you will, Co-Tan.” And h_ent still lower yet from his height and kissed her lips. Nor did he need mor_han the wonderful new light in her eyes to tell him that she would go to th_nd of the world with him if he would but take her. And then the gun-crew cam_p from below again to fire a signal shot, and the two were brought down fro_he high heaven of their new happiness to the scarred and weather-beaten dec_f the U-33.
  • An hour later the vessel was running close in by a shore of wondrous beaut_eside a parklike meadow that stretched back a mile inland to the foot of _lateau when Whitely called attention to a score of figures clamberin_ownward from the elevation to the lowland below. The engines were reverse_nd the boat brought to a stop while all hands gathered on deck to watch th_ittle party coming toward them across the meadow.
  • “They are Galus,” cried Co-Tan; “they are my own people. Let me speak to the_est they think we come to fight them. Put me ashore, my man, and I will g_eet them.”
  • The nose of the U-boat was run close in to the steep bank; but when Co-Ta_ould have run forward alone, Bradley seized her hand and held her back. “_ill go with you, Co-Tan,” he said; and together they advanced to meet th_ncoming party.
  • There were about twenty warriors moving forward in a thin line, as ou_nfantry advance as skirmishers. Bradley could not but notice the marke_ifference between this formation and the moblike methods of the lower tribe_e had come in contact with, and he commented upon it to Co-Tan.
  • “Galu warriors always advance into battle thus,” she said. “The lesser peopl_emain in a huddled group where they can scarce use their weapons the whil_hey present so big a mark to us that our spears and arrows cannot miss them; but when they hurl theirs at our warriors, if they miss the first man, ther_s no chance that they will kill some one behind him.
  • “Stand still now,” she cautioned, “and fold your arms. They will not harm u_hen.”
  • Bradley did as he was bid, and the two stood with arms folded as the line o_arriors approached. When they had come within some fifty yards, they halte_nd one spoke. “Who are you and from whence do you come?” he asked; and the_o-Tan gave a little, glad cry and sprang forward with out-stretched arms.
  • “Oh, Tan!” she exclaimed. “Do you not know your little Co-Tan?”
  • The warrior stared, incredulous, for a moment, and then he, too, ran forwar_nd when they met, took the girl in his arms. It was then that Bradle_xperienced to the full a sensation that was new to him—a sudden hatred fo_he strange warrior before him and a desire to kill without knowing why h_ould kill. He moved quickly to the girl’s side and grasped her wrist.
  • “Who is this man?” he demanded in cold tones.
  • Co-Tan turned a surprised face toward the Englishman and then of a sudde_roke forth into a merry peal of laughter. “This is my father, Brad-lee,” sh_ried.
  • “And who is Brad-lee?” demanded the warrior.
  • “He is my man,” replied Co-Tan simply.
  • “By what right?” insisted Tan.
  • And then she told him briefly of all that she had passed through since th_ieroos had stolen her and of how Bradley had rescued her and sought to rescu_n-Tak, her brother.
  • “You are satisfied with him?” asked Tan.
  • “Yes,” replied the girl proudly.
  • It was then that Bradley’s attention was attracted to the edge of the platea_y a movement there, and looking closely he saw a horse bearing two figure_liding down the steep declivity. Once at the bottom, the animal came chargin_cross the meadowland at a rapid run. It was a magnificent animal—a great ba_tallion with a white-blazed face and white forelegs to the knees, its barre_ncircled by a broad surcingle of white; and as it came to a sudden sto_eside Tan, the Englishman saw that it bore a man and a girl—a tall man and _irl as beautiful as Co-Tan. When the girl espied the latter, she slid fro_he horse and ran toward her, fairly screaming for joy.
  • The man dismounted and stood beside Tan. Like Bradley he was garbed after th_ashion of the surrounding warriors; but there was a subtle difference betwee_im and his companion. Possibly he detected a similar difference in Bradley, for his first question was, “From what country?” and though he spoke in Gal_radley thought he detected an accent.
  • “England,” replied Bradley.
  • A broad smile lighted the newcomer’s face as he held out his hand. “I am To_illings of Santa Monica, California,” he said. “I know all about you, and I’_ighty glad to find you alive.”
  • “How did you get here?” asked Bradley. “I thought ours was the only party o_en from the outer world ever to enter Caprona.”
  • “It was, until we came in search of Bowen J. Tyler, Jr.,” replied Billings.
  • “We found him and sent him home with his bride; but I was kept a prisone_ere.”
  • Bradley’s face darkened—then they were not among friends after all. “There ar_en of us down there on a German sub with small-arms and a gun,” he sai_uickly in English. “It will be no trick to get away from these people.”
  • “You don’t know my jailer,” replied Billings, “or you’d not be so sure. Wait, I’ll introduce you.” And then turning to the girl who had accompanied him h_alled her by name. “Ajor,” he said, “permit me to introduce Lieutenan_radley; Lieutenant, Mrs. Billings—my jailer!”
  • The Englishman laughed as he shook hands with the girl. “You are not as good _oldier as I,” he said to Billings. “Instead of being taken prisoner myself _ave taken one—Mrs. Bradley, this is Mr. Billings.”
  • Ajor, quick to understand, turned toward Co-Tan. “You are going back with hi_o his country?” she asked. Co-Tan admitted it.
  • “You dare?” asked Ajor. “But your father will not permit it— Jor, my father, High Chief of the Galus, will not permit it, for like me you are cos-ata-lo.
  • Oh, Co-Tan, if we but could! How I would love to see all the strange an_onderful things of which my Tom tells me!”
  • Bradley bent and whispered in her ear. “Say the word and you may both go wit_s.”
  • Billings heard and speaking in English, asked Ajor if she would go.
  • “Yes,” she answered, “If you wish it; but you know, my Tom, that if Jo_aptures us, both you and Co-Tan’s man will pay the penalty with you_ives—not even his love for me nor his admiration for you can save you.”
  • Bradley noticed that she spoke in English—broken English like Co-Tan’s bu_qually appealing. “We can easily get you aboard the ship,” he said, “on som_retext or other, and then we can steam away. They can neither harm nor detai_s, nor will we have to fire a shot at them.”
  • And so it was done, Bradley and Co-Tan taking Ajor and Billings aboard to “show” them the vessel, which almost immediately raised anchor and move_lowly out into the sea.
  • “I hate to do it,” said Billings. “They have been fine to me. Jor and Tan ar_plendid men and they will think me an ingrate; but I can’t waste my life her_hen there is so much to be done in the outer world.”
  • As they steamed down the inland sea past the island of Oo-oh, the stories o_heir adventures were retold, and Bradley learned that Bowen Tyler and hi_ride had left the Galu country but a fortnight before and that there wa_very reason to believe that the Toreador might still be lying in the Pacifi_ot far off the subterranean mouth of the river which emitted Caprona’s heate_aters into the ocean.
  • Late in the second day, after running through swarms of hideous reptiles, the_ubmerged at the point where the river entered beneath the cliffs and shortl_fter rose to the sunlit surface of the Pacific; but nowhere as far as the_ould see was sign of another craft. Down the coast they steamed toward th_each where Billings had made his crossing in the hydro-aeroplane and just a_usk the lookout announced a light dead ahead. It proved to be aboard th_oreador, and a half-hour later there was such a reunion on the deck of th_rig little yacht as no one there had ever dreamed might be possible. Of th_llies there were only Tippet and James to be mourned, and no one mourned an_f the Germans dead nor Benson, the traitor, whose ugly story was first tol_n Bowen Tyler’s manuscript.
  • Tyler and the rescue party had but just reached the yacht that afternoon. The_ad heard, faintly, the signal shots fired by the U-33 but had been unable t_ocate their direction and so had assumed that they had come from the guns o_he Toreador.
  • It was a happy party that sailed north toward sunny, southern California, th_ld U-33 trailing in the wake of the Toreador and flying with the latter th_lorious Stars and Stripes beneath which she had been born in the shipyard a_anta Monica. Three newly married couples, their bonds now duly solemnized b_he master of the ship, joyed in the peace and security of the untracke_aters of the south Pacific and the unique honeymoon which, had it not bee_or stern duty ahead, they could have wished protracted till the end of time.
  • And so they came one day to dock at the shipyard which Bowen Tyler no_ontrolled, and here the U-33 still lies while those who passed so man_ventful days within and because of her, have gone their various ways.