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Chapter 2

  • THE prince suddenly approached Evgenie Pavlovitch.
  • "Evgenie Pavlovitch," he said, with strange excitement and seizing th_atter's hand in his own, "be assured that I esteem you as a generous an_onourable man, in spite of everything. Be assured of that."
  • Evgenie Pavlovitch fell back a step in astonishment. For one moment it was al_e could do to restrain himself from bursting out laughing; but, lookin_loser, he observed that the prince did not seem to be quite himself; at al_vents, he was in a very curious state.
  • "I wouldn't mind betting, prince," he cried, "that you did not in the leas_ean to say that, and very likely you meant to address someone els_ltogether. What is it? Are you feeling unwell or anything?"
  • "Very likely, extremely likely, and you must be a very close observer t_etect the fact that perhaps I did not intend to come up to YOU at all."
  • So saying he smiled strangely; but suddenly and excitedly he began again:
  • "Don't remind me of what I have done or said. Don't! I am very much ashamed o_yself, I—"
  • "Why, what have you done? I don't understand you."
  • "I see you are ashamed of me, Evgenie Pavlovitch; you are blushing for me; that's a sign of a good heart. Don't be afraid; I shall go away directly."
  • "What's the matter with him? Do his fits begin like that?" said Lizabeth_rokofievna, in a high state of alarm, addressing Colia.
  • "No, no, Lizabetha Prokofievna, take no notice of me. I am not going to have _it. I will go away directly; but I know I am afflicted. I was twenty-fou_ears an invalid, you see—the first twenty-four years of my life—so take all _o and say as the sayings and actions of an invalid. I'm going away directly, I really am—don't be afraid. I am not blushing, for I don't think I need blus_bout it, need I? But I see that I am out of place in society—society i_etter without me. It's not vanity, I assure you. I have thought over it al_hese last three days, and I have made up my mind that I ought to unboso_yself candidly before you at the first opportunity. There are certain things, certain great ideas, which I must not so much as approach, as Prince S. ha_ust reminded me, or I shall make you all laugh. I have no sense o_roportion, I know; my words and gestures do not express my ideas—they are _umiliation and abasement of the ideas, and therefore, I have no right—and _m too sensitive. Still, I believe I am beloved in this household, an_steemed far more than I deserve. But I can't help knowing that after twenty- four years of illness there must be some trace left, so that it is impossibl_or people to refrain from laughing at me sometimes; don't you think so?"
  • He seemed to pause for a reply, for some verdict, as it were, and looke_umbly around him.
  • All present stood rooted to the earth with amazement at this unexpected an_pparently uncalled-for outbreak; but the poor prince's painful and ramblin_peech gave rise to a strange episode.
  • "Why do you say all this here?" cried Aglaya, suddenly. "Why do you talk lik_his to THEM?"
  • She appeared to be in the last stages of wrath and irritation; her eye_lashed. The prince stood dumbly and blindly before her, and suddenly gre_ale.
  • "There is not one of them all who is worthy of these words of yours,"
  • continued Aglaya. "Not one of them is worth your little finger, not one o_hem has heart or head to compare with yours! You are more honest than all, and better, nobler, kinder, wiser than all. There are some here who ar_nworthy to bend and pick up the handkerchief you have just dropped. Why d_ou humiliate yourself like this, and place yourself lower than these people?
  • Why do you debase yourself before them? Why have you no pride?"
  • "My God! Who would ever have believed this?" cried Mrs. Epanchin, wringing he_ands.
  • "Hurrah for the 'poor knight'!" cried Colia.
  • "Be quiet! How dare they laugh at me in your house?" said Aglaya, turnin_harply on her mother in that hysterical frame of mind that rides recklessl_ver every obstacle and plunges blindly through proprieties. "Why doe_veryone, everyone worry and torment me? Why have they all been bullying m_hese three days about you, prince? I will not marry you—never, and under n_ircumstances! Know that once and for all; as if anyone could marry an absur_reature like you! Just look in the glass and see what you look like, thi_ery moment! Why, WHY do they torment me and say I am going to marry you? Yo_ust know it; you are in the plot with them!"
  • "No one ever tormented you on the subject," murmured Adelaida, aghast.
  • "No one ever thought of such a thing! There has never been a word said abou_t!" cried Alexandra.
  • "Who has been annoying her? Who has been tormenting the child? Who could hav_aid such a thing to her? Is she raving?" cried Lizabetha Prokofievna, trembling with rage, to the company in general.
  • "Every one of them has been saying it—every one of them—all these three days!
  • And I will never, never marry him!"
  • So saying, Aglaya burst into bitter tears, and, hiding her face in he_andkerchief, sank back into a chair.
  • "But he has never even—"
  • "I have never asked you to marry me, Aglaya Ivanovna!" said the prince, of _udden.
  • "WHAT?" cried Mrs. Epanchin, raising her hands in horror. "WHAT'S that?"
  • She could not believe her ears.
  • "I meant to say—I only meant to say," said the prince, faltering, "I merel_eant to explain to Aglaya Ivanovna—to have the honour to explain, as i_ere—that I had no intention—never had—to ask the honour of her hand. I assur_ou I am not guilty, Aglaya Ivanovna, I am not, indeed. I never did wish to—_ever thought of it at all—and never shall—you'll see it yourself—you may b_uite assured of it. Some wicked person has been maligning me to you; but it'_ll right. Don't worry about it."
  • So saying, the prince approached Aglaya.
  • She took the handkerchief from her face, glanced keenly at him, took in wha_e had said, and burst out laughing—such a merry, unrestrained laugh, s_earty and gay, that. Adelaida could not contain herself. She, too, glanced a_he prince's panic-stricken countenance, then rushed at her sister, threw he_rms round her neck, and burst into as merry a fit of laughter as Aglaya'_wn. They laughed together like a couple of school-girls. Hearing and seein_his, the prince smiled happily, and in accents of relief and joy, h_xclaimed "Well, thank God—thank God!"
  • Alexandra now joined in, and it looked as though the three sisters were goin_o laugh on for ever.
  • "They are insane," muttered Lizabetha Prokofievna. "Either they frighten on_ut of one's wits, or else—"
  • But Prince S. was laughing now, too, so was Evgenie Pavlovitch, so was Colia, and so was the prince himself, who caught the infection as he looked roun_adiantly upon the others.
  • "Come along, let's go out for a walk!" cried Adelaida. "We'll all go together, and the prince must absolutely go with us. You needn't go away, you dear goo_ellow! ISN'T he a dear, Aglaya? Isn't he, mother? I must really give him _iss for—for his explanation to Aglaya just now. Mother, dear, I may kiss him, mayn't I? Aglaya, may I kiss YOUR prince?" cried the young rogue, and sur_nough she skipped up to the prince and kissed his forehead.
  • He seized her hands, and pressed them so hard that Adelaida nearly cried out; he then gazed with delight into her eyes, and raising her right hand to hi_ips with enthusiasm, kissed it three times.
  • "Come along," said Aglaya. "Prince, you must walk with me. May he, mother?
  • This young cavalier, who won't have me? You said you would NEVER have me, didn't you, prince? No-no, not like that; THAT'S not the way to give your arm.
  • Don't you know how to give your arm to a lady yet? There—so. Now, come along, you and I will lead the way. Would you like to lead the way with me alone, tete-a-tete?"
  • She went on talking and chatting without a pause, with occasional littl_ursts of laughter between.
  • "Thank God—thank God!" said Lizabetha Prokofievna to herself, without quit_nowing why she felt so relieved.
  • "What extraordinary people they are!" thought Prince S., for perhaps th_undredth time since he had entered into intimate relations with the family; but—he liked these "extraordinary people," all the same. As for Prince Le_icolaievitch himself, Prince S. did not seem quite to like him, somehow. H_as decidedly preoccupied and a little disturbed as they all started off.
  • Evgenie Pavlovitch seemed to be in a lively humour. He made Adelaida an_lexandra laugh all the way to the Vauxhall; but they both laughed so ver_eally and promptly that the worthy Evgenie began at last to suspect that the_ere not listening to him at all.
  • At this idea, he burst out laughing all at once, in quite unaffected mirth, and without giving any explanation.
  • The sisters, who also appeared to be in high spirits, never tired of glancin_t Aglaya and the prince, who were walking in front. It was evident that thei_ounger sister was a thorough puzzle to them both.
  • Prince S. tried hard to get up a conversation with Mrs. Epanchin upon outsid_ubjects, probably with the good intention of distracting and amusing her; bu_e bored her dreadfully. She was absent-minded to a degree, and answered a_ross purposes, and sometimes not at all.
  • But the puzzle and mystery of Aglaya was not yet over for the evening. Th_ast exhibition fell to the lot of the prince alone. When they had proceede_ome hundred paces or so from the house, Aglaya said to her obstinately silen_avalier in a quick half-whisper:
  • "Look to the right!"
  • The prince glanced in the direction indicated.
  • "Look closer. Do you see that bench, in the park there, just by those thre_ig trees—that green bench?"
  • The prince replied that he saw it.
  • "Do you like the position of it? Sometimes of a morning early, at seve_'clock, when all the rest are still asleep, I come out and sit there alone."
  • The prince muttered that the spot was a lovely one.
  • "Now, go away, I don't wish to have your arm any longer; or perhaps, better, continue to give me your arm, and walk along beside me, but don't speak a wor_o me. I wish to think by myself."
  • The warning was certainly unnecessary; for the prince would not have said _ord all the rest of the time whether forbidden to speak or not. His hear_eat loud and painfully when Aglaya spoke of the bench; could she—but no! h_anished the thought, after an instant's deliberation.
  • At Pavlofsk, on weekdays, the public is more select than it is on Sundays an_aturdays, when the townsfolk come down to walk about and enjoy the park.
  • The ladies dress elegantly, on these days, and it is the fashion to gathe_ound the band, which is probably the best of our pleasure-garden bands, an_lays the newest pieces. The behaviour of the public is most correct an_roper, and there is an appearance of friendly intimacy among the usua_requenters. Many come for nothing but to look at their acquaintances, bu_here are others who come for the sake of the music. It is very seldom tha_nything happens to break the harmony of the proceedings, though, of course, accidents will happen everywhere.
  • On this particular evening the weather was lovely, and there were a larg_umber of people present. All the places anywhere near the orchestra wer_ccupied.
  • Our friends took chairs near the side exit. The crowd and the music cheere_rs. Epanchin a little, and amused the girls; they bowed and shook hands wit_ome of their friends and nodded at a distance to others; they examined th_adies' dresses, noticed comicalities and eccentricities among the people, an_aughed and talked among themselves. Evgenie Pavlovitch, too, found plenty o_riends to bow to. Several people noticed Aglaya and the prince, who wer_till together.
  • Before very long two or three young men had come up, and one or two remaine_o talk; all of these young men appeared to be on intimate terms with Evgeni_avlovitch. Among them was a young officer, a remarkably handsome fellow—ver_ood-natured and a great chatterbox. He tried to get up a conversation wit_glaya, and did his best to secure her attention. Aglaya behaved ver_raciously to him, and chatted and laughed merrily. Evgenie Pavlovitch begge_he prince's leave to introduce their friend to him. The prince hardl_ealized what was wanted of him, but the introduction came off; the two me_owed and shook hands.
  • Evgenie Pavlovitch's friend asked the prince some question, but the latter di_ot reply, or if he did, he muttered something so strangely indistinct tha_here was nothing to be made of it. The officer stared intently at him, the_lanced at Evgenie, divined why the latter had introduced him, and gave hi_ndivided attention to Aglaya again. Only Evgenie Pavlovitch observed tha_glaya flushed up for a moment at this.
  • The prince did not notice that others were talking and making themselve_greeable to Aglaya; in fact, at moments, he almost forgot that he was sittin_y her himself. At other moments he felt a longing to go away somewhere and b_lone with his thoughts, and to feel that no one knew where he was.
  • Or if that were impossible he would like to be alone at home, on the terrace- without either Lebedeff or his children, or anyone else about him, and to li_here and think—a day and night and another day again! He thought of th_ountains-and especially of a certain spot which he used to frequent, whenc_e would look down upon the distant valleys and fields, and see the waterfall, far off, like a little silver thread, and the old ruined castle in th_istance. Oh! how he longed to be there now—alone with his thoughts—to thin_f one thing all his life—one thing! A thousand years would not be too muc_ime! And let everyone here forget him—forget him utterly! How much better i_ould have been if they had never known him—if all this could but prove to b_ dream. Perhaps it was a dream!
  • Now and then he looked at Aglaya for five minutes at a time, without takin_is eyes off her face; but his expression was very strange; he would gaze a_er as though she were an object a couple of miles distant, or as though h_ere looking at her portrait and not at herself at all.
  • "Why do you look at me like that, prince?" she asked suddenly, breaking of_er merry conversation and laughter with those about her. "I'm afraid of you!
  • You look as though you were just going to put out your hand and touch my fac_o see if it's real! Doesn't he, Evgenie Pavlovitch—doesn't he look lik_hat?"
  • The prince seemed surprised that he should have been addressed at all; h_eflected a moment, but did not seem to take in what had been said to him; a_ll events, he did not answer. But observing that she and the others had begu_o laugh, he too opened his mouth and laughed with them.
  • The laughter became general, and the young officer, who seemed a particularl_ively sort of person, simply shook with mirth.
  • Aglaya suddenly whispered angrily to herself the word—
  • "Idiot!"
  • "My goodness—surely she is not in love with such a—surely she isn't mad!"
  • groaned Mrs. Epanchin, under her breath.
  • "It's all a joke, mamma; it's just a joke like the 'poor knight'—nothing mor_hatever, I assure you!" Alexandra whispered in her ear. "She is chaffin_im—making a fool of him, after her own private fashion, that's all! But sh_arries it just a little too far—she is a regular little actress. How sh_rightened us just now—didn't she?—and all for a lark!"
  • "Well, it's lucky she has happened upon an idiot, then, that's all I can say!"
  • whispered Lizabetha Prokofievna, who was somewhat comforted, however, by he_aughter's remark.
  • The prince had heard himself referred to as "idiot," and had shuddered at th_oment; but his shudder, it so happened, was not caused by the word applied t_im. The fact was that in the crowd, not far from where lie was sitting, _ale familiar face, with curly black hair, and a well-known smile an_xpression, had flashed across his vision for a moment, and disappeared again.
  • Very likely he had imagined it! There only remained to him the impression of _trange smile, two eyes, and a bright green tie. Whether the man ha_isappeared among the crowd, or whether he had turned towards the Vauxhall, the prince could not say.
  • But a moment or two afterwards he began to glance keenly about him. That firs_ision might only too likely be the forerunner of a second; it was almos_ertain to be so. Surely he had not forgotten the possibility of such _eeting when he came to the Vauxhall? True enough, he had not remarked wher_e was coming to when he set out with Aglaya; he had not been in a conditio_o remark anything at all.
  • Had he been more careful to observe his companion, he would have seen that fo_he last quarter of an hour Aglaya had also been glancing around in apparen_nxiety, as though she expected to see someone, or something particular, amon_he crowd of people. Now, at the moment when his own anxiety became so marked, her excitement also increased visibly, and when he looked about him, she di_he same.
  • The reason for their anxiety soon became apparent. From that very sid_ntrance to the Vauxhall, near which the prince and all the Epanchin part_ere seated, there suddenly appeared quite a large knot of persons, at least _ozen.
  • Heading this little band walked three ladies, two of whom were remarkabl_ovely; and there was nothing surprising in the fact that they should have ha_ large troop of admirers following in their wake.
  • But there was something in the appearance of both the ladies and thei_dmirers which was peculiar, quite different for that of the rest of th_ublic assembled around the orchestra.
  • Nearly everyone observed the little band advancing, and all pretended not t_ee or notice them, except a few young fellows who exchanged glances an_miled, saying something to one another in whispers.
  • It was impossible to avoid noticing them, however, in reality, for they mad_heir presence only too conspicuous by laughing and talking loudly. It was t_e supposed that some of them were more than half drunk, although they wer_ell enough dressed, some even particularly well. There were one or two, however, who were very strange-looking creatures, with flushed faces an_xtraordinary clothes; some were military men; not all were quite young; on_r two were middle-aged gentlemen of decidedly disagreeable appearance, me_ho are avoided in society like the plague, decked out in large gold studs an_ings, and magnificently "got up," generally.
  • Among our suburban resorts there are some which enjoy a specially hig_eputation for respectability and fashion; but the most careful individual i_ot absolutely exempt from the danger of a tile falling suddenly upon his hea_rom his neighbour's roof.
  • Such a tile was about to descend upon the elegant and decorous public no_ssembled to hear the music.
  • In order to pass from the Vauxhall to the band-stand, the visitor has t_escend two or three steps. Just at these steps the group paused, as though i_eared to proceed further; but very quickly one of the three ladies, wh_ormed its apex, stepped forward into the charmed circle, followed by tw_embers of her suite.
  • One of these was a middle-aged man of very respectable appearance, but wit_he stamp of parvenu upon him, a man whom nobody knew, and who evidently kne_obody. The other follower was younger and far less respectable-looking.
  • No one else followed the eccentric lady; but as she descended the steps sh_id not even look behind her, as though it were absolutely the same to he_hether anyone were following or not. She laughed and talked loudly, however, just as before. She was dressed with great taste, but with rather mor_agnificence than was needed for the occasion, perhaps.
  • She walked past the orchestra, to where an open carriage was waiting, near th_oad.
  • The prince had not seen HER for more than three months. All these days sinc_is arrival from Petersburg he had intended to pay her a visit, but som_ysterious presentiment had restrained him. He could not picture to himsel_hat impression this meeting with her would make upon him, though he had ofte_ried to imagine it, with fear and trembling. One fact was quite certain, an_hat was that the meeting would be painful.
  • Several times during the last six months he had recalled the effect which th_irst sight of this face had had upon him, when he only saw its portrait. H_ecollected well that even the portrait face had left but too painful a_mpression.
  • That month in the provinces, when he had seen this woman nearly every day, ha_ffected him so deeply that he could not now look back upon it calmly. In th_ery look of this woman there was something which tortured him. I_onversation with Rogojin he had attributed this sensation t_ity—immeasurable pity, and this was the truth. The sight of the portrait fac_lone had filled his heart full of the agony of real sympathy; and thi_eeling of sympathy, nay, of actual SUFFERING, for her, had never left hi_eart since that hour, and was still in full force. Oh yes, and more powerfu_han ever!
  • But the prince was not satisfied with what he had said to Rogojin. Only a_his moment, when she suddenly made her appearance before him, did he realiz_o the full the exact emotion which she called up in him, and which he had no_escribed correctly to Rogojin.
  • And, indeed, there were no words in which he could have expressed his horror, yes, HORROR, for he was now fully convinced from his own private knowledge o_er, that the woman was mad.
  • If, loving a woman above everything in the world, or at least having _oretaste of the possibility of such love for her, one were suddenly to behol_er on a chain, behind bars and under the lash of a keeper, one would fee_omething like what the poor prince now felt.
  • "What's the matter?" asked Aglaya, in a whisper, giving his sleeve a littl_ug.
  • He turned his head towards her and glanced at her black and (for some reason) flashing eyes, tried to smile, and then, apparently forgetting her in a_nstant, turned to the right once more, and continued to watch the startlin_pparition before him.
  • Nastasia Philipovna was at this moment passing the young ladies' chairs.
  • Evgenie Pavlovitch continued some apparently extremely funny and interestin_necdote to Alexandra, speaking quickly and with much animation. The princ_emembered that at this moment Aglaya remarked in a half-whisper:
  • "WHAT a—"
  • She did not finish her indefinite sentence; she restrained herself in _oment; but it was enough.
  • Nastasia Philipovna, who up to now had been walking along as though she ha_ot noticed the Epanchin party, suddenly turned her head in their direction, as though she had just observed Evgenie Pavlovitch sitting there for the firs_ime.
  • "Why, I declare, here he is!" she cried, stopping suddenly. "The man one can'_ind with all one's messengers sent about the place, sitting just under one'_ose, exactly where one never thought of looking! I thought you were sure t_e at your uncle's by this time."
  • Evgenie Pavlovitch flushed up and looked angrily at Nastasia Philipovna, the_urned his back on her.
  • "What I don't you know about it yet? He doesn't know—imagine that! Why, he'_hot himself. Your uncle shot himself this very morning. I was told at tw_his afternoon. Half the town must know it by now. They say there are thre_undred and fifty thousand roubles, government money, missing; some say fiv_undred thousand. And I was under the impression that he would leave you _ortune! He's whistled it all away. A most depraved old gentleman, really!
  • Well, ta, ta!—bonne chance! Surely you intend to be off there, don't you? Ha, ha! You've retired from the army in good time, I see! Plain clothes! Wel_one, sly rogue! Nonsense! I see—you knew it all before—I dare say you kne_ll about it yesterday-"
  • Although the impudence of this attack, this public proclamation of intimacy, as it were, was doubtless premeditated, and had its special object, ye_vgenie Pavlovitch at first seemed to intend to make no show of observin_ither his tormentor or her words. But Nastasia's communication struck hi_ith the force of a thunderclap. On hearing of his uncle's death he suddenl_rew as white as a sheet, and turned towards his informant.
  • At this moment, Lizabetha Prokofievna rose swiftly from her seat, beckoned he_ompanions, and left the place almost at a run.
  • Only the prince stopped behind for a moment, as though in indecision; an_vgenie Pavlovitch lingered too, for he had not collected his scattered wits.
  • But the Epanchins had not had time to get more than twenty paces away when _candalous episode occurred. The young officer, Evgenie Pavlovitch's frien_ho had been conversing with Aglaya, said aloud in a great state o_ndignation:
  • "She ought to be whipped—that's the only way to deal with creatures lik_hat—she ought to be whipped!"
  • This gentleman was a confidant of Evgenie's, and had doubtless heard of th_arriage episode.
  • Nastasia turned to him. Her eyes flashed; she rushed up to a young ma_tanding near, whom she did not know in the least, but who happened to have i_is hand a thin cane. Seizing this from him, she brought it with all her forc_cross the face of her insulter.
  • All this occurred, of course, in one instant of time.
  • The young officer, forgetting himself, sprang towards her. Nastasia'_ollowers were not by her at the moment (the elderly gentleman havin_isappeared altogether, and the younger man simply standing aside and roarin_ith laughter).
  • In another moment, of course, the police would have been on the spot, and i_ould have gone hard with Nastasia Philipovna had not unexpected aid appeared.
  • Muishkin, who was but a couple of steps away, had time to spring forward an_eize the officer's arms from behind.
  • The officer, tearing himself from the prince's grasp, pushed him so violentl_ackwards that he staggered a few steps and then subsided into a chair.
  • But there were other defenders for Nastasia on the spot by this time. Th_entleman known as the "boxer" now confronted the enraged officer.
  • "Keller is my name, sir; ex-lieutenant," he said, very loud. "If you wil_ccept me as champion of the fair sex, I am at your disposal. English boxin_as no secrets from me. I sympathize with you for the insult you hav_eceived, but I can't permit you to raise your hand against a woman in public.
  • If you prefer to meet me—as would be more fitting to your rank—in some othe_anner, of course you understand me, captain."
  • But the young officer had recovered himself, and was no longer listening. A_his moment Rogojin appeared, elbowing through the crowd; he took Nastasia'_and, drew it through his arm, and quickly led her away. He appeared to b_erribly excited; he was trembling all over, and was as pale as a corpse. A_e carried Nastasia off, he turned and grinned horribly in the officer's face, and with low malice observed:
  • "Tfu! look what the fellow got! Look at the blood on his cheek! Ha, ha!"
  • Recollecting himself, however, and seeing at a glance the sort of people h_ad to deal with, the officer turned his back on both his opponents, an_ourteously, but concealing his face with his handkerchief, approached th_rince, who was now rising from the chair into which he had fallen.
  • "Prince Muishkin, I believe? The gentleman to whom I had the honour of bein_ntroduced?"
  • "She is mad, insane—I assure you, she is mad," replied the prince in tremblin_ones, holding out both his hands mechanically towards the officer.
  • "I cannot boast of any such knowledge, of course, but I wished to know you_ame."
  • He bowed and retired without waiting for an answer.
  • Five seconds after the disappearance of the last actor in this scene, th_olice arrived. The whole episode had not lasted more than a couple o_inutes. Some of the spectators had risen from their places, and departe_ltogether; some merely exchanged their seats for others a little further off; some were delighted with the occurrence, and talked and laughed over it for _ong time.
  • In a word, the incident closed as such incidents do, and the band began t_lay again. The prince walked away after the Epanchin party. Had he thought o_ooking round to the left after he had been pushed so unceremoniously into th_hair, he would have observed Aglaya standing some twenty yards away. She ha_tayed to watch the scandalous scene in spite of her mother's and sisters'
  • anxious cries to her to come away.
  • Prince S. ran up to her and persuaded her, at last, to come home with them.
  • Lizabetha Prokofievna saw that she returned in such a state of agitation tha_t was doubtful whether she had even heard their calls. But only a couple o_inutes later, when they had reached the park, Aglaya suddenly remarked, i_er usual calm, indifferent voice:
  • "I wanted to see how the farce would end."