Table of Contents

+ Add to Library

Previous Next

OF LIGHT

  • "Do the inhabitants of the hole see the moon and the stars?"
  • "Partly, I conceive. They get the good of the moon about nine days in the
  • month, and can see such parts of the heavens as are visible out of the ends of
  • the hole. That's all; but it would never be real night there, for even when
  • the sun would be off on one side its light would be reflected from the walls
  • of the other side. You see the earth is moving about the sun all the time. Not
  • that I think it goes round in the form them astronomers say it does. I think
  • it goes round on the high and low orbit, that is, one side of the circle is
  • raised in coming down from the sun—and always at the same distance from the
  • sun. Any globe working about the sun must have the same force and the same
  • balance all the time to keep face. The theory of the astronomers is that it
  • goes out many millions of miles at certain times of the year and comes back.
  • Now, there would be no order or regularity about that. It isn't reason. It
  • would make a regular hurly-burly of everything if the earth was allowed to run
  • around in that wild way. And there's another thing that goes to show the world
  • is hollow inside. A solid globe you can't make roll of itself in the sunlight
  • but a hollow one will. You go to work and make a globe of fine silk and fill
  • it with gas, or make it of cork and hollow, and put it into a glass jar in the
  • sun, and pump the air out, and raise it up to a certain temperature—about 180
  • degrees or maybe 200, I think—and it'll roll in the sun, but a solid one won't
  • do it. So it stands to reason the earth is hollow, so it will roll in the sun.
  • I've tried that experiment in my shop during the war. I made it up nice, but I
  • haven't got it now, for my shop was robbed three years ago, and I lost that
  • and a lot more things, and all my tools. The model I had for the Patent Office
  • was carried away, too."
  • "But let us get back to our hole. Beyond what the sailor told you, you have
  • nothing more than theory?"
  • "Not altogether. There are signs of life from further to the south than
  • anybody has ever gone yet that we know of. I read in a paper last August that
  • an English captain went far enough south to get into warm water; and there he
  • picked up a log drifting from still further south, with nails in it and marks
  • of an ax on it, and that log he brought back with him to England, and it's
  • there now. Anyway, I read that in the paper—but," speaking in a tone of
  • regretful sadness, "these newspapers start so many curious things and ideas
  • that you can't always be certain about what they say. But other sailor men
  • than that captain have found the water growing warmer, and had reason to know
  • of open seas at the poles. Besides, there's another thing that goes to show
  • that there's life inside the earth, and that is the great bones and tusks of
  • animals, so big that no animals on the earth now can carry them or have such
  • things, that they find away up in Siberia. Them came from the inside of the
  • earth, I've no doubt, drifted out in the ice that was parted there when the
  • sun cracked the floes and set them drifting out in a polar current."