Table of Contents

+ Add to Library

Previous Next

Chapter 17 Visit of Mutineers

  • In a little time, however, no more canoes appearing, the fear of their comin_ore off; and I began to take my former thoughts of a voyage to the main int_onsideration; being likewise assured by Friday's father that I might depen_pon good usage from their nation, on his account, if I would go. But m_houghts were a little suspended when I had a serious discourse with th_paniard, and when I understood that there were sixteen more of his countryme_nd Portuguese, who having been cast away and made their escape to that side,
  • lived there at peace, indeed, with the savages, but were very sore put to i_or necessaries, and, indeed, for life. I asked him all the particulars o_heir voyage, and found they were a Spanish ship, bound from the Rio de l_lata to the Havanna, being directed to leave their loading there, which wa_hiefly hides and silver, and to bring back what European goods they coul_eet with there; that they had five Portuguese seamen on board, whom they too_ut of another wreck; that five of their own men were drowned when first th_hip was lost, and that these escaped through infinite dangers and hazards,
  • and arrived, almost starved, on the cannibal coast, where they expected t_ave been devoured every moment. He told me they had some arms with them, bu_hey were perfectly useless, for that they had neither powder nor ball, th_ashing of the sea having spoiled all their powder but a little, which the_sed at their first landing to provide themselves with some food.
  • I asked him what he thought would become of them there, and if they had forme_ny design of making their escape. He said they had many consultations abou_t; but that having neither vessel nor tools to build one, nor provisions o_ny kind, their councils always ended in tears and despair. I asked him how h_hought they would receive a proposal from me, which might tend towards a_scape; and whether, if they were all here, it might not be done. I told hi_ith freedom, I feared mostly their treachery and ill- usage of me, if I pu_y life in their hands; for that gratitude was no inherent virtue in th_ature of man, nor did men always square their dealings by the obligation_hey had received so much as they did by the advantages they expected. I tol_im it would be very hard that I should be made the instrument of thei_eliverance, and that they should afterwards make me their prisoner in Ne_pain, where an Englishman was certain to be made a sacrifice, what necessit_r what accident soever brought him thither; and that I had rather b_elivered up to the savages, and be devoured alive, than fall into th_erciless claws of the priests, and be carried into the Inquisition. I adde_hat, otherwise, I was persuaded, if they were all here, we might, with s_any hands, build a barque large enough to carry us all away, either to th_razils southward, or to the islands or Spanish coast northward; but that if,
  • in requital, they should, when I had put weapons into their hands, carry me b_orce among their own people, I might be ill-used for my kindness to them, an_ake my case worse than it was before.
  • He answered, with a great deal of candour and ingenuousness, that thei_ondition was so miserable, and that they were so sensible of it, that h_elieved they would abhor the thought of using any man unkindly that shoul_ontribute to their deliverance; and that, if I pleased, he would go to the_ith the old man, and discourse with them about it, and return again and brin_e their answer; that he would make conditions with them upon their solem_ath, that they should be absolutely under my direction as their commander an_aptain; and they should swear upon the holy sacraments and gospel to be tru_o me, and go to such Christian country as I should agree to, and no other;
  • and to be directed wholly and absolutely by my orders till they were lande_afely in such country as I intended, and that he would bring a contract fro_hem, under their hands, for that purpose. Then he told me he would firs_wear to me himself that he would never stir from me as long as he lived til_ gave him orders; and that he would take my side to the last drop of hi_lood, if there should happen the least breach of faith among his countrymen.
  • He told me they were all of them very civil, honest men, and they were unde_he greatest distress imaginable, having neither weapons nor clothes, nor an_ood, but at the mercy and discretion of the savages; out of all hopes of eve_eturning to their own country; and that he was sure, if I would undertak_heir relief, they would live and die by me.
  • Upon these assurances, I resolved to venture to relieve them, if possible, an_o send the old savage and this Spaniard over to them to treat. But when w_ad got all things in readiness to go, the Spaniard himself started a_bjection, which had so much prudence in it on one hand, and so much sincerit_n the other hand, that I could not but be very well satisfied in it; and, b_is advice, put off the deliverance of his comrades for at least half a year.
  • The case was thus: he had been with us now about a month, during which time _ad let him see in what manner I had provided, with the assistance o_rovidence, for my support; and he saw evidently what stock of corn and rice _ad laid up; which, though it was more than sufficient for myself, yet it wa_ot sufficient, without good husbandry, for my family, now it was increased t_our; but much less would it be sufficient if his countrymen, who were, as h_aid, sixteen, still alive, should come over; and least of all would it b_ufficient to victual our vessel, if we should build one, for a voyage to an_f the Christian colonies of America; so he told me he thought it would b_ore advisable to let him and the other two dig and cultivate some more land,
  • as much as I could spare seed to sow, and that we should wait another harvest,
  • that we might have a supply of corn for his countrymen, when they should come;
  • for want might be a temptation to them to disagree, or not to think themselve_elivered, otherwise than out of one difficulty into another. “You know,” say_e, “the children of Israel, though they rejoiced at first for their bein_elivered out of Egypt, yet rebelled even against God Himself, that delivere_hem, when they came to want bread in the wilderness.”
  • His caution was so seasonable, and his advice so good, that I could not but b_ery well pleased with his proposal, as well as I was satisfied with hi_idelity; so we fell to digging, all four of us, as well as the wooden tool_e were furnished with permitted; and in about a month's time, by the end o_hich it was seed-time, we had got as much land cured and trimmed up as w_owed two-and- twenty bushels of barley on, and sixteen jars of rice, whic_as, in short, all the seed we had to spare: indeed, we left ourselves barel_ufficient, for our own food for the six months that we had to expect ou_rop; that is to say reckoning from the time we set our seed aside for sowing;
  • for it is not to be supposed it is six months in the ground in that country.
  • Having now society enough, and our numbers being sufficient to put us out o_ear of the savages, if they had come, unless their number had been ver_reat, we went freely all over the island, whenever we found occasion; and a_e had our escape or deliverance upon our thoughts, it was impossible, a_east for me, to have the means of it out of mine. For this purpose I marke_ut several trees, which I thought fit for our work, and I set Friday and hi_ather to cut them down; and then I caused the Spaniard, to whom I imparted m_houghts on that affair, to oversee and direct their work. I showed them wit_hat indefatigable pains I had hewed a large tree into single planks, and _aused them to do the like, till they made about a dozen large planks, of goo_ak, near two feet broad, thirty-five feet long, and from two inches to fou_nches thick: what prodigious labour it took up any one may imagine.
  • At the same time I contrived to increase my little flock of tame goats as muc_s I could; and for this purpose I made Friday and the Spaniard go out on_ay, and myself with Friday the next day (for we took our turns), and by thi_eans we got about twenty young kids to breed up with the rest; for wheneve_e shot the dam, we saved the kids, and added them to our flock. But abov_ll, the season for curing the grapes coming on, I caused such a prodigiou_uantity to be hung up in the sun, that, I believe, had we been at Alicant,
  • where the raisins of the sun are cured, we could have filled sixty or eight_arrels; and these, with our bread, formed a great part of our food - ver_ood living too, I assure you, for they are exceedingly nourishing.
  • It was now harvest, and our crop in good order: it was not the most plentifu_ncrease I had seen in the island, but, however, it was enough to answer ou_nd; for from twenty-two bushels of barley we brought in and thrashed ou_bove two hundred and twenty bushels; and the like in proportion of the rice;
  • which was store enough for our food to the next harvest, though all th_ixteen Spaniards had been on shore with me; or, if we had been ready for _oyage, it would very plentifully have victualled our ship to have carried u_o any part of the world; that is to say, any part of America. When we ha_hus housed and secured our magazine of corn, we fell to work to make mor_icker-ware, viz. great baskets, in which we kept it; and the Spaniard wa_ery handy and dexterous at this part, and often blamed me that I did not mak_ome things for defence of this kind of work; but I saw no need of it.
  • And now, having a full supply of food for all the guests I expected, I gav_he Spaniard leave to go over to the main, to see what he could do with thos_e had left behind him there. I gave him a strict charge not to bring any ma_ho would not first swear in the presence of himself and the old savage tha_e would in no way injure, fight with, or attack the person he should find i_he island, who was so kind as to send for them in order to their deliverance;
  • but that they would stand by him and defend him against all such attempts, an_herever they went would be entirely under and subjected to his command; an_hat this should be put in writing, and signed in their hands. How they wer_o have done this, when I knew they had neither pen nor ink, was a questio_hich we never asked. Under these instructions, the Spaniard and the ol_avage, the father of Friday, went away in one of the canoes which they migh_e said to have come in, or rather were brought in, when they came a_risoners to be devoured by the savages. I gave each of them a musket, with _irelock on it, and about eight charges of powder and ball, charging them t_e very good husbands of both, and not to use either of them but upon urgen_ccasions.
  • This was a cheerful work, being the first measures used by me in view of m_eliverance for now twenty-seven years and some days. I gave them provision_f bread and of dried grapes, sufficient for themselves for many days, an_ufficient for all the Spaniards - for about eight days' time; and wishin_hem a good voyage, I saw them go, agreeing with them about a signal the_hould hang out at their return, by which I should know them again when the_ame back, at a distance, before they came on shore. They went away with _air gale on the day that the moon was at full, by my account in the month o_ctober; but as for an exact reckoning of days, after I had once lost it _ould never recover it again; nor had I kept even the number of years s_unctually as to be sure I was right; though, as it proved when I afterward_xamined my account, I found I had kept a true reckoning of years.
  • It was no less than eight days I had waited for them, when a strange an_nforeseen accident intervened, of which the like has not, perhaps, been hear_f in history. I was fast asleep in my hutch one morning, when my man Frida_ame running in to me, and called aloud, “Master, master, they are come, the_re come!” I jumped up, and regardless of danger I went, as soon as I coul_et my clothes on, through my little grove, which, by the way, was by thi_ime grown to be a very thick wood; I say, regardless of danger I went withou_y arms, which was not my custom to do; but I was surprised when, turning m_yes to the sea, I presently saw a boat at about a league and a half distance,
  • standing in for the shore, with a shoulder-of-mutton sail, as they call it,
  • and the wind blowing pretty fair to bring them in: also I observed, presently,
  • that they did not come from that side which the shore lay on, but from th_outhernmost end of the island. Upon this I called Friday in, and bade him li_lose, for these were not the people we looked for, and that we might not kno_et whether they were friends or enemies. In the next place I went in to fetc_y perspective glass to see what I could make of them; and having taken th_adder out, I climbed up to the top of the hill, as I used to do when I wa_pprehensive of anything, and to take my view the plainer without bein_iscovered. I had scarce set my foot upon the hill when my eye plainl_iscovered a ship lying at anchor, at about two leagues and a half distanc_rom me, SSE., but not above a league and a half from the shore. By m_bservation it appeared plainly to be an English ship, and the boat appeare_o be an English long-boat.
  • I cannot express the confusion I was in, though the joy of seeing a ship, an_ne that I had reason to believe was manned by my own countrymen, an_onsequently friends, was such as I cannot describe; but yet I had some secre_oubts hung about me - I cannot tell from whence they came - bidding me kee_pon my guard. In the first place, it occurred to me to consider what busines_n English ship could have in that part of the world, since it was not the wa_o or from any part of the world where the English had any traffic; and I kne_here had been no storms to drive them in there in distress; and that if the_ere really English it was most probable that they were here upon no goo_esign; and that I had better continue as I was than fall into the hands o_hieves and murderers.
  • Let no man despise the secret hints and notices of danger which sometimes ar_iven him when he may think there is no possibility of its being real. Tha_uch hints and notices are given us I believe few that have made an_bservation of things can deny; that they are certain discoveries of a_nvisible world, and a converse of spirits, we cannot doubt; and if th_endency of them seems to be to warn us of danger, why should we not suppos_hey are from some friendly agent (whether supreme, or inferior an_ubordinate, is not the question), and that they are given for our good?
  • The present question abundantly confirms me in the justice of this reasoning;
  • for had I not been made cautious by this secret admonition, come it fro_hence it will, I had been done inevitably, and in a far worse condition tha_efore, as you will see presently. I had not kept myself long in this postur_ill I saw the boat draw near the shore, as if they looked for a creek t_hrust in at, for the convenience of landing; however, as they did not com_uite far enough, they did not see the little inlet where I formerly landed m_afts, but ran their boat on shore upon the beach, at about half a mile fro_e, which was very happy for me; for otherwise they would have landed just a_y door, as I may say, and would soon have beaten me out of my castle, an_erhaps have plundered me of all I had. When they were on shore I was full_atisfied they were Englishmen, at least most of them; one or two I though_ere Dutch, but it did not prove so; there were in all eleven men, whereo_hree of them I found were unarmed and, as I thought, bound; and when th_irst four or five of them were jumped on shore, they took those three out o_he boat as prisoners: one of the three I could perceive using the mos_assionate gestures of entreaty, affliction, and despair, even to a kind o_xtravagance; the other two, I could perceive, lifted up their hand_ometimes, and appeared concerned indeed, but not to such a degree as th_irst. I was perfectly confounded at the sight, and knew not what the meanin_f it should be. Friday called out to me in English, as well as he could, “_aster! you see English mans eat prisoner as well as savage mans.” “Why,
  • Friday,” says I, “do you think they are going to eat them, then?” “Yes,” say_riday, “they will eat them.” “No no,” says I, “Friday; I am afraid they wil_urder them, indeed; but you may be sure they will not eat them.”
  • All this while I had no thought of what the matter really was, but stoo_rembling with the horror of the sight, expecting every moment when the thre_risoners should be killed; nay, once I saw one of the villains lift up hi_rm with a great cutlass, as the seamen call it, or sword, to strike one o_he poor men; and I expected to see him fall every moment; at which all th_lood in my body seemed to run chill in my veins. I wished heartily now fo_he Spaniard, and the savage that had gone with him, or that I had any way t_ave come undiscovered within shot of them, that I might have secured th_hree men, for I saw no firearms they had among them; but it fell out to m_ind another way. After I had observed the outrageous usage of the three me_y the insolent seamen, I observed the fellows run scattering about th_sland, as if they wanted to see the country. I observed that the three othe_en had liberty to go also where they pleased; but they sat down all thre_pon the ground, very pensive, and looked like men in despair. This put me i_ind of the first time when I came on shore, and began to look about me; how _ave myself over for lost; how wildly I looked round me; what dreadfu_pprehensions I had; and how I lodged in the tree all night for fear of bein_evoured by wild beasts. As I knew nothing that night of the supply I was t_eceive by the providential driving of the ship nearer the land by the storm_nd tide, by which I have since been so long nourished and supported; so thes_hree poor desolate men knew nothing how certain of deliverance and suppl_hey were, how near it was to them, and how effectually and really they wer_n a condition of safety, at the same time that they thought themselves los_nd their case desperate. So little do we see before us in the world, and s_uch reason have we to depend cheerfully upon the great Maker of the world,
  • that He does not leave His creatures so absolutely destitute, but that in th_orst circumstances they have always something to be thankful for, an_ometimes are nearer deliverance than they imagine; nay, are even brought t_heir deliverance by the means by which they seem to be brought to thei_estruction.
  • It was just at high-water when these people came on shore; and while the_ambled about to see what kind of a place they were in, they had carelessl_tayed till the tide was spent, and the water was ebbed considerably away,
  • leaving their boat aground. They had left two men in the boat, who, as I foun_fterwards, having drunk a little too much brandy, fell asleep; however, on_f them waking a little sooner than the other and finding the boat too fas_ground for him to stir it, hallooed out for the rest, who were stragglin_bout: upon which they all soon came to the boat: but it was past all thei_trength to launch her, the boat being very heavy, and the shore on that sid_eing a soft oozy sand, almost like a quicksand. In this condition, like tru_eamen, who are, perhaps, the least of all mankind given to forethought, the_ave it over, and away they strolled about the country again; and I heard on_f them say aloud to another, calling them off from the boat, “Why, let he_lone, Jack, can't you? she'll float next tide;” by which I was full_onfirmed in the main inquiry of what countrymen they were. All this while _ept myself very close, not once daring to stir out of my castle any farthe_han to my place of observation near the top of the hill: and very glad I wa_o think how well it was fortified. I knew it was no less than ten hour_efore the boat could float again, and by that time it would be dark, and _ight be at more liberty to see their motions, and to hear their discourse, i_hey had any. In the meantime I fitted myself up for a battle as before,
  • though with more caution, knowing I had to do with another kind of enemy tha_ had at first. I ordered Friday also, whom I had made an excellent marksma_ith his gun, to load himself with arms. I took myself two fowling-pieces, an_ gave him three muskets. My figure, indeed, was very fierce; I had m_ormidable goat-skin coat on, with the great cap I have mentioned, a nake_word by my side, two pistols in my belt, and a gun upon each shoulder.
  • It was my design, as I said above, not to have made any attempt till it wa_ark; but about two o'clock, being the heat of the day, I found that they wer_ll gone straggling into the woods, and, as I thought, laid down to sleep. Th_hree poor distressed men, too anxious for their condition to get any sleep,
  • had, however, sat down under the shelter of a great tree, at about a quarte_f a mile from me, and, as I thought, out of sight of any of the rest. Upo_his I resolved to discover myself to them, and learn something of thei_ondition; immediately I marched as above, my man Friday at a good distanc_ehind me, as formidable for his arms as I, but not making quite so staring _pectre-like figure as I did. I came as near them undiscovered as I could, an_hen, before any of them saw me, I called aloud to them in Spanish, “What ar_e, gentlemen?” They started up at the noise, but were ten times mor_onfounded when they saw me, and the uncouth figure that I made. They made n_nswer at all, but I thought I perceived them just going to fly from me, whe_ spoke to them in English. “Gentlemen,” said I, “do not be surprised at me;
  • perhaps you may have a friend near when you did not expect it.” “He must b_ent directly from heaven then,” said one of them very gravely to me, an_ulling off his hat at the same time to me; “for our condition is past th_elp of man.” “All help is from heaven, sir,” said I, “but can you put _tranger in the way to help you? for you seem to be in some great distress. _aw you when you landed; and when you seemed to make application to the brute_hat came with you, I saw one of them lift up his sword to kill you.”
  • The poor man, with tears running down his face, and trembling, looking lik_ne astonished, returned, “Am I talking to God or man? Is it a real man or a_ngel?” “Be in no fear about that, sir,” said I; “if God had sent an angel t_elieve you, he would have come better clothed, and armed after another manne_han you see me; pray lay aside your fears; I am a man, an Englishman, an_isposed to assist you; you see I have one servant only; we have arms an_mmunition; tell us freely, can we serve you? What is your case?” “Our case,
  • sir,” said he, “is too long to tell you while our murderers are so near us;
  • but, in short, sir, I was commander of that ship - my men have mutinie_gainst me; they have been hardly prevailed on not to murder me, and, at last,
  • have set me on shore in this desolate place, with these two men with me - on_y mate, the other a passenger - where we expected to perish, believing th_lace to be uninhabited, and know not yet what to think of it.” “Where ar_hese brutes, your enemies?” said I; “do you know where they are gone? Ther_hey lie, sir,” said he, pointing to a thicket of trees; “my heart tremble_or fear they have seen us and heard you speak; if they have, they wil_ertainly murder us all.” “Have they any firearms?” said I. He answered, “The_ad only two pieces, one of which they left in the boat.” “Well, then,” sai_, “leave the rest to me; I see they are all asleep; it is an easy thing t_ill them all; but shall we rather take them prisoners?” He told me there wer_wo desperate villains among them that it was scarce safe to show any merc_o; but if they were secured, he believed all the rest would return to thei_uty. I asked him which they were. He told me he could not at that distanc_istinguish them, but he would obey my orders in anything I would direct.
  • “Well,” says I, “let us retreat out of their view or hearing, lest they awake,
  • and we will resolve further.” So they willingly went back with me, till th_oods covered us from them.
  • “Look you, sir,” said I, “if I venture upon your deliverance, are you willin_o make two conditions with me?” He anticipated my proposals by telling m_hat both he and the ship, if recovered, should be wholly directed an_ommanded by me in everything; and if the ship was not recovered, he woul_ive and die with me in what part of the world soever I would send him; an_he two other men said the same. “Well,” says I, “my conditions are but two;
  • first, that while you stay in this island with me, you will not pretend to an_uthority here; and if I put arms in your hands, you will, upon all occasions,
  • give them up to me, and do no prejudice to me or mine upon this island, and i_he meantime be governed by my orders; secondly, that if the ship is or may b_ecovered, you will carry me and my man to England passage free.”
  • He gave me all the assurances that the invention or faith of man could devis_hat he would comply with these most reasonable demands, and besides would ow_is life to me, and acknowledge it upon all occasions as long as he lived.
  • “Well, then,” said I, “here are three muskets for you, with powder and ball;
  • tell me next what you think is proper to be done.” He showed all th_estimonies of his gratitude that he was able, but offered to be wholly guide_y me. I told him I thought it was very hard venturing anything; but the bes_ethod I could think of was to fire on them at once as they lay, and if an_ere not killed at the first volley, and offered to submit, we might sav_hem, and so put it wholly upon God's providence to direct the shot. He said,
  • very modestly, that he was loath to kill them if he could help it; but tha_hose two were incorrigible villains, and had been the authors of all th_utiny in the ship, and if they escaped, we should be undone still, for the_ould go on board and bring the whole ship's company, and destroy us all.
  • “Well, then,” says I, “necessity legitimates my advice, for it is the only wa_o save our lives.” However, seeing him still cautious of shedding blood, _old him they should go themselves, and manage as they found convenient.
  • In the middle of this discourse we heard some of them awake, and soon after w_aw two of them on their feet. I asked him if either of them were the heads o_he mutiny? He said, “No.” “Well, then,” said I, “you may let them escape; an_rovidence seems to have awakened them on purpose to save themselves. Now,”
  • says I, “if the rest escape you, it is your fault.” Animated with this, h_ook the musket I had given him in his hand, and a pistol in his belt, and hi_wo comrades with him, with each a piece in his hand; the two men who wer_ith him going first made some noise, at which one of the seamen who was awak_urned about, and seeing them coming, cried out to the rest; but was too lat_hen, for the moment he cried out they fired - I mean the two men, the captai_isely reserving his own piece. They had so well aimed their shot at the me_hey knew, that one of them was killed on the spot, and the other very muc_ounded; but not being dead, he started up on his feet, and called eagerly fo_elp to the other; but the captain stepping to him, told him it was too lat_o cry for help, he should call upon God to forgive his villainy, and wit_hat word knocked him down with the stock of his musket, so that he neve_poke more; there were three more in the company, and one of them was slightl_ounded. By this time I was come; and when they saw their danger, and that i_as in vain to resist, they begged for mercy. The captain told them he woul_pare their lives if they would give him an assurance of their abhorrence o_he treachery they had been guilty of, and would swear to be faithful to hi_n recovering the ship, and afterwards in carrying her back to Jamaica, fro_hence they came. They gave him all the protestations of their sincerity tha_ould be desired; and he was willing to believe them, and spare their lives,
  • which I was not against, only that I obliged him to keep them bound hand an_oot while they were on the island.
  • While this was doing, I sent Friday with the captain's mate to the boat wit_rders to secure her, and bring away the oars and sails, which they did; an_y-and-by three straggling men, that were (happily for them) parted from th_est, came back upon hearing the guns fired; and seeing the captain, who wa_efore their prisoner, now their conqueror, they submitted to be bound also;
  • and so our victory was complete.
  • It now remained that the captain and I should inquire into one another'_ircumstances. I began first, and told him my whole history, which he hear_ith an attention even to amazement - and particularly at the wonderful manne_f my being furnished with provisions and ammunition; and, indeed, as my stor_s a whole collection of wonders, it affected him deeply. But when h_eflected from thence upon himself, and how I seemed to have been preserve_here on purpose to save his life, the tears ran down his face, and he coul_ot speak a word more. After this communication was at an end, I carried hi_nd his two men into my apartment, leading them in just where I came out, viz.
  • at the top of the house, where I refreshed them with such provisions as I had,
  • and showed them all the contrivances I had made during my long, lon_nhabiting that place.
  • All I showed them, all I said to them, was perfectly amazing; but above all,
  • the captain admired my fortification, and how perfectly I had concealed m_etreat with a grove of trees, which having been now planted nearly twent_ears, and the trees growing much faster than in England, was become a littl_ood, so thick that it was impassable in any part of it but at that one sid_here I had reserved my little winding passage into it. I told him this was m_astle and my residence, but that I had a seat in the country, as most prince_ave, whither I could retreat upon occasion, and I would show him that to_nother time; but at present our business was to consider how to recover th_hip. He agreed with me as to that, but told me he was perfectly at a los_hat measures to take, for that there were still six-and-twenty hands o_oard, who, having entered into a cursed conspiracy, by which they had al_orfeited their lives to the law, would be hardened in it now by desperation,
  • and would carry it on, knowing that if they were subdued they would be brough_o the gallows as soon as they came to England, or to any of the Englis_olonies, and that, therefore, there would be no attacking them with so smal_ number as we were.
  • I mused for some time on what he had said, and found it was a very rationa_onclusion, and that therefore something was to be resolved on speedily, a_ell to draw the men on board into some snare for their surprise as to preven_heir landing upon us, and destroying us. Upon this, it presently occurred t_e that in a little while the ship's crew, wondering what was become of thei_omrades and of the boat, would certainly come on shore in their other boat t_ook for them, and that then, perhaps, they might come armed, and be to_trong for us: this he allowed to be rational. Upon this, I told him the firs_hing we had to do was to stave the boat which lay upon the beach, so tha_hey might not carry her of, and taking everything out of her, leave her s_ar useless as not to be fit to swim. Accordingly, we went on board, took th_rms which were left on board out of her, and whatever else we found there -
  • which was a bottle of brandy, and another of rum, a few biscuit-cakes, a hor_f powder, and a great lump of sugar in a piece of canvas (the sugar was fiv_r six pounds): all which was very welcome to me, especially the brandy an_ugar, of which I had had none left for many years.
  • When we had carried all these things on shore (the oars, mast, sail, an_udder of the boat were carried away before), we knocked a great hole in he_ottom, that if they had come strong enough to master us, yet they could no_arry off the boat. Indeed, it was not much in my thoughts that we could b_ble to recover the ship; but my view was, that if they went away without th_oat, I did not much question to make her again fit to carry as to the Leewar_slands, and call upon our friends the Spaniards in my way, for I had the_till in my thoughts.