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Chapter 20 The Wizard Finds an Enchantment

  • After Kaliko had failed in his attempts to destroy his guests, as has bee_elated, the Nome King did nothing more to injure them but treated them in _riendly manner. He refused, however, to permit Inga to see or to speak wit_is father and mother, or even to know in what part of the underground cavern_hey were confined.
  • "You are able to protect your lives and persons, I freely admit," said Kaliko;
  • "but I firmly believe you have no power, either of magic or otherwise, to tak_rom me the captives I have agreed to keep for King Gos."
  • Inga would not agree to this. He determined not to leave the caverns until h_ad liberated his father and mother, although he did not then know how tha_ould be accomplished. As for Rinkitink, the jolly King was well fed and had _ood bed to sleep upon, so he was not worrying about anything and seemed in n_urry to go away.
  • Kaliko and Rinkitink were engaged in pitching a game with solid gold quoits,
  • on the floor of the royal chamber, and Inga and Bilbil were watching them,
  • when Klik came running in, his hair standing on end with excitement, and crie_ut that the Wizard of Oz and Dorothy were approaching.
  • Kaliko turned pale on hearing this unwelcome news and, abandoning his game,
  • went to sit in his ivory throne and try to think what had brought thes_earful visitors to his domain.
  • "Who is Dorothy?" asked Inga.
  • "She is a little girl who once lived in Kansas," replied Klik, with a shudder,
  • "but she now lives in Ozma's palace at the Emerald City and is a Princess o_z — which means that she is a terrible foe to deal with."
  • "Doesn't she like the nomes?" inquired the boy.
  • "It isn't that," said King Kaliko, with a groan, "but she insists on the nome_eing goody-goody, which is contrary to their natures. Dorothy gets angry if _o the least thing that is wicked, and tries to make me stop it, and tha_aturally makes me downhearted. I can't imagine why she has come here jus_ow, for I've been behaving very well lately. As for that Wizard of Oz, he'_hock-full of magic that I can't overcome, for he learned it from Glinda, wh_s the most powerful sorceress in the world. Woe is me! Why didn't Dorothy an_he Wizard stay in Oz, where they belong?"
  • Inga and Rinkitink listened to this with much joy, for at once the idea cam_o them both to plead with Dorothy to help them. Even Bilbil pricked up hi_ars when he heard the Wizard of Oz mentioned, and the goat seemed much les_urly, and more thoughtful than usual.
  • A few minutes later a nome came to say that Dorothy and the Wizard had arrive_nd demanded admittance, so Klik was sent to usher them into the roya_resence of the Nome King.
  • As soon as she came in the little girl ran up to the boy Prince and seize_oth his hands.
  • "Oh, Inga!" she exclaimed, "I'm so glad to find you alive and well."
  • Inga was astonished at so warm a greeting. Making a low bow he said:
  • "I don't think we have met before, Princess."
  • "No, indeed," replied Dorothy, "but I know all about you and I've come to hel_ou and King Rinkitink out of your troubles." Then she turned to the Nome Kin_nd continued: "You ought to be ashamed of yourself, King Kaliko, to treat a_onest Prince and an honest King so badly."
  • "I haven't done anything to them," whined Kaliko, trembling as her eye_lashed upon him.
  • "No; but you tried to, an' that's just as bad, if not worse," said Dorothy,
  • who was very indignant. "And now I want you to send for the King and Queen o_ingaree and have them brought here immejitly!"
  • "I won't," said Kaliko.
  • "Yes, you will!" cried Dorothy, stamping her foot at him. "I won't have thos_oor people made unhappy any longer, or separated from their little boy. Why,
  • it's dreadful, Kaliko, an' I'm su'prised at you. You must be more wicked tha_ thought you were."
  • "I can't do it, Dorothy," said the Nome King, almost weeping with despair. "_romised King Gos I'd keep them captives. You wouldn't ask me to break m_romise, would you?"
  • "King Gos was a robber and an outlaw," she said, "and p'r'aps you don't kno_hat a storm at sea wrecked his boat, while he was going back to Regos, an_hat he and Queen Cor were both drowned."
  • "Dear me!" exclaimed Kaliko. "Is that so?"
  • "I saw it in Glinda's Record Book," said Dorothy. "So now you trot out th_ing and Queen of Pingaree as quick as you can."
  • "No," persisted the contrary Nome King, shaking his head. "I won't do it. As_e anything else and I'll try to please you, but I can't allow these friendl_nemies to triumph over me.
  • "In that case," said Dorothy, beginning to remove the cover from her basket,
  • "I'll show you some eggs."
  • "Eggs!" screamed the Nome King in horror. "Have you eggs in that basket?"
  • "A dozen of 'em," replied Dorothy.
  • "Then keep them there — I beg — I implore you! — and I'll do anything yo_ay," pleaded Kaliko, his teeth chattering so that he could hardly speak.
  • "Send for the King and Queen of Pingaree," said Dorothy.
  • "Go, Klik," commanded the Nome King, and Klik ran away in great haste, for h_as almost as much frightened as his master.
  • It was an affecting scene when the unfortunate King and Queen of Pingare_ntered the chamber and with sobs and tears of joy embraced their brave an_dventurous son. All the others stood silent until greetings and kisses ha_een exchanged and Inga had told his parents in a few words of his vai_truggles to rescue them and how Princess Dorothy had finally come to hi_ssistance.
  • Then King Kitticut shook the hands of his friend King Rinkitink and thanke_im for so loyally supporting his son Inga, and Queen Garee kissed littl_orothy's forehead and blessed her for restoring her husband and herself t_reedom.
  • The Wizard had been standing near Bilbil the goat and now he was surprised t_ear the animal say:
  • "Joyful reunion, isn't it? But it makes me tired to see grown people cry lik_hildren."
  • "Oho!" exclaimed the Wizard. "How does it happen, Mr. Goat, that you, who hav_ever been to the Land of Oz, are able to talk?"
  • "That's my business," returned Bilbil in a surly tone.
  • The Wizard stooped down and gazed fixedly into the animal's eyes. Then h_aid, with a pitying sigh: "I see; you are under an enchantment. Indeed, _elieve you to be Prince Bobo of Boboland."
  • Bilbil made no reply but dropped his head as if ashamed.
  • "This is a great discovery," said the Wizard, addressing Dorothy and th_thers of the party. "A good many years ago a cruel magician transformed th_allant Prince of Boboland into a talking goat, and this goat, being ashame_f his condition, ran away and was never after seen in Boboland, which is _ountry far to the south of here but bordering on the Deadly Desert, opposit_he Land of Oz. I heard of this story long ago and know that a diligent searc_as been made for the enchanted Prince, without result. But I am well assure_hat, in the animal you call Bilbil, I have discovered the unhappy Prince o_oboland."
  • "Dear me, Bilbil," said Rinkitink, "why have you never told me this?"
  • "What would be the use?" asked Bilbil in a low voice and still refusing t_ook up.
  • "The use?" repeated Rinkitink, puzzled.
  • "Yes, that's the trouble," said the Wizard. "It is one of the most powerfu_nchantments ever accomplished, and the magician is now dead and the secret o_he anti-charm lost. Even I, with all my skill, cannot restore Prince Bobo t_is proper form. But I think Glinda might be able to do so and if you will al_eturn with Dorothy and me to the Land of Oz, where Ozma will make yo_elcome, I will ask Glinda to try to break this enchantment."
  • This was willingly agreed to, for they all welcomed the chance to visit th_amous Land of Oz. So they bade good-bye to King Kaliko, whom Dorothy warne_ot to be wicked any more if he could help it, and the entire party returne_ver the Magic Carpet to the Land of Oz. They filled the Red Wagon, which wa_till waiting for them, pretty full; but the Sawhorse didn't mind that an_ith wonderful speed carried them safely to the Emerald City.