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Chapter 19 HOME WITH DRAKE.

  • During our awful captivity on board the galleon we had well-nigh lost al_ount or notion of time. To us one day was pretty much like another. If w_lept it was only to be awakened by the overseer’s whip. Day or night it wa_ll one with us; never did our tormentors cease to afflict us. We were reduce_o the condition of animals, and had not even the comfort which is allowed t_hem. Thus when the time of our rescue came, we had no notion of where we wer_r what part of the year it was.
  • We now found that it was the middle of August, and that we were in the Nort_acific Ocean and bearing direct for the Moluccas, where Drake intended t_rade before continuing his voyage homeward by way of the Cape. We also learn_hat this great captain was now taking his first voyage round the world, an_hat he had had many great and remarkable adventures on the Spanish Main an_n the coast of Peru, and had enriched his vessels with the spoils of Spanis_reasure-ships, so that he now had with him a store of great and unusua_alue. For from some ships he had taken bars of silver, and from others block_f gold, together with rich ladings, merchandise and silks, so rare an_urious as to be worth great sums of money. And all this treasure had bee_hiefly won from the Spaniards in fair fight, and that without any cruelty o_ust of blood or revenge.
  • About the thirteenth day of September we came within view of some islands,
  • situated about eight degrees northward from the line. From these the islander_ame out to us in canoes hollowed out of solid trunks of a tree, and raise_ery high out of the water at both ends, so that they almost formed _emicircle. These canoes were polished so highly that they shone like ebony,
  • and were kept steady by pieces of timber fixed on each side of them by stron_anes, fastened at one end to the canoe, and at the other to the timber.
  • The first company that came out to us brought fruits, potatoes, and othe_ommodities, none of any great value, and seemed anxious to trade with us,
  • making a great show of good-will and honesty. Soon after, however, they sen_ut another fleet of canoes, the crews of which showed themselves to b_othing better than thieves, for if we placed anything in their hands the_mmediately considered it to belong to them, and would neither restore nor pa_or it. Upon this we were obliged to get rid of them, which we did b_ischarging a gun. As they had never seen ordnance discharged before they wer_astly astonished by this, and fled precipitately to the shore, having firs_elted us with showers of stones which they carried in their canoes.
  • On the fifth of November we cast anchor before Ternate, and had scarce arrive_hen the viceroy of that place, attended by the chief nobles, came out i_hree boats, rowed by forty men on each side. Soon afterwards appeared th_ing himself, attended by a large and imposing retinue. Him we received wit_ischarges of cannon and musketry, together with various kinds of music, wit_hich he was so highly delighted that he would have the musicians down int_is own boat. At this place we stayed some days, trafficking with th_nhabitants, who brought us large quantities of provisions, and behaved to u_ith civility. After that we repaired to a neighboring island, and there foun_ commodious harbor where we repaired the Golden Hinde, and did ourselve_njoy a much-needed rest.
  • Leaving this place on the 12th day of December, we sailed southwards toward_he Celebes; but the wind being against us, we drifted about among a multitud_f islands mingled with shallows until the middle of January. And now we me_ith an adventure which was like to have stayed our further progress and put _ummary end to all our hopes. For sailing forward under a strong gale we wer_ne night suddenly surprised by a shock, caused by our being thrown upon _hoal, on which the speed of our course served to fix us very fast. Upo_xamination we found that the rock on which we had struck rose perpendicularl_rom the water, and there was no anchorage, nor any bottom to be found fo_ome distance. On making this discovery we lightened the ship by throwing int_he sea a not inconsiderable portion of her lading. Even then the ship seeme_opelessly fast, and we had almost given way to despair when we were on _udden relieved by a remission of the wind, which, having hitherto blow_trongly against that side of the ship which lay towards the sea, holding i_pright against the rock, now slackened, and blowing no longer against ou_essel allowed it to reel into deep water, to our great comfort and relief. W_ad enjoyed so little hope of ever extricating ourselves from this perilou_osition, that Drake had caused the sacrament to be administered to us as i_e had been on the point of death, and now that we were mercifully set free w_ang a Te Deum and went forward very cautiously, hardly daring to set sail_est we should chance upon some reef still more dangerous.
  • We now continued our voyage without any remarkable occurrence or adventure,
  • until about the middle of March we came to anchor off the Island of Java.
  • Having sent to the king a present of clothes and silks, we received from hi_n return a quantity of provisions; and on the following day Drake himsel_ent on shore, and after entertaining the king with music obtained leave fro_im to forage for fresh food. Here, then, we remained some days, taking i_rovisions, and being visited by the princes and head men of that country, an_ater by the king, all of whom manifested great interest in us, and in ou_rmaments and instruments of navigation.
  • Leaving Java about the end of March we sailed for the Cape of Good Hope, whic_e sighted about the middle of June. During all that time we met with no ver_emarkable adventure; nevertheless, because we were sailing through seas whic_o Englishman had ever previously traversed there was not a day which did no_resent some feature of interest to us, or add to our knowledge of thos_trange parts of the world. To me, and to such of my companions as ha_uffered with me in the dungeons of the Inquisition or on the deck of th_alleon, this voyage was as a glimpse of Paradise. For we were treated wit_he utmost kindness and consideration by Drake and his men, and they would no_uffer us to undertake anything in the shape of work until our wounds wer_airly healed and our strength recruited. To those of us who had suffered s_itterly that our strength was well-nigh departed, this welcome relief wa_ery grateful. As for me, on discovering my condition I was rated with Drak_nd his officers, and with them did spend many exceeding pleasant hours,
  • listening to their marvelous adventures and stories of fights with our ol_nemies, the Spaniards. But Pharaoh, hating to do naught, applied for _ating, and so they made him boatswain’s mate, and thenceforth he was happy,
  • and seemed quickly to forget the many privations and discomforts which he an_ had undergone.
  • So on the third week of September, 1580, we came to Plymouth Sound, and onc_ore looked upon English land and English faces. And this we did with suc_hankfulness and rejoicing as you cannot conceive. As for Drake and his men,
  • they had been away two years and some ten months, and in that time had take_heir ships round the world. And because they were the first Englishmen tha_ad ever done this, there was such ringing of bells, and lighting of bonfires,
  • and setting up of feasts and jollities as had never been known in England.
  • From the queen to the meanest hind there was nobody that did not join in th_eneral rejoicing. Wherefore, at Plymouth, where we landed, there were grea_tirrings, and men clung around us to hear our marvelous tales and adventures.
  • And as for Drake himself, the queen soon afterwards made him a knight on th_eck of the Golden Hinde; and so he became Sir Francis, and thereafter di_any wonderful deeds which are set forth in the chronicles of that time.
  • Now, I no sooner set foot upon English soil than I was immediately consume_ith impatience to go home to Beechcot, and therefore I sought out Drake an_egged him to let me begone.
  • “Why,” quoth he, “knowing your story as I do, Master Salkeld, I make no wonde_hat you should be in some haste to return to your own friends. I pray Go_hat you may find all well with them.”
  • Then he generously pressed upon me a sum of money in gold, wherewith to fi_yself out for the journey and defray my expenses on the way; and for thi_indness I was deeply grateful, seeing that I was utterly penniless, and owe_he very garments I then wore to the charity of one of his officers. So I sai_arewell to him and his company, and begged them to remember me if we shoul_eet no more, and then I went to find Pharaoh Nanjulian.
  • “Pharaoh,” said I, when I came upon him on the deck of the Golden Hinde, “I a_oing home.”
  • He pushed back his cap and scratched his head and looked at me.
  • “Aye,” he said, “I supposed it would be so, master. As for me, I have no hom_o go to. My mother is dead and buried in Marazion churchyard, and I hav_either kith nor kin in the wide world.”
  • “Come with me to Beechcot,” said I, “you shall abide there for the rest o_our days in peace and plenty.”
  • But he shook his head.
  • “Nay, master,” he answered, “that would never do. I am naught but a rough sea-
  • dog, and I should be too big and savage for a quiet life. Besides, yo_onstable of yours would be forever at my heels, fearing lest I should brea_he peace again.”
  • “There shall no man harm you if you will come with me,” said I. “Come and b_y man.”
  • “Nay, master, not so. Born and bred to the sea I was, and to the sea I wil_leave. Besides, I am Francis Drake’s man now, and with him I shall see rar_entures. Already there is talk of an expedition against the Spaniards. Tha_s the life for me.”
  • So there was no more to be said, and I gave him my hand sorrowfully, for h_ad proved a true friend.
  • “Good-bye, then, Pharaoh Nanjulian.”
  • “Good-bye, master. We have seen some rare ventures together. I thank God fo_ringing us safely out of them.”
  • “Amen! I shall not forget them or thee. And God grant we may meet again.”
  • So we pressed each other’s hands with full hearts, and I went away and lef_im gazing after me.