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Chapter 14 Ozma's Counsellors

  • No Ruler ever had such a queer assortment of advisers as the Princess Ozma ha_athered about her throne. Indeed, in no other country could such amazin_eople exist. But Ozma loved them for their peculiarities and could trus_very one of them.
  • First there was the Tin Woodman. Every bit of him was tin, brightly polished.
  • All his joints were kept well oiled and moved smoothly. He carried a gleamin_xe to prove he was a woodman, but seldom had cause to use it because he live_n a magnificent tin castle in the Winkie Country of Oz and was the Emperor o_ll the Winkies. The Tin Woodman's name was Nick Chopper. He had a very goo_ind, but his heart was not of much account, so he was very careful to d_othing unkind or to hurt anyone's feelings.
  • Another counsellor was Scraps, the Patchwork Girl of Oz, who was made of _audy patchwork quilt, cut into shape and stuffed with cotton. This Patchwor_irl was very intelligent, but so full of fun and mad pranks that a lot o_ore stupid folks thought she must be crazy. Scraps was jolly under al_onditions, however grave they might be, but her laughter and good spirit_ere of value in cheering others and in her seemingly careless remarks muc_isdom could often be found.
  • Then there was the Shaggy Man—shaggy from head to foot, hair and whiskers,
  • clothes and shoes—but very kind and gentle and one of Ozma's most loya_upporters.
  • Tik-Tok was there, a copper man with machinery inside him, so cleverl_onstructed that he moved, spoke and thought by three separate clock-works.
  • Tik-Tok was very reliable because he always did exactly what he was wound u_o do, but his machinery was liable to run down at times and then he was quit_elpless until wound up again.
  • A different sort of person was Jack Pumpkinhead, one of Ozma's oldest friend_nd her companion on many adventures. Jack's body was very crude and awkward,
  • being formed of limbs of trees of different sizes, jointed with wooden pegs.
  • But it was a substantial body and not likely to break or wear out, and when i_as dressed the clothes covered much of its roughness. The head of Jac_umpkinhead was, as you have guessed, a ripe pumpkin, with the eyes, nose an_outh carved upon one side. The pumpkin was stuck on Jack's wooden neck an_as liable to get turned sidewise or backward and then he would have t_traighten it with his wooden hands.
  • The worst thing about this sort of a head was that it did not keep well an_as sure to spoil sooner or later. So Jack's main business was to grow a fiel_f fine pumpkins each year, and always before his old head spoiled he woul_elect a fresh pumpkin from the field and carve the features on it ver_eatly, and have it ready to replace the old head whenever it becam_ecessary. He didn't always carve it the same way, so his friends never kne_xactly what sort of an expression they would find on his face. But there wa_o mistaking him, because he was the only pumpkin-headed man alive in the Lan_f Oz.
  • A one-legged sailor-man was a member of Ozma's council. His name was Cap'_ill and he had come to the Land of Oz with Trot, and had been made welcome o_ccount of his cleverness, honesty and good nature. He wore a wooden leg t_eplace the one he had lost and was a great friend of all the children in O_ecause he could whittle all sorts of toys out of wood with his big jack-
  • knife.
  • Professor H. M. Wogglebug, T. E., was another member of the council. The "H.
  • M." meant Highly Magnified, for the Professor was once a little bug, wh_ecame magnified to the size of a man and always remained so. The "T. E."
  • meant that he was Thoroughly Educated. He was at the head of Princess Ozma'_oyal Athletic College, and so that the students would not have to study an_o lose much time that could be devoted to athletic sports, such as football,
  • baseball and the like, Professor Wogglebug had invented the famous Educationa_ills. If one of the college students took a Geography Pill after breakfast,
  • he knew his geography lesson in an instant; if he took a Spelling Pill he a_nce knew his spelling lesson, and an Arithmetic Pill enabled the student t_o any kind of sum without having to think about it.
  • These useful pills made the college very popular and taught the boys and girl_f Oz their lessons in the easiest possible way. In spite of this, Professo_ogglebug was not a favorite outside his college, for he was very conceite_nd admired himself so much and displayed his cleverness and learning s_onstantly, that no one cared to associate with him. Ozma found him of valu_n her councils, nevertheless.
  • Perhaps the most splendidly dressed of all those present was a great frog a_arge as a man, called the Frogman, who was noted for his wise sayings. He ha_ome to the Emerald City from the Yip Country of Oz and was a guest of honor.
  • His long-tailed coat was of velvet, his vest of satin and his trousers o_inest silk. There were diamond buckles on his shoes and he carried a gold-
  • headed cane and a high silk hat. All of the bright colors were represented i_is rich attire, so it tired one's eyes to look at him for long, until on_ecame used to his splendor.
  • The best farmer in all Oz was Uncle Henry, who was Dorothy's own uncle, an_ho now lived near the Emerald City with his wife Aunt Em. Uncle Henry taugh_he Oz people how to grow the finest vegetables and fruits and grains and wa_f much use to Ozma in keeping the Royal Storehouses well filled. He, too, wa_ counsellor.
  • The reason I mention the little Wizard of Oz last is because he was the mos_mportant man in the Land of Oz. He wasn't a big man in size but he was a ma_n power and intelligence and second only to Glinda the Good in all the mysti_rts of magic. Glinda had taught him, and the Wizard and the Sorceress wer_he only ones in Oz permitted by law to practice wizardry and sorcery, whic_hey applied only to good uses and for the benefit of the people.
  • The Wizard wasn't exactly handsome but he was pleasant to look at. His bal_ead was as shiny as if it had been varnished; there was always a merr_winkle in his eyes and he was as spry as a schoolboy. Dorothy says the reaso_he Wizard is not as powerful as Glinda is because Glinda didn't teach him al_he knows, but what the Wizard knows he knows very well and so he perform_ome very remarkable magic. The ten I have mentioned assembled, with th_carecrow and Glinda, in Ozma's throne room, right after dinner that evening,
  • and the Sorceress told them all she knew of the plight of Ozma and Dorothy.
  • "Of course we must rescue them," she continued, "and the sooner they ar_escued the better pleased they will be; but what we must now determine is ho_hey can be saved. That is why I have called you together in council."
  • "The easiest way," remarked the Shaggy Man, "is to raise the sunken island o_he Skeezers to the top of the water again."
  • "Tell me how?" said Glinda.
  • "I don't know how, your Highness, for I have never raised a sunken island."
  • "We might all get under it and lift," suggested Professor Wogglebug.
  • "How can we get under it when it rests on the bottom of the lake?" asked th_orceress.
  • "Couldn't we throw a rope around it and pull it ashore?" inquired Jac_umpkinhead.
  • "Why not pump the water out of the lake?" suggested the Patchwork Girl with _augh.
  • "Do be sensible!" pleaded Glinda. "This is a serious matter, and we must giv_t serious thought."
  • "How big is the lake and how big is the island?" was the Frogman's question.
  • "None of us can tell, for we have not been there."
  • "In that case," said the Scarecrow, "it appears to me we ought to go to th_keezer country and examine it carefully."
  • "Quite right," agreed the Tin Woodman.
  • "We-will-have-to-go-there-any-how," remarked Tik-Tok in his jerky machin_oice.
  • "The question is which of us shall go, and how many of us?" said the Wizard.
  • "I shall go of course," declared the Scarecrow.
  • "And I," said Scraps.
  • "It is my duty to Ozma to go," asserted the Tin Woodman.
  • "I could not stay away, knowing our loved Princess is in danger," said th_izard.
  • "We all feel like that," Uncle Henry said.
  • Finally one and all present decided to go to the Skeezer country, with Glind_nd the little Wizard to lead them. Magic must meet magic in order to conque_t, so these two skillful magic-workers were necessary to insure the succes_f the expedition.
  • They were all ready to start at a moment's notice, for none had any affairs o_mportance to attend to. Jack was wearing a newly made Pumpkin-head and th_carecrow had recently been stuffed with fresh straw. Tik-Tok's machinery wa_n good running order and the Tin Woodman always was well oiled.
  • "It is quite a long journey," said Glinda, "and while I might travel quickl_o the Skeezer country by means of my stork chariot the rest of you will b_bliged to walk. So, as we must keep together, I will send my chariot back t_y castle and we will plan to leave the Emerald City at sunrise to-morrow."