Table of Contents

+ Add to Library

Previous Next

Chapter 19 Another arrest

  • Micky Maguire, as the reader will remember, was by no means satisfied with th_ompensation he received from Gilbert for his share in the plot which came s_ear proving disastrous to our friend Dick.
  • He felt that the book-keeper had acted meanly to him, and he meant to have hi_evenge if a good opportunity should ever offer. He was very much disappointe_o think he must do without the watch which he had set his heart upon. H_ould have felt no particular scruples against stealing it, but that would b_ather dangerous. He began to wish he had kept the pocket-book. Very probabl_t contained more than enough to buy the watch.
  • But, in spite of his disappointment, he had one satisfaction. He had avenge_imself upon Dick, whom he had long disliked. He knew nothing of Tim Ryan'_estimony, and supposed there was no doubt of Dick's conviction. He would lik_ery well to have been present at the trial; but he had unpleasan_ssociations connected with the court-room at the Tombs, having figured ther_n several occasions in an important but not very enviable capacity.
  • As he was standing by the park railings, his particular friend and admirer, Limpy Jim, came up.
  • "Mornin', Jim," said Micky. "What luck?"
  • "None at all," said Jim. "I haven't had a shine yet, and I'm precious hungry."
  • "Come and take breakfast with me," said Micky, in an unusual fit o_enerosity; for he was generally more willing to be treated than to treat.
  • "Have you got stamps enough?"
  • "Look at this," and Micky displayed the bill which he had received fro_ilbert.
  • "You're in luck, Micky. Did you make all that by shines?"
  • "Never mind how I made it. I guess it's good. Come along if you're hungry."
  • Limpy Jim followed Micky across Printing-House Square to a cheap restaurant o_assau Street, between Ann and Beekman Streets, and they were soon partakin_ith relish of a breakfast which, as they were not very fastidious, prove_bundantly satisfactory.
  • "I've got some news," said Micky, after he had drained his cup of coffee. "Yo_aven't forgot Ragged Dick, have ye?"
  • "He's set up for a gentleman. I saw him a week ago strutting round as if h_ived on Fifth Avenue."
  • "Well, he's set up for something else now."
  • "What's that?"
  • "A pick-pocket."
  • "What?" asked Jim, amazed.
  • "He stole an old chap's pocket-book yesterday afternoon, and I seed _oliceman haulin' him off to the p'lice station."
  • "That's where he gets his good clo'es from?" suggested Jim.
  • "Most likely. I expect he's on his way to the Island by this time."
  • "Serve him right for puttin' on airs. He won't pretend to be so much bette_han the rest of us now."
  • "Wonder what Tom Wilkins'll say? He's a great friend of Dick's."
  • "He's a sneak," said Micky.
  • "That's so. I wanted to borrer a shillin' of him last week, and he wouldn'_end it to me."
  • This Tom Wilkins was a boot-black like the two who were expressing s_nfavorable an opinion of his character. He had a mother and two sister_artially dependent upon him for support, and faithfully carried home all hi_arnings. This accounts for his being unwilling to lend Limpy Jim, who had n_ne to look out for but himself, and never considered it necessary to repa_orrowed money. Tom had reason to feel friendly to Dick, for on severa_ccasions, one of which is mentioned in the first volume of this series, Dic_ad given him help in time of need. He was always ready to defend Dick, whe_eviled by Micky and his followers, and had once or twice been attacked i_onsequence. Limpy Jim was right in supposing that nothing would disturb To_ore than to hear that his friend had got into trouble.
  • Micky, who was in a generous mood, bought a couple of cheap cigars, of whic_e presented one to his satellite. These were lighted, and both boys, feelin_ore comfortable for the hearty meal of which they had partaken, swaggered ou_nto the street.
  • They re-entered the park, and began to look out for patrons.
  • "There's Tom Wilkins now," said Limpy Jim.
  • Tom was busily engaged in imparting a scientific shine to the boots of an ol_entleman who was sitting on one of the wooden seats to be found in th_eighborhood of the City Hall.
  • When he had completed his task, and risen from his knees, Limpy Jim advance_owards him, and said, with a sneer, "I've heard fine news about your frien_ick."
  • "What's that?" asked Tom.
  • "He's got nabbed by a 'copp.'"
  • "I don't believe it," said Tom, incredulously.
  • "Isn't it so, Micky?" said Jim, appealing to his friend.
  • "Yes, it's true. I seed him hauled off for pickin' an old fellow's pocket i_hatham Street."
  • "I don't believe it," repeated Tom; but he began to feel a little uneasy. "_aw him and spoke to him yesterday mornin'."
  • "What if you did? It didn't happen till afternoon."
  • "Dick wouldn't steal," said Tom, stoutly.
  • "He'll find it mighty hard work provin' that he didn't," said Micky. "Yo_on't see him for the next three months."
  • "Why won't I?"
  • "Because he'll be at the Island. Maybe you'll go there yourself."
  • "If I do, it'll be for the first time," retorted Tom; "and that's more tha_ither of you can say."
  • As this happened to be true, it was of course regarded as offensive.
  • "Shut up, Tom Wilkins!" said Micky, "if you don't want a lickin'."
  • "None of your impudence!" said Limpy Jim, emboldened by the presence an_upport of Micky, who was taller and stronger than Tom.
  • "I've only told the truth," said Tom, "and you can't deny it."
  • "Take that for your impudence!" said Micky, drawing off, and hitting Tom _taggering blow on the side of the head.
  • Limpy Jim was about to assist Micky, when there was a very unlooked-fo_nterruption. Micky Maguire was seized by the collar, and, turnin_ndignantly, found himself in the grip of a policeman.
  • "So you are fighting, are you, my fine fellow?" demanded the guardian of th_ublic peace.
  • "He insulted me," said Micky, doggedly, not attempting resistance, which h_new would be ineffectual. "Didn't he, Jim?"
  • But Jim had already disappeared. He had a prejudice, easily accounted for, against the metropolitan police, and had as little communication with them a_ossible.
  • "I don't know anything about that," said the policeman. "All I know is tha_ou're wanted."
  • "Just for hittin' him? I didn't hurt him any."
  • "He didn't hurt me much," said Tom, generously, not desiring to see Micky ge_nto trouble on his account.
  • "He says I didn't hurt him," urged Micky. "Can't you let me go?"
  • "That isn't what I want you for," said the policeman.
  • Micky was astonished. The real cause of his arrest never once occurred to him, and he could not understand why he was "wanted."
  • "What is it, then?" he asked in some surprise. "What 'ave I been doin'?"
  • "Perhaps you don't remember relieving an old gentleman of his pocket-boo_esterday in Chatham Street."
  • "'Twasn't me."
  • "Who was it then?"
  • "Ragged Dick,—the feller that was took at the time. I seed him pick the man'_ocket."
  • "It seems that you remember something about it."
  • "But it was Dick that did it. If he says I did it, he lies."
  • "I've nothing to do with that. You must tell your story to the judge."
  • "Has he let Dick go?"
  • "Yes."
  • Micky received this intelligence with dismay. Somehow it had got out that h_as the real thief, and he began to think that his chance of getting off wa_mall. Just then, while in custody of the policeman, he saw advancing toward_im the man who had inveigled him into the plot,—Gilbert, the book-keeper. Hi_nger against Gilbert overcame his prudence, and he said, "Well, if I did tak_he pocket-book, I was paid for doin' it, and that was the man that hired me."
  • With some surprise, the policeman listened to this story.
  • "If you don't believe me, just wait till I speak to him."
  • "Mr. Gilbert!" called Micky.
  • Gilbert, who had not till now noticed his confederate, looked up, and, rapidl_nderstanding what had happened, determined upon his course.
  • "Who speaks to me?" he said, quietly.
  • "You've got me into trouble, Mr. Gilbert," said Micky, "and I want you to ge_e out of it."
  • "What does he mean?" asked Gilbert, coolly, addressing the policeman.
  • "You hired me to steal a man's pocket-book, and I'm took up for it," sai_icky. "I want you to help me, or I'll be sent to the Island."
  • "The boy must be crazy," said Gilbert, shrugging his shoulders.
  • "You give me a dollar to do it," said Micky, very much incensed at th_esertion of his confederate.
  • "Do you know the boy?" asked the policeman respectfully, for he put no fait_n Micky's statement.
  • "He blacked my boots once," said Gilbert. "That's all I know about him. Wha_s he arrested for?"
  • "For picking pockets. There was another boy arrested on suspicion, but i_ppeared on trial that he was innocent, and that this boy really took th_allet."
  • "He looks like a young scamp," said Gilbert, coolly. "I'm much obliged to hi_or introducing my name into the matter. I hope he'll get his desserts."
  • This was too much for Micky's patience. He assailed Gilbert with such a showe_f oaths that the policeman tightened his grip, and shook him vigorously.
  • Gilbert shrugged his shoulders, and walked off with apparent unconcern.
  • "Wait till I get free," said Micky, furiously. "I'll fix him."
  • In regard to Micky, I have only to say further at this time, that he was a_nce conveyed to the Tombs, summarily tried and convicted, and spent the sam_ight on Blackwell's Island, where we leave him for three months.