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Chapter 12 Describes a Terrific and Unequal Combat.

  • “Now, kinsman, let me endeavour to convince thee of thy folly,” said Jar_ongvold to Erling, on the morning that followed the evening in which th_nterview with the King had taken place, as they walked in front of the hous_ogether.
  • “It needs no great power of speech to convince me of that,” said Erling. “Th_act that I am still here, after what the King let out last night, convince_e, without your aid, that I am a fool.”
  • “And pray what said he that has had such powerful influence on thine obtus_ind?”
  • “Truly he said little, but he expressed much. He gave way to an unreasonabl_urst of passion when I did but claim justice and assert our rights; and th_an must be slow-witted indeed who could believe that subdued passion i_hanged opinion. However, I will wait for another interview until the sun i_n the zenith—after that I leave, whatever be the consequences. So it wer_ell, kinsman, that you should see and advise with your  _master_.”
  • The jarl bit his lip, and was on the point of turning away without replying, when a remarkably stout and tall young man walked up and accosted them.
  • “This is my son Rolf,” said the jarl, turning round hastily.—“Our kinsman, Erling the Bold. I go to attend the King. Make the most of each other, for y_re not likely to be long in company.”
  • “Are you that Rolf who is styled Ganger?” enquired Erling with some interest.
  • “Aye,” replied the other gruffly. “At least I am Rolf. Men choose to call m_anger because I prefer to gang on my legs rather than gang on the legs of _orse. They say it is because no horse can carry me; but thou seest that tha_s a lie, for I am not much heavier than thyself.”
  • “I should like to know thee better, kinsman,” said Erling.
  • Rolf Ganger did not respond so heartily to this as Erling wished, and he fel_uch disappointed; for, being a man who did not often express his feelings, h_elt all the more keenly anything like a rebuff.
  • “What is your business with the King?” asked Rolf, after a short pause.
  • “To defy him,” said our hero, under the influence of a burst of mingle_eelings.
  • Rolf Ganger looked at Erling in surprise.
  • “Thou dost not like the King, then?”
  • “I hate him!”
  • “So do I,” said Rolf.
  • This interchange of sentiment seemed to break down the barriers of diffidenc_hich had hitherto existed between the two, for from that moment their tal_as earnest and confidential. Erling tried to get Rolf to desert the King’_ause and join his opponents, but the latter shook his head, and said tha_hey had no chance of success; and that it was of no use joining a hopeles_ause, even although he had strong sympathy with it. While they wer_onversing, Jarl Rongvold came out and summoned Erling to the presence of th_ing.
  • This was the first and last interview that our hero had with that Rolf Ganger, whose name—although not much celebrated at that time—was destined to appear i_he pages of history as that of the conqueror of Normandy, and the progenito_f line of English kings.
  • “I have sent for thee, Erling,” said the King, in a voice so soft, yet s_onstrained, that Erling could not avoid seeing that it was forced, “to tel_hee thou art at liberty to return to thy dalesmen with this message—Kin_arald respects the opinions of the men of Horlingdal, and he will hold _hing at the Springs for the purpose of hearing their views more fully, stating his own, and consulting with them about the whole matter.—Ar_atisfied with that?” he asked, almost sternly.
  • “I will convey your message,” said Erling.
  • “And the sooner the better,” said the King. “By the way, there are two road_eading to the Springs, I am told; is it so?” he added.
  • “There are,” said Erling; “one goes by the uplands over the fells, the othe_hrough the forest.”
  • “Which would you recommend me to follow when I fare to the Springs?”
  • “The forest road is the best.”
  • “It is that which thou wilt follow, I suppose?”
  • “It is,” replied Erling.
  • “Well, get thee to horse, and make the most of thy time; my berserk here wil_uide thee past the guards.”
  • As he spoke, a man who had stood behind the King motionless as a statu_dvanced towards the door. He was one of a peculiar class of men who forme_art of the bodyguard of the King. On his head there was a plain steel helmet, but he wore no “serk”, or shirt of mail (hence the name of berserk, or bare o_erk), and he was, like the rest of his comrades, noted for being capable o_orking himself up into such a fury of madness while in action, that fe_eople of ordinary powers could stand before his terrible onset. He was calle_ake, the berserk of Hadeland, and was comparatively short in stature, bu_ooked shorter than he really was, in consequence of the unnatural breadth an_ulk of his chest and shoulders. Hake led Erling out to the door of the house, where they found Glumm waiting with two horses ready for the road.
  • “Thou art sharp this morning, Glumm.”
  • “Better to be too sharp than too blunt,” replied his friend. “It seemed to m_hat whatever should be the result of the talk with the King to-day, it wer_ell to be ready for the road in good time. What is yonder big-shouldere_ellow doing?”
  • “Hush, Glumm,” said Erling, with a smile, “thou must be respectful if tho_ouldst keep thy head on thy shoulders. That is Hake of Hadeland, Kin_arald’s famous berserk. He is to conduct us past the guards. I only hope h_ay not have been commissioned to cut off our heads on the way. But I thin_hat perchance you and I might manage him together, if our courage did no_ail us!”
  • Glumm replied with that expression of contempt which is usually styled turnin_p one’s nose, and Erling laughed as he mounted his horse and rode off at th_eels of the berserk. He had good reason to look grave, however, as he foun_ut a few moments later. Just as they were about to enter the forest, a voic_as heard shouting behind, and Jarl Rongvold was seen running after them.
  • “Ho! stay, kinsman, go not away without bidding us farewell. A safe and speed_ourney, lad, and give my good wishes to the old folk at Haldorstede. Say tha_ trust things may yet be happily arranged between the men of Horlingdal an_he King.”
  • As he spoke the jarl managed to move so that Erling’s horse came between hi_nd the berserk; then he said quickly, in a low but earnest whisper:
  • “The King means to play thee false, Erling. I cannot explain, but do thou b_ure to take  _the road by the fells_ , and let not the berserk know. Thy lif_epends on it. I am ordered to send this berserk with a troop of nineteen me_o waylay thee. They are to go  _by the forest road_.—There, thou canst no_oubt my friendship for thee, for now my life is in thy hands! Haste, tho_ast no chance against such odds. Farewell, Glumm,” he added aloud; “give m_espects to Ulf, when next ye see him.”
  • Jarl Rongvold waved his hand as he turned round and left his friends to pursu_heir way.
  • They soon reached the point where they had met the two guards on the previou_ay. After riding a little farther, so as to make sure of being beyond th_utmost patrol, the berserk reined up.
  • “Here I leave you to guard yourselves,” he said.
  • “Truly we are indebted to thee for thy guidance thus far,” said Erling.
  • “If you should still chance to meet with any of the guards, they will let yo_ass, no doubt.”
  • “No doubt,” replied Erling, with a laugh, “and, should they object, we hav_hat which will persuade them.”
  • He touched the hilt of his sword, and nodded good-humouredly to the berserk, who did not appear to relish the jest at all.
  • “Your road lies through the forest, I believe?” said Hake, pausing and lookin_ack as he was about to ride away.
  • “That depends on circumstances,” said Erling. “If the sun troubles me, I ma_o by the forest,—if not, I may go by the fells. But I never can tel_eforehand which way my fancy may lead, and I always follow it.”
  • So saying he put spurs to his horse and galloped away.
  • The berserk did the same, but it was evident that he was ill at ease, for h_rumbled very much, and complained a good deal of his ill luck. He did not, however, slacken his pace on that account, but rather increased it, until h_eached Rongvoldstede, where he hastily summoned nineteen armed men, mounted _resh horse, and, ordering them to follow, dashed back into the forest at ful_peed.
  • For some time he rode in silence by the side of a stout man who was hi_ubordinate officer.
  • “Krake,” he said at length, “I cannot make up my mind which road this Erlin_nd his comrade are likely to have taken, so, as we must not miss our men, th_ing’s commands being very positive, I intend to send thee by the mountai_oad with nine of the men, and go myself by the forest with the other nine. W_ill ride each at full speed, and will be sure to overtake them before the_each the split rock on the fells, or the double-stemmed pine in the forest.
  • If thou shalt fall in with them, keep them in play till I come up, for I wil_asten to join thee without delay after reaching the double pine. If I mee_hem I will give the attack at once, and thou wilt hasten to join me afte_assing the split rock. Now, away, for here our roads part.”
  • In accordance with this plan the troop was divided, and each portion rode of_t full speed.
  • Meanwhile Erling and Glumm pursued their way, chatting as they rode along, an_ausing occasionally to breathe their horses.
  • “What ails thee, Erling?” said Glumm abruptly. “One would fancy that the fai_ilda was behind thee, so often hast thou looked back since the berserk lef_s.”
  • “It is because the fair Hilda is before me that I look so often over m_houlder, for I suspect that there are those behind us who will one day caus_er grief,” replied Erling sadly; then, assuming a gay air, he added—“Come, friend Glumm, I wish to know thy mind in regard to a matter of som_mportance. How wouldst thou like to engage, single handed, with ten men?”
  • Glumm smiled grimly, as he was wont to do when amused by anything—which, t_ay truth, was not often.
  • “Truly,” said he, “my answer to that must depend on thine answer to this—Am _upposed to have my back against a cliff, or to be surrounded by the ten?”
  • “With thy back guarded, of course.”
  • “In that case I should not refuse the fight, but I would prefer to be mor_qually matched,” said Glumm, “Two to one, now, is a common chance of war, a_hou knowest full well. I myself have had four against me at one time—and whe_ne is in good spirits this is not a serious difficulty, unless there chanc_o be a berserk amongst them; even in that case, by the use of a littl_ctivity of limb, one can separate them, and so kill them in detail. But te_re almost too many for one man, however bold, big, or skilful he may be.”
  • “Then what—wouldst thou say to twenty against two?” asked Erling, giving _eculiar glance at his friend.
  • “That were better than ten to one, because two stout fellows back to back ar_ot easily overcome, if the fight be fair with sword and axe, and arrows o_pears be not allowed. Thou and I, Erling, might make a good stand togethe_gainst twenty, for we can use our weapons, and are not small men.
  • Nevertheless, I think that it would be our last fight, though I make no doub_e should thin their number somewhat. But why ask such questions?”
  • “Because I have taken a fancy to know to what extent I might count on thee i_ase of surprise.”
  • “To what extent!” said Glumm, flushing, and looking his friend full in th_ace. “Hast known me so long to such small purpose, that ye should doubt m_illingness to stand by thee to the death, if need be, against any odds?”
  • “Nay, be not so hasty, Glumm. I doubt not thy courage nor thy regard for me, but I had a fancy to know what amount of odds thou wouldst deem serious, for _ay tell thee that our powers are likely to be put to the proof to-day. M_insman, Jarl Rongvold, told me at parting that twenty men—and among them Hak_he berserk—are to be sent after us, and are doubtless even now upon ou_rack.”
  • “Then why this easy pace?” said Glumm, in a tone of great surprise. “Surel_here is no reason why we should abide the issue of such a combat when nothin_s to be gained by it and much to be lost; for if we are killed, who wil_repare the men of Horlingdal for the King’s approach, and tell of hi_ntentions?”
  • “That is wisely spoken, Glumm; nevertheless I feel disposed to meet Kin_arald’s men.”
  • “This spirit accords ill with the assertion that thou art not fond of war,” returned Glumm, with a smile.
  • “I am not so sure of that,” rejoined Erling, with a look of perplexity. “It i_ore the consequences of war—its evil effects on communities, on women an_hildren—that I dislike, than the mere matter of fighting, which, although _annot say I long for it, as some of our friends do, I can truly assert I tak_ome pleasure in, when engaged in it. Besides, in this case I do not wish t_eet these fellows for a mere piece of brag, but I think it might teach Kin_arald that he has to do with men who have heart and skill to use thei_eapons, and show him what he may expect if he tries to subdue this district.
  • However, be that as it may, the question is, shall we hang back and accep_his challenge—for such I regard it—or shall we push on?”
  • “Yonder is an answer to that question, which settles it for us,” said Glum_uietly, pointing to a ridge on the right of the bridle path, which rose hig_bove the tree tops. A troop of horsemen were seen to cross it and gallop dow_he slope, where they quickly disappeared in the forest.
  • “How many didst thou count?” asked Erling, with a look of surprise.
  • “Only ten,” answered Glumm.
  • “Come,” cried Erling cheerfully, as he drew his sword, “the odds are not s_reat as we had expected. I suppose that King Harald must have thought u_oor-looking warriors, or perchance he has sent ten berserkers against us.
  • Anyhow I am content. Only one thing do I regret, and that is, that, among th_ther foolish acts I have been guilty of at this time, I left my good battle- axe behind me. This is a level piece of sward. Shall we await them here?”
  • “Aye,” was Glumm’s laconic answer, as he felt the edge of his long two-hande_word, settled himself more firmly on his seat, and carefully looked to th_astenings of his armour.
  • Erling did the same, and both drew up their steeds with their backs towards a_mpenetrable thicket. In front lay a level stretch of ground, encumbered onl_ere and there with one or two small bushes, beyond which they had a view fa_nto the dark forest, where the armour of the approaching horsemen could b_een glancing among the tree stems.
  • “It is likely,” muttered Erling, “that they will try to speak us fair a_irst. Most assassins do, to throw men off their guard. I counsel that ou_ords be few and our action quick.”
  • Glumm gave vent to a deep, short laugh, which sounded, however, marvellousl_ike a growl, and again said—
  • “Aye.”
  • Next moment the ten horsemen galloped towards them, and reined up at th_istance of a few yards, while two of them advanced. One of these, who was n_ther than Krake the berserk, said in a loud, commanding voice—
  • “Yield thee, Erling, in the name of the King!”
  • “That for the King!” cried Erling, splitting the head of Krake’s horse wit_he edge of his sword, and receiving Krake himself on the point of it as h_ell forward, so that it went in at his breast and came out at his back. A_he same time Glumm’s horse sprang forward, his long sword whistled sharply a_t flashed through the air, and, next moment, the head of the second man wa_olling on the ground.
  • So sudden was the onset that the others had barely time to guard themselve_hen Glumm’s heavy sword cleft the top of the shield and the helmet of one, tumbling him out of the saddle, while the point of Erling’s lighter weapo_ierced the throat of another. The remaining six turned aside, right and left, so as to divide their opponents, and then attacked them with great fury—fo_hey were all brave and picked men. At first Erling and Glumm had enough to d_o defend themselves, without attempting to attack, but at a critical momen_he horse of one of Glumm’s opponents stumbled, and his rider being expose_as instantly cut down. Glumm now uttered a shout, for he felt sure o_ictory, having only two to deal with. Erling’s sword proved to be too shor_or such a combat, for his enemies were armed with long and heavy weapons, an_ne of them had a spear. He eluded their assaults, however, with amazin_ctivity, and wounded one of them so badly that he was obliged to retire fro_he fray. Seeing this our hero made a sudden rush at one of the men who fough_ith a battle-axe, seized the axe by the handle, and with one sweep of hi_word lopped off the man’s arm.
  • Then did Erling also feel that victory was secure, for he now wielded an ax_hat was almost as good and heavy as his own, and only one man stood befor_im. Under the impulse of this feeling he uttered a shout which rang throug_he forest like the roar of a lion.
  • Now, well would it have been for both Erling and Glumm if they had restraine_hemselves on that occasion, for the shouts they uttered served to guide tw_ands of enemies who were in search of them.
  • It will be remembered that Hake the berserk had gone after our heroes by th_orest road, but, not finding them so soon as he had anticipated, and feelin_ sort of irresistible belief that they had after all gone by the fells, h_ltered his own plans in so far that he turned towards the road leading by th_ountains, before he reached the pine with the double stem. Thus he jus_issed those whom he sought, and, after some time, came to the conclusion tha_e was a fool, and had made a great mistake in not holding to his origina_lan. By way of improving matters he divided his little band into two, an_ending five of his men in one direction, rode off with the remaining four i_nother. Krake, on the contrary, had fulfilled his orders to the letter; ha_one to the split rock, and then hastened to the double-stemmed pine, not fa_rom which, as we have seen, he found the men of whom he was in search, an_lso met his death.
  • One of the bands of five men chanced to be within earshot when Erling shouted, and they immediately bore down in the direction, and cheered as they came i_ight of the combatants. The three men who yet stood up to our friends wheele_bout at once and galloped to meet them, only too glad to be reinforced a_uch a critical moment.
  • There was a little stream which trickled over the edge of a rock close to th_pot where the combat had taken place. Erling and Glumm leaped off thei_orses as if by one impulse, and, running to this, drank deeply and hastily.
  • As they ran back and vaulted into their saddles, they heard a faint cheer i_he far distance.
  • “Ha!” exclaimed Erling, “Harald doubtless  _did_  send twenty men after all, for here come the rest of them. It is good fortune that a berserk is seldom _ood leader—he should not have divided his force. These eight must go down, friend Glumm, before the others come up, else are our days numbered.”
  • The expression of Glumm’s blood-stained visage spoke volumes, but his tongu_ttered never a word. Indeed, there was no time for further speech, for th_ight men, who had conversed hurriedly together for a few seconds, were no_pproaching. The two friends did not await the attack, but, setting spurs t_heir horses, dashed straight at them. Two were overturned in the shock, an_heir horses rolled on them, so that they never rose again. On the righ_rling hewed down one man, and on the left his friend cut down another. The_eined up, turned round, and charged again, but the four who were left wer_oo wise to withstand the shock; they swerved aside. In doing so the foot o_ne of their horses caught in a bramble. He stumbled, and the rider was throw_iolently against a tree and stunned, so that he could not remount. This wa_ortunate, for Erling and Glumm were becoming exhausted, and the three men wh_till opposed them were comparatively fresh. One of these suddenly charge_lumm, and killed his horse. Glumm leaped up, and, drawing his knife, stabbe_he horse of the other to the heart. As it fell he caught his rider by th_ight wrist, and with a sudden wrench dislocated his arm. Erling meanwhil_isabled one of the others, and gave the third such a severe wound that h_hought it best to seek safety in flight.
  • Erling now turned to Glumm, and asked if he thought it would be best to rid_way from the men who were still to come up, or to remain and fight them also.
  • “If there be five more,” said Glumm, leaning against a tree, and removing hi_elmet in order to wipe his brow, “then is our last battle fought, for, although I have that in me which could manage to slay one, I have not strengt_or two, much less three. Besides, my good steed is dead, and we have no tim_o catch one of the others.”
  • “Now will I become a berserk,” cried Erling, casting his gilt helmet on th_round and undoing the fastenings of his coat of mail. “Armour is good when _an is strong, but when he is worn out it is only an encumbrance. I counse_hee to follow my example.”
  • “It is not a bad one,” said Glumm, also throwing down his helmet and strippin_ff his armour. “Ha! there are more of them than we counted on—six.”
  • As he spoke six horsemen were seen approaching through the distant glades o_he forest.
  • The two friends ran to the fountain before mentioned, slaked their thirst, an_astily bathed their heads and faces; then, seizing their swords and shields, and leaving the rest of their armour on the sward, they ran to a rugged par_f the ground, where horses could not act. Mounting to the highest point of _ocky mound, they awaited the approach of their foes.
  • Quickly they came forward, their faces blazing with wrath as they rode ove_he field of battle, and saw their slaughtered comrades. Hake the berserk rod_n front, and, advancing as near as possible to the place where his enemie_tood, said tauntingly:
  • “What, are ye so fearful of only six men, after having slain so many?”
  • “Small meat would we make of thee and thy men, so that the crows might pick i_asily, if we were only half as fresh as ye are,” said Erling; “but we chos_o rest here awhile, so if ye would fight ye must come hither to us on foot.”
  • “Nay, but methinks it would be well for both parties,” returned the berserk, “that they should fight on level ground.”
  • Erling and Glumm had thrown themselves on the rocks to get as much rest a_ossible before the inevitable combat that was still before them. The_onsulted for a few seconds, and then the former replied:
  • “We will gladly come down, if ye will meet us on foot.”
  • “Agreed,” cried the berserk, leaping off his horse, and leading it to _eighbouring tree, to which he fastened it. The others followed his example.
  • Then our two heroes arose and stretched themselves.
  • “It has been a good fight,” said Erling. “Men will talk of it in days to come, after we are far away in the world of spirits.”
  • There was deep pathos in the tone of the young warrior as he spoke thes_ords, and cast his eyes upwards to the blue vault as if he sought t_enetrate that spirit world, on the threshold of which he believed himself t_tand.
  • “If we had but one hour’s rest, or one other man on our side; but—” He stoppe_uddenly, for the six men now stood in the middle of the little plain wher_rling and Glumm had fought so long and so valiantly that day, and awaite_heir coming.
  • Hastily descending the mound, the two friends strode boldly towards thei_pponents, scorning to let them see by look or gesture that they were eithe_atigued or depressed. As they drew near, Erling singled out Hake, and Glum_ent towards a tall, powerful man, who stood ready with a huge sword restin_n his shoulder, as if eager to begin the combat. Glumm had arranged in hi_wn mind that that man and he should die together. Beside him stood a warrio_ith a battle-axe, and a steel helmet on his head. Before Glumm could reac_is intended victim the tall man’s sword flashed in the air like a gleam o_ight, and the head with the steel helmet went spinning on the ground!
  • “That’s the way that Kettle Flatnose pays off old scores,” cried the Iris_hrall, turning suddenly upon his late friends, and assailing one of them wit_uch fury that he cut him down in a few seconds, and then ran to draw off on_f the two who had attacked Erling. Glumm’s amazement at this was, as may wel_e believed, excessive; but it was nothing to the intensity of his joy when h_ound suddenly that the fight was now equalised, and that there stood only on_an to oppose him. His heart leaped up. New life gave spring to his muscles; and to these new feelings he gave vent in one loud shout, as he sprang upo_is adversary and cleft him to the chin with one sweep of his sword!
  • Meanwhile Kettle Flatnose had killed his man; and he was about to come u_ehind Hake and sweep off his head, when he was seized by Glumm and dragge_iolently back.
  • “Would ye rob Erling of the honour of slaying this noted berserk?” he sai_ternly.
  • “Truly,” replied Kettle, somewhat abashed, “I did not know that he was noted; and as for the honour of it, I do think that Erling seems to have got honou_nough to-day (if all this be his work) to content him for some time to come; but as ye will,” he added, putting the point of his sword on the ground, an_esting his arms on the hilt.
  • Glumm also leaned on his sword; and standing thus, these two watched th_ight.
  • Now, it may perhaps seem to some readers that as the other men had bee_isposed of so summarily, it was strange that Erling the Bold should be s_ong in dispatching this one; but for our hero’s credit, we must point ou_everal facts which may have perhaps been overlooked. In the first place, Kettle Flatnose was a thoroughly fresh man when he began the fight, an_lthough he killed two men, it must be remembered that one of these was slai_hile off his guard. Then, Glumm did indeed slay his man promptly, but he wa_ne of King Harald’s ordinary men-at-arms; whereas Erling was opposed by on_f the most celebrated of the King’s warriors—Hake, the berserk of Hadeland—_an whose name and prowess were known far and wide, not only in Norway, but i_enmark, and all along the southern shores of the Baltic. It would have bee_trange indeed had such a man fallen easily before any human arm, much mor_trange had he succumbed at once to one that had been already much exhauste_ith fighting.
  • True to the brotherhood to which he belonged, the berserk attacked Erling wit_ncredible fury. He roared more like a mad bull than a man as he made th_nset; his eyes glared, his mouth foamed, and he bit his shield as he wa_riven back. Being fresh, he danced round Erling perpetually, springing in t_ut and thrust, and leaping back to avoid the terrific blows which the latte_etched at him with his weighty axe. Once he made a cut at Erling’s head, which the latter did not attempt to parry, intending to trust to his helmet t_efend him, and forgetting for the moment that he had cast that useful piec_f armour on the plain. Luckily the blow was not truly aimed. It shore a loc_rom Erling’s head as he swung his axe against his opponent’s shield, an_attered him down on his knees; but the berserk leaped up with a yell, an_gain rushed at him. Hake happened just then to cast his eyes on the two me_ho were quietly looking on, and he so managed the fight for a few moment_fterwards that he got near to them. Then turning towards them with a howl o_emoniacal fury, he made a desperate cut at the unsuspecting Glumm, who wa_aken so thoroughly by surprise that he made no movement whatever to defen_imself. Fortunately. Kettle Flatnose was on the alert, but he had only tim_o thrust his sword awkwardly between Glumm’s head and the descending weapon.
  • The act prevented a fatal gash, but it could not altogether arrest the forc_f the blow, which fell on the flat of his sword, and beat it down on Glumm’_kull so violently that he was instantly stretched upon the green sward.
  • Erling’s axe fell on the helm of the berserk almost at the same time. Even i_hat moment of victory a feeling of respect for the courage and boldness o_his man touched the heart of Erling, who, with the swiftness of thought, pu_n force his favourite practice—he turned the edge of the axe, and the broa_ide of it fell on the steel headpiece with tremendous force, causing th_erserk of Hadeland to stretch himself on the green sward beside Glumm th_ruff; thus ending the famous battle of the “Berserkers and the Bold”, i_egard to which Thikskul the scald writes:—
  • > “The Bold one and his doughty friend, > Glumm the Gruff of Horlingsend, > Faced, fought, and felled, and bravely slew, > Full twenty men—a berserk crew > Sent by King Harald them to slay— > But much he rued it—lack-a-day!
  • >     The heroes cut and hacked them sore, >     Hit, split, and slashed them back and fore— >     And left them lying in their gore.”