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Chapter 23 Dr. Seward's Diary

  • 3 October.—The time seemed teribly long whilst we were waiting for the comin_f Godalming and Quincey Morris. The Professor tried to keep our minds activ_y using them all the time. I could see his beneficent purpose, by the sid_lances which he threw from time to time at Harker. The poor fellow i_verwhelmed in a misery that is appalling to see. Last night he was a frank, happy-looking man, with strong, youthful face, full of energy, and with dar_rown hair. Today he is a drawn, haggard old man, whose white hair matche_ell with the hollow burning eyes and griefwritten lines of his face. Hi_nergy is still intact. In fact, he is like a living flame. This may yet b_is salvation, for if all go well, it will tide him over the despairin_eriod. He will then, in a kind of way, wake again to the realities of life.
  • Poor fellow, I thought my own trouble was bad enough, but his … !
  • The Professor knows this well enough, and is doing his best to keep his min_ctive. What he has been saying was, under the circumstances, of absorbin_nterest. So well as I can remember, here it is:
  • "I have studied, over and over again since they came into my hands, all th_apers relating to this monster, and the more I have studied, the greate_eems the necessity to utterly stamp him out. All through there are signs o_is advance. Not only of his power, but of his knowledge of it. As I learne_rom the researches of my friend Arminius of Buda-Pesth, he was in life a mos_onderful man. Soldier, statesman, and alchemist. Which latter was the highes_evelopment of the science knowledge of his time. He had a mighty brain, _earning beyond compare, and a heart that knew no fear and no remorse. H_ared even to attend the Scholomance, and there was no branch of knowledge o_is time that he did not essay.
  • "Well, in him the brain powers survived the physical death. Though it woul_eem that memory was not all complete. In some faculties of mind he has been, and is, only a child. But he is growing, and some things that were childish a_he first are now of man's stature. He is experimenting, and doing it well.
  • And if it had not been that we have crossed his path he would be yet, he ma_e yet if we fail, the father or furtherer of a new order of beings, whos_oad must lead through Death, not Life."
  • Harker groaned and said, "And this is all arrayed against my darling! But ho_s he experimenting? The knowledge may help us to defeat him!"
  • "He has all along, since his coming, been trying his power, slowly but surely.
  • That big child-brain of his is working. Well for us, it is as yet, a child- brain. For had he dared, at the first, to attempt certain things he would lon_go have been beyond our power. However, he means to succeed, and a man wh_as centuries before him can afford to wait and to go slow. Festina lente ma_ell be his motto."
  • "I fail to understand," said Harker wearily. "Oh, do be more plain to me!
  • Perhaps grief and trouble are dulling my brain."
  • The Professor laid his hand tenderly on his shoulder as he spoke, "Ah, m_hild, I will be plain. Do you not see how, of late, this monster has bee_reeping into knowledge experimentally. How he has been making use of th_oophagous patient to effect his entry into friend John's home. For you_ampire, though in all afterwards he can come when and how he will, must a_he first make entry only when asked thereto by an inmate. But these are no_is most important experiments. Do we not see how at the first all these s_reat boxes were moved by others. He knew not then but that must be so. Bu_ll the time that so great child-brain of his was growing, and he began t_onsider whether he might not himself move the box. So he began to help. An_hen, when he found that this be all right, he try to move them all alone. An_o he progress, and he scatter these graves of him. And none but he know wher_hey are hidden.
  • "He may have intend to bury them deep in the ground. So that only he use the_n the night, or at such time as he can change his form, they do him equa_ell, and none may know these are his hiding place! But, my child, do no_espair, this knowledge came to him just too late! Already all of his lair_ut one be sterilize as for him. And before the sunset this shall be so. The_e have no place where he can move and hide. I delayed this morning that so w_ight be sure. Is there not more at stake for us than for him? Then why not b_ore careful than him? By my clock it is one hour and already, if all be well, friend Arthur and Quincey are on their way to us. Today is our day, and w_ust go sure, if slow, and lose no chance. See! There are five of us whe_hose absent ones return."
  • Whilst we were speaking we were startled by a knock at the hall door, th_ouble postman's knock of the telegraph boy. We all moved out to the hall wit_ne impulse, and Van Helsing, holding up his hand to us to keep silence, stepped to the door and opened it. The boy handed in a dispatch. The Professo_losed the door again, and after looking at the direction, opened it and rea_loud.
  • "Look out for D. He has just now, 12:45, come from Carfax hurriedly an_astened towards the South. He seems to be going the round and may want to se_ou: Mina."
  • There was a pause, broken by Jonathan Harker's voice, "Now, God be thanked, w_hall soon meet!"
  • Van Helsing turned to him quickly and said, "God will act in His own way an_ime. Do not fear, and do not rejoice as yet. For what we wish for at th_oment may be our own undoings."
  • "I care for nothing now," he answered hotly, "except to wipe out this brut_rom the face of creation. I would sell my soul to do it!"
  • "Oh, hush, hush, my child!" said Van Helsing. "God does not purchase souls i_his wise, and the Devil, though he may purchase, does not keep faith. But Go_s merciful and just, and knows your pain and your devotion to that dear Mada_ina. Think you, how her pain would be doubled, did she but hear your wil_ords. Do not fear any of us, we are all devoted to this cause, and toda_hall see the end. The time is coming for action. Today this Vampire is limi_o the powers of man, and till sunset he may not change. It will take him tim_o arrive here, see it is twenty minutes past one, and there are yet som_imes before he can hither come, be he never so quick. What we must hope fo_s that my Lord Arthur and Quincey arrive first."
  • About half an hour after we had received Mrs. Harker's telegram, there came _uiet, resolute knock at the hall door. It was just an ordinary knock, such a_s given hourly by thousands of gentlemen, but it made the Professor's hear_nd mine beat loudly. We looked at each other, and together moved out into th_all. We each held ready to use our various armaments, the spiritual in th_eft hand, the mortal in the right. Van Helsing pulled back the latch, an_olding the door half open, stood back, having both hands ready for action.
  • The gladness of our hearts must have shown upon our faces when on the step, close to the door, we saw Lord Godalming and Quincey Morris. They came quickl_n and closed the door behind them, the former saying, as they moved along th_all.
  • "It is all right. We found both places. Six boxes in each and we destroye_hem all."
  • "Destroyed?" asked the Professor.
  • "For him!" We were silent for a minute, and then Quincey said, "There'_othing to do but to wait here. If, however, he doesn't turn up by fiv_'clock, we must start off. For it won't do to leave Mrs. Harker alone afte_unset."
  • "He will be here before long now,' said Van Helsing, who had been consultin_is pocketbook. "Nota bene, in Madam's telegram he went south from Carfax.
  • That means he went to cross the river, and he could only do so at slack o_ide, which should be something before one o'clock. That he went south has _eaning for us. He is as yet only suspicious, and he went from Carfax first t_he place where he would suspect interference least. You must have been a_ermondsey only a short time before him. That he is not here already show_hat he went to Mile End next. This took him some time, for he would then hav_o be carried over the river in some way. Believe me, my friends, we shall no_ave long to wait now. We should have ready some plan of attack, so that w_ay throw away no chance. Hush, there is no time now. Have all your arms! B_eady!" He held up a warning hand as he spoke, for we all could hear a ke_oftly inserted in the lock of the hall door.
  • I could not but admire, even at such a moment, the way in which a dominan_pirit asserted itself. In all our hunting parties and adventures in differen_arts of the world, Quincey Morris had always been the one to arrange the pla_f action, and Arthur and I had been accustomed to obey him implicitly. Now, the old habit seemed to be renewed instinctively. With a swift glance aroun_he room, he at once laid out our plan of attack, and without speaking a word, with a gesture, placed us each in position. Van Helsing, Harker, and I wer_ust behind the door, so that when it was opened the Professor could guard i_hilst we two stepped between the incomer and the door. Godalming behind an_uincey in front stood just out of sight ready to move in front of the window.
  • We waited in a suspense that made the seconds pass with nightmare slowness.
  • The slow, careful steps came along the hall. The Count was evidently prepare_or some surprise, at least he feared it.
  • Suddenly with a single bound he leaped into the room. Winning a way past u_efore any of us could raise a hand to stay him. There was something s_antherlike in the movement, something so unhuman, that it seemed to sober u_ll from the shock of his coming. The first to act was Harker, who with _uick movement, threw himself before the door leading into the room in th_ront of the house. As the Count saw us, a horrible sort of snarl passed ove_is face, showing the eyeteeth long and pointed. But the evil smile as quickl_assed into a cold stare of lion-like disdain. His expression again change_s, with a single impulse, we all advanced upon him. It was a pity that we ha_ot some better organized plan of attack, for even at the moment I wondere_hat we were to do. I did not myself know whether our lethal weapons woul_vail us anything.
  • Harker evidently meant to try the matter, for he had ready his great Kukr_nife and made a fierce and sudden cut at him. The blow was a powerful one.
  • Only the diabolical quickness of the Count's leap back saved him. A secon_ess and the trenchant blade had shorn through his coat, making a wide ga_hence a bundle of bank notes and a stream of gold fell out. The expression o_he Count's face was so hellish, that for a moment I feared for Harker, thoug_ saw him throw the terrible knife aloft again for another stroke.
  • Instinctively I moved forward with a protective impulse, holding the Crucifi_nd Wafer in my left hand. I felt a mighty power fly along my arm, and it wa_ithout surprise that I saw the monster cower back before a similar movemen_ade spontaneously by each one of us. It would be impossible to describe th_xpression of hate and baffled malignity, of anger and hellish rage, whic_ame over the Count's face. His waxen hue became greenish-yellow by th_ontrast of his burning eyes, and the red scar on the forehead showed on th_allid skin like a palpitating wound. The next instant, with a sinuous dive h_wept under Harker's arm, ere his blow could fall, and grasping a handful o_he money from the floor, dashed across the room, threw himself at the window.
  • Amid the crash and glitter of the falling glass, he tumbled into the flagge_rea below. Through the sound of the shivering glass I could hear the "ting"
  • of the gold, as some of the sovereigns fell on the flagging.
  • We ran over and saw him spring unhurt from the ground. He, rushing up th_teps, crossed the flagged yard, and pushed open the stable door. There h_urned and spoke to us.
  • "You think to baffle me, you with your pale faces all in a row, like sheep i_ butcher's. You shall be sorry yet, each one of you! You think you have lef_e without a place to rest, but I have more. My revenge is just begun! _pread it over centuries, and time is on my side. Your girls that you all lov_re mine already. And through them you and others shall yet be mine, m_reatures, to do my bidding and to be my jackals when I want to feed. Bah!"
  • With a contemptuous sneer, he passed quickly through the door, and we hear_he rusty bolt creak as he fastened it behind him. A door beyond opened an_hut. The first of us to speak was the Professor. Realizing the difficulty o_ollowing him through the stable, we moved toward the hall.
  • "We have learnt something … much! Notwithstanding his brave words, he fear_s. He fears time, he fears want! For if not, why he hurry so? His very ton_etray him, or my ears deceive. Why take that money? You follow quick. You ar_unters of the wild beast, and understand it so. For me, I make sure tha_othing here may be of use to him, if so that he returns."
  • As he spoke he put the money remaining in his pocket, took the title deeds i_he bundle as Harker had left them, and swept the remaining things into th_pen fireplace, where he set fire to them with a match.
  • Godalming and Morris had rushed out into the yard, and Harker had lowere_imself from the window to follow the Count. He had, however, bolted th_table door, and by the time they had forced it open there was no sign of him.
  • Van Helsing and I tried to make inquiry at the back of the house. But the mew_as deserted and no one had seen him depart.
  • It was now late in the afternoon, and sunset was not far off. We had t_ecognize that our game was up. With heavy hearts we agreed with the Professo_hen he said, "Let us go back to Madam Mina. Poor, poor dear Madam Mina. Al_e can do just now is done, and we can there, at least, protect her. But w_eed not despair. There is but one more earth box, and we must try to find it.
  • When that is done all may yet be well."
  • I could see that he spoke as bravely as he could to comfort Harker. The poo_ellow was quite broken down, now and again he gave a low groan which he coul_ot suppress. He was thinking of his wife.
  • With sad hearts we came back to my house, where we found Mrs. Harker waitin_s, with an appearance of cheerfulness which did honor to her bravery an_nselfishness. When she saw our faces, her own became as pale as death. For _econd or two her eyes were closed as if she were in secret prayer.
  • And then she said cheerfully, "I can never thank you all enough. Oh, my poo_arling!"
  • As she spoke, she took her husband's grey head in her hands and kissed it.
  • "Lay your poor head here and rest it. All will yet be well, dear! God wil_rotect us if He so will it in His good intent." The poor fellow groaned.
  • There was no place for words in his sublime misery.
  • We had a sort of perfunctory supper together, and I think it cheered us all u_omewhat. It was, perhaps, the mere animal heat of food to hungry people, fo_one of us had eaten anything since breakfast, or the sense of companionshi_ay have helped us, but anyhow we were all less miserable, and saw the morro_s not altogether without hope.
  • True to our promise, we told Mrs. Harker everything which had passed. An_lthough she grew snowy white at times when danger had seemed to threaten he_usband, and red at others when his devotion to her was manifested sh_istened bravely and with calmness. When we came to the part where Harker ha_ushed at the Count so recklessly, she clung to her husband's arm, and held i_ight as though her clinging could protect him from any harm that might come.
  • She said nothing, however, till the narration was all done,and matters ha_een brought up to the present time.
  • Then without letting go her husband's hand she stood up amongst us and spoke.
  • Oh, that I could give any idea of the scene. Of that sweet, sweet, good, goo_oman in all the radiant beauty of her youth and animation, with the red sca_n her forehead, of which she was conscious, and which we saw with grinding o_ur teeth, remembering whence and how it came. Her loving kindness against ou_rim hate. Her tender faith against all our fears and doubting. And we, knowing that so far as symbols went, she with all her goodness and purity an_aith, was outcast from God.
  • "Jonathan," she said, and the word sounded like music on her lips it was s_ull of love and tenderness, "Jonathan dear, and you all my true, tru_riends, I want you to bear something in mind through all this dreadful time.
  • I know that you must fight. That you must destroy even as you destroyed th_alse Lucy so that the true Lucy might live hereafter. But it is not a work o_ate. That poor soul who has wrought all this misery is the saddest case o_ll. Just think what will be his joy when he, too, is destroyed in his worse_art that his better part may have spiritual immortality. You must be pitifu_o him, too,though it may not hold your hands from his destruction."
  • As she spoke I could see her husband's face darken and draw together, a_hough the passion in him were shriveling his being to its core. Instinctivel_he clasp on his wife's hand grew closer, till his knuckles looked white. Sh_id not flinch from the pain which I knew she must have suffered, but looke_t him with eyes that were more appealing than ever.
  • As she stopped speaking he leaped to his feet, almost tearing his hand fro_ers as he spoke.
  • "May God give him into my hand just for long enough to destroy that earthl_ife of him which we are aiming at. If beyond it I could send his soul foreve_nd ever to burning hell I would do it!"
  • "Oh, hush! Oh, hush in the name of the good God. Don't say such things, Jonathan, my husband, or you will crush me with fear and horror. Just think, my dear … I have been thinking all this long, long day of it … that … perhaps … some day … I, too, may need such pity, and that some other like you, an_ith equal cause for anger, may deny it to me! Oh, my husband! My husband, indeed I would have spared you such a thought had there been another way. Bu_ pray that God may not have treasured your wild words, except as the heart- broken wail of a very loving and sorely stricken man. Oh, God, let these poo_hite hairs go in evidence of what he has suffered, who all his life has don_o wrong, and on whom so many sorrows have come."
  • We men were all in tears now. There was no resisting them, and we wept openly.
  • She wept, too, to see that her sweeter counsels had prevailed. Her husban_lung himself on his knees beside her, and putting his arms round her, hid hi_ace in the folds of her dress. Van Helsing beckoned to us and we stole out o_he room, leaving the two loving hearts alone with their God.
  • Before they retired the Professor fixed up the room against any coming of th_ampire, and assured Mrs. Harker that she might rest in peace. She tried t_chool herself to the belief, and manifestly for her husband's sake, tried t_eem content. It was a brave struggle, and was, I think and believe, no_ithout its reward. Van Helsing had placed at hand a bell which either of the_as to sound in case of any emergency. When they had retired, Quincey, Godalming, and I arranged that we should sit up, dividing the night betwee_s, and watch over the safety of the poor stricken lady. The first watch fall_o Quincey, so the rest of us shall be off to bed as soon as we can.
  • Godalming has already turned in, for his is the second watch. Now that my wor_s done I, too, shall go to bed.
  • JONATHAN HARKER'S JOURNAL
  • 3-4 October, close to midnight.—I thought yesterday would never end. There wa_ver me a yearning for sleep, in some sort of blind belief that to wake woul_e to find things changed, and that any change must now be for the better.
  • Before we parted, we discussed what our next step was to be, but we coul_rrive at no result. All we knew was that one earth box remained, and that th_ount alone knew where it was. If he chooses to lie hidden, he may baffle u_or years. And in the meantime, the thought is too horrible, I dare not thin_f it even now. This I know, that if ever there was a woman who was al_erfection, that one is my poor wronged darling. I loved her a thousand time_ore for her sweet pity of last night, a pity that made my own hate of th_onster seem despicable. Surely God will not permit the world to be the poore_y the loss of such a creature. This is hope to me. We are all driftin_eefwards now, and faith is our only anchor. Thank God! Mina is sleeping, an_leeping without dreams. I fear what her dreams might be like, with suc_errible memories to ground them in. She has not been so calm, within m_eeing, since the sunset. Then, for a while, there came over her face a repos_hich was like spring after the blasts of March. I thought at the time that i_as the softness of the red sunset on her face, but somehow now I think it ha_ deeper meaning. I am not sleepy myself, though I am weary … weary to death.
  • However, I must try to sleep. For there is tomorrow to think of, and there i_o rest for me until …
  • Later—I must have fallen asleep, for I was awakened by Mina, who was sittin_p in bed, with a startled look on her face. I could see easily, for we di_ot leave the room in darkness. She had placed a warning hand over my mouth, and now she whispered in my ear, "Hush! There is someone in the corridor!" _ot up softly, and crossing the room, gently opened the door.
  • Just outside, stretched on a mattress, lay Mr. Morris, wide awake. He raised _arning hand for silence as he whispered to me, "Hush! Go back to bed. It i_ll right. One of us will be here all night. We don't mean to take an_hances!"
  • His look and gesture forbade discussion, so I came back and told Mina. Sh_ighed and positively a shadow of a smile stole over her poor, pale face a_he put her arms round me and said softly, "Oh, thank God for good brave men!"
  • With a sigh she sank back again to sleep. I write this now as I am not sleepy, though I must try again.
  • 4 October, morning.—Once again during the night I was wakened by Mina. Thi_ime we had all had a good sleep, for the grey of the coming dawn was makin_he windows into sharp oblongs, and the gas flame was like a speck rather tha_ disc of light.
  • She said to me hurriedly, "Go, call the Professor. I want to see him at once."
  • "Why?" I asked.
  • "I have an idea. I suppose it must have come in the night, and matured withou_y knowing it. He must hypnotize me before the dawn, and then I shall be abl_o speak. Go quick, dearest, the time is getting close."
  • I went to the door. Dr. Seward was resting on the mattress, and seeing me, h_prang to his feet.
  • "Is anything wrong?" he asked, in alarm.
  • "No," I replied. "But Mina wants to see Dr. Van Helsing at once."
  • "I will go," he said, and hurried into the Professor's room.
  • Two or three minutes later Van Helsing was in the room in his dressing gown, and Mr. Morris and Lord Godalming were with Dr. Seward at the door askin_uestions. When the Professor saw Mina a smile, a positive smile ousted th_nxiety of his face.
  • He rubbed his hands as he said, "Oh, my dear Madam Mina, this is indeed _hange. See! Friend Jonathan, we have got our dear Madam Mina, as of old, bac_o us today!" Then turning to her, he said cheerfully, "And what am I to d_or you? For at this hour you do not want me for nothing."
  • "I want you to hypnotize me!" she said. "Do it before the dawn, for I fee_hat then I can speak, and speak freely. Be quick, for the time is short!"
  • Without a word he motioned her to sit up in bed.
  • Looking fixedly at her, he commenced to make passes in front of her, from ove_he top of her head downward, with each hand in turn. Mina gazed at hi_ixedly for a few minutes, during which my own heart beat like a trip hammer, for I felt that some crisis was at hand. Gradually her eyes closed, and sh_at, stock still. Only by the gentle heaving of her bosom could one know tha_he was alive. The Professor made a few more passes and then stopped, and _ould see that his forehead was covered with great beads of perspiration. Min_pened her eyes, but she did not seem the same woman. There was a far-awa_ook in her eyes, and her voice had a sad dreaminess which was new to me.
  • Raising his hand to impose silence, the Professor motioned to me to bring th_thers in. They came on tiptoe, closing the door behind them, and stood at th_oot of the bed, looking on. Mina appeared not to see them. The stillness wa_roken by Van Helsing's voice speaking in a low level tone which would no_reak the current of her thoughts.
  • "Where are you?" The answer came in a neutral way.
  • "I do not know. Sleep has no place it can call its own." For several minute_here was silence. Mina sat rigid, and the Professor stood staring at he_ixedly.
  • The rest of us hardly dared to breathe. The room was growing lighter. Withou_aking his eyes from Mina's face, Dr. Van Helsing motioned me to pull up th_lind. I did so, and the day seemed just upon us. A red streak shot up, and _osy light seemed to diffuse itself through the room. On the instant th_rofessor spoke again.
  • "Where are you now?"
  • The answer came dreamily, but with intention. It were as though she wer_nterpreting something. I have heard her use the same tone when reading he_horthand notes.
  • "I do not know. It is all strange to me!"
  • "What do you see?"
  • "I can see nothing. It is all dark."
  • "What do you hear?" I could detect the strain in the Professor's patien_oice.
  • "The lapping of water. It is gurgling by, and little waves leap. I can hea_hem on the outside."
  • "Then you are on a ship?'"
  • We all looked at each other, trying to glean something each from the other. W_ere afraid to think.
  • The answer came quick, "Oh, yes!"
  • "What else do you hear?"
  • "The sound of men stamping overhead as they run about. There is the creakin_f a chain, and the loud tinkle as the check of the capstan falls into th_atchet."
  • "What are you doing?"
  • "I am still, oh so still. It is like death!" The voice faded away into a dee_reath as of one sleeping, and the open eyes closed again.
  • By this time the sun had risen, and we were all in the full light of day. Dr.
  • Van Helsing placed his hands on Mina's shoulders, and laid her head dow_oftly on her pillow. She lay like a sleeping child for a few moments, an_hen, with a long sigh, awoke and stared in wonder to see us all around her.
  • "Have I been talking in my sleep?" was all she said. She seemed, however, t_now the situation without telling,though she was eager to know what she ha_old. The Professor repeated the conversation, and she said, "Then there i_ot a moment to lose. It may not be yet too late!"
  • Mr. Morris and Lord Godalming started for the door but the Professor's cal_oice called them back.
  • "Stay, my friends. That ship, wherever it was, was weighing anchor at th_oment in your so great Port of London. Which of them is it that you seek? Go_e thanked that we have once again a clue, though whither it may lead us w_now not. We have been blind somewhat. Blind after the manner of men, since w_an look back we see what we might have seen looking forward if we had bee_ble to see what we might have seen! Alas, but that sentence is a puddle, i_t not? We can know now what was in the Count's mind, when he seize tha_oney, though Jonathan's so fierce knife put him in the danger that even h_read. He meant escape. Hear me, ESCAPE! He saw that with but one earth bo_eft, and a pack of men following like dogs after a fox, this London was n_lace for him. He have take his last earth box on board a ship, and he leav_he land. He think to escape, but no! We follow him. Tally Ho! As frien_rthur would say when he put on his red frock! Our old fox is wily. Oh! S_ily, and we must follow with wile. I, too, am wily and I think his mind in _ittle while. In meantime we may rest and in peace, for there are between u_hich he do not want to pass, and which he could not if he would. Unless th_hip were to touch the land, and then only at full or slack tide. See, and th_un is just rose, and all day to sunset is us. Let us take bath, and dress, and have breakfast which we all need, and which we can eat comfortably sinc_e be not in the same land with us."
  • Mina looked at him appealingly as she asked, "But why need we seek hi_urther, when he is gone away from us?"
  • He took her hand and patted it as he replied, "Ask me nothing as yet. When w_ave breakfast, then I answer all questions." He would say no more, and w_eparated to dress.
  • After breakfast Mina repeated her question. He looked at her gravely for _inute and then said sorrowfully, "Because my dear, dear Madam Mina, now mor_han ever must we find him even if we have to follow him to the jaws of Hell!"
  • She grew paler as she asked faintly, "Why?"
  • "Because," he answered solemnly, "he can live for centuries, and you are bu_ortal woman. Time is now to be dreaded, since once he put that mark upon you_hroat."
  • I was just in time to catch her as she fell forward in a faint.