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Chapter 20 Jonathan Harker's Journal

  • 1 October, evening.—I found Thomas Snelling in his house at Bethnal Green, bu_nhappily he was not in a condition to remember anything. The very prospect o_eer which my expected coming had opened to him had proved too much, and h_ad begun too early on his expected debauch. I learned, however, from hi_ife, who seemed a decent, poor soul, that he was only the assistant o_mollet, who of the two mates was the responsible person. So off I drove t_alworth, and found Mr. Joseph Smollet at home and in his shirtsleeves, takin_ late tea out of a saucer. He is a decent, intelligent fellow, distinctly _ood, reliable type of workman, and with a headpiece of his own. He remembere_ll about the incident of the boxes, and from a wonderful dog-eared notebook, which he produced from some mysterious receptacle about the seat of hi_rousers, and which had hieroglyphical entries in thick, half-obliterate_encil, he gave me the destinations of the boxes. There were, he said, six i_he cartload which he took from Carfax and left at 197 Chicksand Street, Mil_nd New Town, and another six which he deposited at Jamaica Lane, Bermondsey.
  • If then the Count meant to scatter these ghastly refuges of his over London, these places were chosen as the first of delivery, so that later he migh_istribute more fully. The systematic manner in which this was done made m_hink that he could not mean to confine himself to two sides of London. He wa_ow fixed on the far east on the northern shore, on the east of the souther_hore, and on the south. The north and west were surely never meant to be lef_ut of his diabolical scheme, let alone the City itself and the very heart o_ashionable London in the south-west and west. I went back to Smollet, an_sked him if he could tell us if any other boxes had been taken from Carfax.
  • He replied, "Well guv'nor, you've treated me very 'an'some", I had given hi_alf a sovereign, "an I'll tell yer all I know. I heard a man by the name o_loxam say four nights ago in the 'Are an' 'Ounds, in Pincher's Alley, as 'o_e an' his mate 'ad 'ad a rare dusty job in a old 'ouse at Purfleet. Ther_in't a many such jobs as this 'ere, an' I'm thinkin' that maybe Sam Bloxa_ould tell ye summut."
  • I asked if he could tell me where to find him. I told him that if he could ge_e the address it would be worth another half sovereign to him. So he gulpe_own the rest of his tea and stood up, saying that he was going to begin th_earch then and there.
  • At the door he stopped, and said, "Look 'ere, guv'nor, there ain't no sense i_e a keepin' you 'ere. I may find Sam soon, or I mayn't, but anyhow he ain'_ike to be in a way to tell ye much tonight. Sam is a rare one when he start_n the booze. If you can give me a envelope with a stamp on it, and put ye_ddress on it, I'll find out where Sam is to be found and post it ye tonight.
  • But ye'd better be up arter 'im soon in the mornin', never mind the booze th_ight afore."
  • This was all practical, so one of the children went off with a penny to buy a_nvelope and a sheet of paper, and to keep the change. When she came back, _ddressed the envelope and stamped it, and when Smollet had again faithfull_romised to post the address when found, I took my way to home. We're on th_rack anyhow. I am tired tonight, and I want to sleep. Mina is fast asleep, and looks a little too pale. Her eyes look as though she had been crying. Poo_ear, I've no doubt it frets her to be kept in the dark, and it may make he_oubly anxious about me and the others. But it is best as it is. It is bette_o be disappointed and worried in such a way now than to have her nerv_roken. The doctors were quite right to insist on her being kept out of thi_readful business. I must be firm, for on me this particular burden of silenc_ust rest. I shall not ever enter on the subject with her under an_ircumstances. Indeed, It may not be a hard task, after all, for she hersel_as become reticent on the subject, and has not spoken of the Count or hi_oings ever since we told her of our decision.
  • 2 October, evening—A long and trying and exciting day. By the first post I go_y directed envelope with a dirty scrap of paper enclosed, on which wa_ritten with a carpenter's pencil in a sprawling hand, "Sam Bloxam, Korkrans, 4 Poters Cort, Bartel Street, Walworth. Arsk for the depite."
  • I got the letter in bed, and rose without waking Mina. She looked heavy an_leepy and pale, and far from well. I determined not to wake her, but tha_hen I should return from this new search, I would arrange for her going bac_o Exeter. I think she would be happier in our own home, with her daily task_o interest her, than in being here amongst us and in ignorance. I only sa_r. Seward for a moment, and told him where I was off to, promising to com_ack and tell the rest so soon as I should have found out anything. I drove t_alworth and found, with some difficulty, Potter's Court. Mr. Smollet'_pelling misled me, as I asked for Poter's Court instead of Potter's Court.
  • However, when I had found the court, I had no difficulty in discoverin_orcoran's lodging house.
  • When I asked the man who came to the door for the "depite," he shook his head, and said, "I dunno 'im. There ain't no such a person 'ere. I never 'eard of
  • 'im in all my bloomin' days. Don't believe there ain't nobody of that kin_ivin' 'ere or anywheres."
  • I took out Smollet's letter, and as I read it it seemed to me that the lesso_f the spelling of the name of the court might guide me. "What are you?" _sked.
  • "I'm the depity," he answered.
  • I saw at once that I was on the right track. Phonetic spelling had agai_isled me. A half crown tip put the deputy's knowledge at my disposal, and _earned that Mr. Bloxam, who had slept off the remains of his beer on th_revious night at Corcoran's, had left for his work at Poplar at five o'cloc_hat morning. He could not tell me where the place of work was situated, bu_e had a vague idea that it was some kind of a "new-fangled ware'us," and wit_his slender clue I had to start for Poplar. It was twelve o'clock before _ot any satisfactory hint of such a building, and this I got at a coffee shop, where some workmen were having their dinner. One of them suggested that ther_as being erected at Cross Angel Street a new "cold storage" building, and a_his suited the condition of a "new-fangled ware'us," I at once drove to it.
  • An interview with a surly gatekeeper and a surlier foreman, both of whom wer_ppeased with the coin of the realm, put me on the track of Bloxam. He wa_ent for on my suggestion that I was willing to pay his days wages to hi_oreman for the privilege of asking him a few questions on a private matter.
  • He was a smart enough fellow, though rough of speech and bearing. When I ha_romised to pay for his information and given him an earnest, he told me tha_e had made two journeys between Carfax and a house in Piccadilly, and ha_aken from this house to the latter nine great boxes, "main heavy ones," wit_ horse and cart hired by him for this purpose.
  • I asked him if he could tell me the number of the house in Piccadilly, t_hich he replied, "Well, guv'nor, I forgits the number, but it was only a fe_oor from a big white church, or somethink of the kind, not long built. It wa_ dusty old 'ouse, too, though nothin' to the dustiness of the 'ouse we tooke_he bloomin' boxes from."
  • "How did you get in if both houses were empty?"
  • "There was the old party what engaged me a waitin' in the 'ouse at Purfleet.
  • He 'elped me to lift the boxes and put them in the dray. Curse me, but he wa_he strongest chap I ever struck, an' him a old feller, with a whit_oustache, one that thin you would think he couldn't throw a shadder."
  • How this phrase thrilled through me!
  • "Why, 'e took up 'is end o' the boxes like they was pounds of tea, and me _uffin' an' a blowin' afore I could upend mine anyhow, an' I'm no chicken, neither."
  • "How did you get into the house in Piccadilly?" I asked.
  • "He was there too. He must 'a started off and got there afore me, for when _ung of the bell he kem an' opened the door 'isself an' 'elped me carry th_oxes into the 'all."
  • "The whole nine?" I asked.
  • "Yus, there was five in the first load an' four in the second. It was main dr_ork, an' I don't so well remember 'ow I got 'ome."
  • I interrupted him, "Were the boxes left in the hall?"
  • "Yus, it was a big 'all, an' there was nothin' else in it."
  • I made one more attempt to further matters. "You didn't have any key?"
  • "Never used no key nor nothink. The old gent, he opened the door 'isself an'
  • shut it again when I druv off. I don't remember the last time, but that wa_he beer."
  • "And you can't remember the number of the house?"
  • "No, sir. But ye needn't have no difficulty about that. It's a 'igh 'un with _tone front with a bow on it, an' 'igh steps up to the door. I know the_teps, 'avin' 'ad to carry the boxes up with three loafers what come round t_arn a copper. The old gent give them shillin's, an' they seein' they got s_uch, they wanted more. But 'e took one of them by the shoulder and was lik_o throw 'im down the steps, till the lot of them went away cussin'."
  • I thought that with this description I could find the house, so having paid m_riend for his information, I started off for Piccadilly. I had gained a ne_ainful experience. The Count could, it was evident, handle the earth boxe_imself. If so, time was precious, for now that he had achieved a certai_mount of distribution, he could, by choosing his own time, complete the tas_nobserved. At Piccadilly Circus I discharged my cab, and walked westward.
  • Beyond the Junior Constitutional I came across the house described and wa_atisfied that this was the next of the lairs arranged by Dracula. The hous_ooked as though it had been long untenanted. The windows were encrusted wit_ust, and the shutters were up. All the framework was black with time, an_rom the iron the paint had mostly scaled away. It was evident that up t_ately there had been a large notice board in front of the balcony. It had, however, been roughly torn away, the uprights which had supported it stil_emaining. Behind the rails of the balcony I saw there were some loose boards, whose raw edges looked white. I would have given a good deal to have been abl_o see the notice board intact, as it would, perhaps, have given some clue t_he ownership of the house. I remembered my experience of the investigatio_nd purchase of Carfax, and I could not but feel that I could find the forme_wner there might be some means discovered of gaining access to the house.
  • There was at present nothing to be learned from the Piccadilly side, an_othing could be done, so I went around to the back to see if anything coul_e gathered from this quarter. The mews were active, the Piccadilly house_eing mostly in occupation. I asked one or two of the grooms and helpers who_ saw around if they could tell me anything about the empty house. One of the_aid that he heard it had lately been taken, but he couldn't say from whom. H_old me, however, that up to very lately there had been a notice board of "Fo_ale" up, and that perhaps Mitchell, Sons, & Candy the house agents could tel_e something, as he thought he remembered seeing the name of that firm on th_oard. I did not wish to seem too eager, or to let my informant know or gues_oo much, so thanking him in the usual manner,I strolled away. It was no_rowing dusk, and the autumn night was closing in, so I did not lose any time.
  • Having learned the address of Mitchell, Sons, & Candy from a directory at th_erkeley, I was soon at their office in Sackville Street.
  • The gentleman who saw me was particularly suave in manner, but uncommunicativ_n equal proportion. Having once told me that the Piccadilly house, whic_hroughout our interview he called a "mansion," was sold, he considered m_usiness as concluded. When I asked who had purchased it, he opened his eyes _hought wider, and paused a few seconds before replying, "It is sold, sir."
  • "Pardon me," I said, with equal politeness, "but I have a special reason fo_ishing to know who purchased it."
  • Again he paused longer, and raised his eyebrows still more. "It is sold, sir,"
  • was again his laconic reply.
  • "Surely," I said, "you do not mind letting me know so much."
  • "But I do mind," he answered. "The affairs of their clients are absolutel_afe in the hands of Mitchell, Sons, & Candy."
  • This was manifestly a prig of the first water, and there was no use arguin_ith him. I thought I had best meet him on his own ground, so I said, "You_lients, sir, are happy in having so resolute a guardian of their confidence.
  • I am myself a professional man."
  • Here I handed him my card. "In this instance I am not prompted by curiosity, _ct on the part of Lord Godalming, who wishes to know something of th_roperty which was, he understood, lately for sale."
  • These words put a different complexion on affairs. He said, "I would like t_blige you if I could, Mr. Harker, and especially would I like to oblige hi_ordship. We once carried out a small matter of renting some chambers for hi_hen he was the Honorable Arthur Holmwood. If you will let me have hi_ordship's address I will consult the House on the subject, and will, in an_ase, communicate with his lordship by tonight's post. It will be a pleasur_f we can so far deviate from our rules as to give the required information t_is lordship."
  • I wanted to secure a friend, and not to make an enemy, so I thanked him, gav_he address at Dr. Seward's and came away. It was now dark, and I was tire_nd hungry. I got a cup of tea at the Aerated Bread Company and came down t_urfleet by the next train.
  • I found all the others at home. Mina was looking tired and pale, but she mad_ gallant effort to be bright and cheerful. It wrung my heart to think that _ad had to keep anything from her and so caused her inquietude. Thank God, this will be the last night of her looking on at our conferences, and feelin_he sting of our not showing our confidence. It took all my courage to hold t_he wise resolution of keeping her out of our grim task. She seems someho_ore reconciled, or else the very subject seems to have become repugnant t_er, for when any accidental allusion is made she actually shudders. I am gla_e made our resolution in time, as with such a feeling as this,our growin_nowledge would be torture to her.
  • I could not tell the others of the day's discovery till we were alone, s_fter dinner, followed by a little music to save appearances even amongs_urselves, I took Mina to her room and left her to go to bed. The dear gir_as more affectionate with me than ever, and clung to me as though she woul_etain me, but there was much to be talked of and I came away. Thank God, th_easing of telling things has made no difference between us.
  • When I came down again I found the others all gathered round the fire in th_tudy. In the train I had written my diary so far, and simply read it off t_hem as the best means of letting them get abreast of my own information.
  • When I had finished Van Helsing said, "This has been a great day's work, friend Jonathan. Doubtless we are on the track of the missing boxes. If w_ind them all in that house, then our work is near the end. But if there b_ome missing, we must search until we find them. Then shall we make our fina_oup, and hunt the wretch to his real death."
  • We all sat silent awhile and all at once Mr. Morris spoke, "Say! How are w_oing to get into that house?"
  • "We got into the other,"answered Lord Godalming quickly.
  • "But, Art, this is different. We broke house at Carfax, but we had night and _alled park to protect us. It will be a mighty different thing to commi_urglary in Piccadilly, either by day or night. I confess I don't see how w_re going to get in unless that agency duck can find us a key of some sort."
  • Lord Godalming's brows contracted, and he stood up and walked about the room.
  • By-and-by he stopped and said, turning from one to another of us, "Quincey'_ead is level. This burglary business is getting serious. We got off once al_ight, but we have now a rare job on hand. Unless we can find the Count's ke_asket."
  • As nothing could well be done before morning, and as it would be at leas_dvisable to wait till Lord Godalming should hear from Mitchell's, we decide_ot to take any active step before breakfast time. For a good while we sat an_moked, discussing the matter in its various lights and bearings. I took th_pportunity of bringing this diary right up to the moment. I am very sleep_nd shall go to bed …
  • Just a line. Mina sleeps soundly and her breathing is regular. Her forehead i_uckered up into little wrinkles, as though she thinks even in her sleep. Sh_s still too pale, but does not look so haggard as she did this morning.
  • Tomorrow will, I hope, mend all this. She will be herself at home in Exeter.
  • Oh, but I am sleepy!
  • DR. SEWARD'S DIARY
  • 1 October.—I am puzzled afresh about Renfield. His moods change so rapidl_hat I find it difficult to keep touch of them, and as they always mea_omething more than his own well-being, they form a more than interestin_tudy. This morning, when I went to see him after his repulse of Van Helsing, his manner was that of a man commanding destiny. He was, in fact, commandin_estiny, subjectively. He did not really care for any of the things of mer_arth, he was in the clouds and looked down on all the weaknesses and wants o_s poor mortals.
  • I thought I would improve the occasion and learn something, so I asked him,
  • "What about the flies these times?"
  • He smiled on me in quite a superior sort of way, such a smile as would hav_ecome the face of Malvolio, as he answered me, "The fly, my dear sir, has on_triking feature. It's wings are typical of the aerial powers of the psychi_aculties. The ancients did well when they typified the soul as a butterfly!"
  • I thought I would push his analogy to its utmost logically, so I said quickly,
  • "Oh, it is a soul you are after now, is it?"
  • His madness foiled his reason, and a puzzled look spread over his face as, shaking his head with a decision which I had but seldom seen in him.
  • He said, "Oh, no, oh no! I want no souls. Life is all I want." Here h_rightened up. "I am pretty indifferent about it at present. Life is al_ight. I have all I want. You must get a new patient, doctor, if you wish t_tudy zoophagy!"
  • This puzzled me a little, so I drew him on. "Then you command life. You are _od, I suppose?"
  • He smiled with an ineffably benign superiority. "Oh no! Far be it from me t_rrogate to myself the attributes of the Deity. I am not even concerned in Hi_specially spiritual doings. If I may state my intellectual position I am, s_ar as concerns things purely terrestrial, somewhat in the position whic_noch occupied spiritually!"
  • This was a poser to me. I could not at the moment recall Enoch's appositeness, so I had to ask a simple question, though I felt that by so doing I wa_owering myself in the eyes of the lunatic. "And why with Enoch?"
  • "Because he walked with God."
  • I could not see the analogy, but did not like to admit it, so I harked back t_hat he had denied. "So you don't care about life and you don't want souls.
  • Why not?" I put my question quickly and somewhat sternly, on purpose t_isconcert him.
  • The effort succeeded, for an instant he unconsciously relapsed into his ol_ervile manner, bent low before me, and actually fawned upon me as he replied.
  • "I don't want any souls, indeed, indeed! I don't. I couldn't use them if I ha_hem. They would be no manner of use to me. I couldn't eat them or … "
  • He suddenly stopped and the old cunning look spread over his face, like a win_weep on the surface of the water.
  • "And doctor, as to life, what is it after all? When you've got all yo_equire, and you know that you will never want, that is all. I have friends, good friends, like you, Dr. Seward."This was said with a leer of inexpressibl_unning. "I know that I shall never lack the means of life!"
  • I think that through the cloudiness of his insanity he saw some antagonism i_e, for he at once fell back on the last refuge of such as he, a dogge_ilence. After a short time I saw that for the present it was useless to spea_o him. He was sulky, and so I came away.
  • Later in the day he sent for me. Ordinarily I would not have come withou_pecial reason, but just at present I am so interested in him that I woul_ladly make an effort. Besides, I am glad to have anything to help pass th_ime. Harker is out, following up clues, and so are Lord Godalming an_uincey. Van Helsing sits in my study poring over the record prepared by th_arkers. He seems to think that by accurate knowledge of all details he wil_ight up on some clue. He does not wish to be disturbed in the work, withou_ause. I would have taken him with me to see the patient, only I thought tha_fter his last repulse he might not care to go again. There was also anothe_eason. Renfield might not speak so freely before a third person as when h_nd I were alone.
  • I found him sitting in the middle of the floor on his stool, a pose which i_enerally indicative of some mental energy on his part. When I came in, h_aid at once, as though the question had been waiting on his lips. "What abou_ouls?"
  • It was evident then that my surmise had been correct. Unconscious cerebratio_as doing its work, even with the lunatic. I determined to have the matte_ut.
  • "What about them yourself?" I asked.
  • He did not reply for a moment but looked all around him, and up and down, a_hough he expected to find some inspiration for an answer.
  • "I don't want any souls!" He said in a feeble, apologetic way. The matte_eemed preying on his mind, and so I determined to use it, to "be cruel onl_o be kind." So I said, "You like life, and you want life?"
  • "Oh yes! But that is all right. You needn't worry about that!"
  • "But," I asked,"how are we to get the life without getting the soul also?"
  • This seemed to puzzle him, so I followed it up, "A nice time you'll have som_ime when you're flying out here, with the souls of thousands of flies an_piders and birds and cats buzzing and twittering and moaning all around you.
  • You've got their lives, you know, and you must put up with their souls!"
  • Something seemed to affect his imagination, for he put his fingers to his ear_nd shut his eyes, screwing them up tightly just as a small boy does when hi_ace is being soaped. There was something pathetic in it that touched me. I_lso gave me a lesson, for it seemed that before me was a child, only a child, though the features were worn, and the stubble on the jaws was white. It wa_vident that he was undergoing some process of mental disturbance, and knowin_ow his past moods had interpreted things seemingly foreign to himself, _hought I would enter into his mind as well as I could and go with him
  • The first step was to restore confidence, so I asked him, speaking pretty lou_o that he would hear me through his closed ears,"Would you like some sugar t_et your flies around again?"
  • He seemed to wake up all at once, and shook his head. With a laugh he replied,
  • "Not much! Flies are poor things, after all!" After a pause he added, "But _on't want their souls buzzing round me, all the same."
  • "Or spiders?" I went on.
  • "Blow spiders! What's the use of spiders? There isn't anything in them to ea_r … " He stopped suddenly as though reminded of a forbidden topic.
  • "So, so!" I thought to myself, "this is the second time he has suddenl_topped at the word `drink'. What does it mean?"
  • Renfield seemed himself aware of having made a lapse, for he hurried on, a_hough to distract my attention from it, "I don't take any stock at all i_uch matters. `Rats and mice and such small deer,' as Shakespeare has it, `chicken feed of the larder' they might be called. I'm past all that sort o_onsense. You might as well ask a man to eat molecules with a pair o_hopsticks, as to try to interest me about the less carnivora, when I know o_hat is before me."
  • "I see," I said."You want big things that you can make your teeth meet in? Ho_ould you like to breakfast on an elephant?"
  • "What ridiculous nonsense you are talking?" He was getting too wide awake, s_ thought I would press him hard.
  • "I wonder," I said reflectively, "what an elephant's soul is like!"
  • The effect I desired was obtained, for he at once fell from his high-horse an_ecame a child again.
  • "I don't want an elephant's soul, or any soul at all!" he said. For a fe_oments he sat despondently. Suddenly he jumped to his feet, with his eye_lazing and all the signs of intense cerebral excitement. "To hell with yo_nd your souls!" he shouted. "Why do you plague me about souls? Haven't I go_nough to worry, and pain, to distract me already, without thinking of souls?"
  • He looked so hostile that I thought he was in for another homicidal fit, so _lew my whistle.
  • The instant, however, that I did so he became calm, and said apologetically,
  • "Forgive me, Doctor. I forgot myself. You do not need any help. I am s_orried in my mind that I am apt to be irritable. If you only knew the proble_ have to face, and that I am working out, you would pity, and tolerate, an_ardon me. Pray do not put me in a strait waistcoat. I want to think and _annot think freely when my body is confined. I am sure you will understand!"
  • He had evidently self-control, so when the attendants came I told them not t_ind, and they withdrew. Renfield watched them go. When the door was closed h_aid with considerable dignity and sweetness, "Dr. Seward, you have been ver_onsiderate towards me. Believe me that I am very, very grateful to you!"
  • I thought it well to leave him in this mood, and so I came away. There i_ertainly something to ponder over in this man's state. Several points seem t_ake what the American interviewer calls "a story," if one could only get the_n proper order. Here they are:
  • Will not mention "drinking."
  • Fears the thought of being burdened with the "soul" of anything.
  • Has no dread of wanting "life" in the future.
  • Despises the meaner forms of life altogether, though he dreads being haunte_y their souls.
  • Logically all these things point one way! He has assurance of some kind tha_e will acquire some higher life.
  • He dreads the consequence, the burden of a soul. Then it is a human life h_ooks to!
  • And the assurance …  ?
  • Merciful God! The Count has been to him, and there is some new scheme o_error afoot!
  • Later.—I went after my round to Van Helsing and told him my suspicion. He gre_ery grave, and after thinking the matter over for a while asked me to tak_im to Renfield. I did so. As we came to the door we heard the lunatic withi_inging gaily, as he used to do in the time which now seems so long ago.
  • When we entered we saw with amazement that he had spread out his sugar as o_ld. The flies, lethargic with the autumn, were beginning to buzz into th_oom. We tried to make him talk of the subject of our previous conversation, but he would not attend. He went on with his singing, just as though we ha_ot been present. He had got a scrap of paper and was folding it into _otebook. We had to come away as ignorant as we went in.
  • His is a curious case indeed. We must watch him tonight.
  • LETTER, MITCHELL, SONS & CANDY TO LORD GODALMING.
  • "1 October. "My Lord,
  • "We are at all times only too happy to meet your wishes. We beg, with regar_o the desire of your Lordship, expressed by Mr. Harker on your behalf, t_upply the following information concerning the sale and purchase o_o.347,Piccadilly. The original vendors are the executors of the late Mr.
  • Archibald Winter-Suffield. The purchaser is a foreign nobleman, Count d_ille, who effected the purchase himself paying the purchase money in notes `over the counter,' if your Lordship will pardon us using so vulgar a_xpression. Beyond this we know nothing whatever of him.
  • "We are, my Lord,
  • "Your Lordship's humble servants,
  • "MITCHELL, SONS & CANDY."
  • DR. SEWARD'S DIARY
  • 2 October.—I placed a man in the corridor last night, and told him to make a_ccurate note of any sound he might hear from Renfield's room, and gave hi_nstructions that if there should be anything strange he was to call me. Afte_inner, when we had all gathered round the fire in the study, Mrs. Harke_aving gone to bed, we discussed the attempts and discoveries of the day.
  • Harker was the only one who had any result, and we are in great hopes that hi_lue may be an important one.
  • Before going to bed I went round to the patient's room and looked in throug_he observation trap. He was sleeping soundly, his heart rose and fell wit_egular respiration.
  • This morning the man on duty reported to me that a little after midnight h_as restless and kept saying his prayers somewhat loudly. I asked him if tha_as all. He replied that it was all he heard. There was something about hi_anner, so suspicious that I asked him point blank if he had been asleep. H_enied sleep, but admitted to having "dozed" for a while. It is too bad tha_en cannot be trusted unless they are watched.
  • Today Harker is out following up his clue, and Art and Quincey are lookin_fter horses. Godalming thinks that it will be well to have horses always i_eadiness, for when we get the information which we seek there will be no tim_o lose. We must sterilize all the imported earth between sunrise and sunset.
  • We shall thus catch the Count at his weakest, and without a refuge to fly to.
  • Van Helsing is off to the British Museum looking up some authorities o_ncient medicine. The old physicians took account of things which thei_ollowers do not accept, and the Professor is searching for witch and demo_ures which may be useful to us later.
  • I sometimes think we must be all mad and that we shall wake to sanity i_trait waistcoats.
  • Later.—We have met again. We seem at last to be on the track, and our work o_omorrow may be the beginning of the end. I wonder if Renfield's quiet ha_nything to do with this. His moods have so followed the doings of the Count, that the coming destruction of the monster may be carried to him some subtl_ay. If we could only get some hint as to what passed in his mind, between th_ime of my argument with him today and his resumption of fly-catching, i_ight afford us a valuable clue. He is now seemingly quiet for a spell … I_e? That wild yell seemed to come from his room …
  • The attendant came bursting into my room and told me that Renfield had someho_et with some accident. He had heard him yell, and when he went to him foun_im lying on his face on the floor, all covered with blood. I must go at once …