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Chapter 3

  • The fact was that up to the last moment he had never expected such an ending; he had been overbearing to the last degree, never dreaming that two destitut_nd defenceless women could escape from his control. This conviction wa_trengthened by his vanity and conceit, a conceit to the point of fatuity.
  • Pyotr Petrovitch, who had made his way up from insignificance, was morbidl_iven to self-admiration, had the highest opinion of his intelligence an_apacities, and sometimes even gloated in solitude over his image in th_lass. But what he loved and valued above all was the money he had amassed b_is labour, and by all sorts of devices: that money made him the equal of al_ho had been his superiors.
  • When he had bitterly reminded Dounia that he had decided to take her in spit_f evil report, Pyotr Petrovitch had spoken with perfect sincerity and had, indeed, felt genuinely indignant at such "black ingratitude." And yet, when h_ade Dounia his offer, he was fully aware of the groundlessness of all th_ossip. The story had been everywhere contradicted by Marfa Petrovna, and wa_y then disbelieved by all the townspeople, who were warm in Dounia'a defence.
  • And he would not have denied that he knew all that at the time. Yet he stil_hought highly of his own resolution in lifting Dounia to his level an_egarded it as something heroic. In speaking of it to Dounia, he had let ou_he secret feeling he cherished and admired, and he could not understand tha_thers should fail to admire it too. He had called on Raskolnikov with th_eelings of a benefactor who is about to reap the fruits of his good deeds an_o hear agreeable flattery. And as he went downstairs now, he considere_imself most undeservedly injured and unrecognised.
  • Dounia was simply essential to him; to do without her was unthinkable. Fo_any years he had had voluptuous dreams of marriage, but he had gone o_aiting and amassing money. He brooded with relish, in profound secret, ove_he image of a girl—virtuous, poor (she must be poor), very young, ver_retty, of good birth and education, very timid, one who had suffered much, and was completely humbled before him, one who would all her life look on hi_s her saviour, worship him, admire him and only him. How many scenes, ho_any amorous episodes he had imagined on this seductive and playful theme, when his work was over! And, behold, the dream of so many years was all bu_ealised; the beauty and education of Avdotya Romanovna had impressed him; he_elpless position had been a great allurement; in her he had found even mor_han he dreamed of. Here was a girl of pride, character, virtue, of educatio_nd breeding superior to his own (he felt that), and this creature would b_lavishly grateful all her life for his heroic condescension, and would humbl_erself in the dust before him, and he would have absolute, unbounded powe_ver her! … Not long before, he had, too, after long reflection an_esitation, made an important change in his career and was now entering on _ider circle of business. With this change his cherished dreams of rising int_ higher class of society seemed likely to be realised… . He was, in fact, determined to try his fortune in Petersburg. He knew that women could do _ery great deal. The fascination of a charming, virtuous, highly educate_oman might make his way easier, might do wonders in attracting people to him, throwing an aureole round him, and now everything was in ruins! This sudde_orrible rupture affected him like a clap of thunder; it was like a hideou_oke, an absurdity. He had only been a tiny bit masterful, had not even tim_o speak out, had simply made a joke, been carried away —and it had ended s_eriously. And, of course, too, he did love Dounia in his own way; he alread_ossessed her in his dreams—and all at once! No! The next day, the very nex_ay, it must all be set right, smoothed over, settled. Above all he must crus_hat conceited milksop who was the cause of it all. With a sick feeling h_ould not help recalling Razumihin too, but, he soon reassured himself on tha_core; as though a fellow like that could be put on a level with him! The ma_e really dreaded in earnest was Svidrigaïlov… . He had, in short, a grea_eal to attend to… .
  • "No, I, I am more to blame than anyone!" said Dounia, kissing and embracin_er mother. "I was tempted by his money, but on my honour, brother, I had n_dea he was such a base man. If I had seen through him before, nothing woul_ave tempted me! Don't blame me, brother!"
  • "God has delivered us! God has delivered us!" Pulcheria Alexandrovna muttered, but half consciously, as though scarcely able to realise what had happened.
  • They were all relieved, and in five minutes they were laughing. Only now an_hen Dounia turned white and frowned, remembering what had passed. Pulcheri_lexandrovna was surprised to find that she, too, was glad: she had only tha_orning thought rupture with Luzhin a terrible misfortune. Razumihin wa_elighted. He did not yet dare to express his joy fully, but he was in a feve_f excitement as though a ton-weight had fallen off his heart. Now he had th_ight to devote his life to them, to serve them… . Anything might happen now!
  • But he felt afraid to think of further possibilities and dared not let hi_magination range. But Raskolnikov sat still in the same place, almost sulle_nd indifferent. Though he had been the most insistent on getting rid o_uzhin, he seemed now the least concerned at what had happened. Dounia coul_ot help thinking that he was still angry with her, and Pulcheria Alexandrovn_atched him timidly.
  • "What did Svidrigaïlov say to you?" said Dounia, approaching him.
  • "Yes, yes!" cried Pulcheria Alexandrovna.
  • Raskolnikov raised his head.
  • "He wants to make you a present of ten thousand roubles and he desires to se_ou once in my presence."
  • "See her! On no account!" cried Pulcheria Alexandrovna. "And how dare he offe_er money!"
  • Then Raskolnikov repeated (rather dryly) his conversation with Svidrigaïlov, omitting his account of the ghostly visitations of Marfa Petrovna, wishing t_void all unnecessary talk.
  • "What answer did you give him?" asked Dounia.
  • "At first I said I would not take any message to you. Then he said that h_ould do his utmost to obtain an interview with you without my help. H_ssured me that his passion for you was a passing infatuation, now he has n_eeling for you. He doesn't want you to marry Luzhin… . His talk wa_ltogether rather muddled."
  • "How do you explain him to yourself, Rodya? How did he strike you?"
  • "I must confess I don't quite understand him. He offers you ten thousand, an_et says he is not well off. He says he is going away, and in ten minutes h_orgets he has said it. Then he says is he going to be married and has alread_ixed on the girl… . No doubt he has a motive, and probably a bad one. Bu_t's odd that he should be so clumsy about it if he had any designs agains_ou… . Of course, I refused this money on your account, once for all.
  • Altogether, I thought him very strange… . One might almost think he was mad.
  • But I may be mistaken; that may only be the part he assumes. The death o_arfa Petrovna seems to have made a great impression on him."
  • "God rest her soul," exclaimed Pulcheria Alexandrovna. "I shall always, alway_ray for her! Where should we be now, Dounia, without this three thousand!
  • It's as though it had fallen from heaven! Why, Rodya, this morning we had onl_hree roubles in our pocket and Dounia and I were just planning to pawn he_atch, so as to avoid borrowing from that man until he offered help."
  • Dounia seemed strangely impressed by Svidrigaïlov's offer. She still stoo_editating.
  • "He has got some terrible plan," she said in a half whisper to herself, almos_huddering.
  • Raskolnikov noticed this disproportionate terror.
  • "I fancy I shall have to see him more than once again," he said to Dounia.
  • "We will watch him! I will track him out!" cried Razumihin, vigorously. "_on't lose sight of him. Rodya has given me leave. He said to me himself jus_ow. 'Take care of my sister.' Will you give me leave, too, Avdoty_omanovna?"
  • Dounia smiled and held out her hand, but the look of anxiety did not leave he_ace. Pulcheria Alexandrovna gazed at her timidly, but the three thousan_oubles had obviously a soothing effect on her.
  • A quarter of an hour later, they were all engaged in a lively conversation.
  • Even Raskolnikov listened attentively for some time, though he did not talk.
  • Razumihin was the speaker.
  • "And why, why should you go away?" he flowed on ecstatically. "And what ar_ou to do in a little town? The great thing is, you are all here together an_ou need one another—you do need one another, believe me. For a time, anyway… . Take me into partnership, and I assure you we'll plan a capital enterprise.
  • Listen! I'll explain it all in detail to you, the whole project! It al_lashed into my head this morning, before anything had happened … I tell yo_hat; I have an uncle, I must introduce him to you (a most accommodating an_espectable old man). This uncle has got a capital of a thousand roubles, an_e lives on his pension and has no need of that money. For the last two year_e has been bothering me to borrow it from him and pay him six per cent.
  • interest. I know what that means; he simply wants to help me. Last year I ha_o need of it, but this year I resolved to borrow it as soon as he arrived.
  • Then you lend me another thousand of your three and we have enough for _tart, so we'll go into partnership, and what are we going to do?"
  • Then Razumihin began to unfold his project, and he explained at length tha_lmost all our publishers and booksellers know nothing at all of what they ar_elling, and for that reason they are usually bad publishers, and that an_ecent publications pay as a rule and give a profit, sometimes a considerabl_ne. Razumihin had, indeed, been dreaming of setting up as a publisher. Fo_he last two years he had been working in publishers' offices, and knew thre_uropean languages well, though he had told Raskolnikov six days before tha_e was "schwach" in German with an object of persuading him to take half hi_ranslation and half the payment for it. He had told a lie then, an_askolnikov knew he was lying.
  • "Why, why should we let our chance slip when we have one of the chief means o_uccess—money of our own!" cried Razumihin warmly. "Of course there will be _ot of work, but we will work, you, Avdotya Romanovna, I, Rodion… . You get _plendid profit on some books nowadays! And the great point of the business i_hat we shall know just what wants translating, and we shall be translating, publishing, learning all at once. I can be of use because I have experience.
  • For nearly two years I've been scuttling about among the publishers, and now _now every detail of their business. You need not be a saint to make pots, believe me! And why, why should we let our chance slip! Why, I know—and I kep_he secret—two or three books which one might get a hundred roubles simply fo_hinking of translating and publishing. Indeed, and I would not take fiv_undred for the very idea of one of them. And what do you think? If I were t_ell a publisher, I dare say he'd hesitate—they are such blockheads! And a_or the business side, printing, paper, selling, you trust to me, I know m_ay about. We'll begin in a small way and go on to a large. In any case i_ill get us our living and we shall get back our capital."
  • Dounia's eyes shone.
  • "I like what you are saying, Dmitri Prokofitch!" she said.
  • "I know nothing about it, of course," put in Pulcheria Alexandrovna, "it ma_e a good idea, but again God knows. It's new and untried. Of course, we mus_emain here at least for a time." She looked at Rodya.
  • "What do you think, brother?" said Dounia.
  • "I think he's got a very good idea," he answered. "Of course, it's too soon t_ream of a publishing firm, but we certainly might bring out five or six book_nd be sure of success. I know of one book myself which would be sure to g_ell. And as for his being able to manage it, there's no doubt about tha_ither. He knows the business… . But we can talk it over later… ."
  • "Hurrah!" cried Razumihin. "Now, stay, there's a flat here in this house, belonging to the same owner. It's a special flat apart, not communicating wit_hese lodgings. It's furnished, rent moderate, three rooms. Suppose you tak_hem to begin with. I'll pawn your watch to-morrow and bring you the money, and everything can be arranged then. You can all three live together, an_odya will be with you. But where are you off to, Rodya?"
  • "What, Rodya, you are going already?" Pulcheria Alexandrovna asked in dismay.
  • "At such a minute?" cried Razumihin.
  • Dounia looked at her brother with incredulous wonder. He held his cap in hi_and, he was preparing to leave them.
  • "One would think you were burying me or saying good-bye for ever," he sai_omewhat oddly. He attempted to smile, but it did not turn out a smile. "Bu_ho knows, perhaps it is the last time we shall see each other … " he let sli_ccidentally. It was what he was thinking, and it somehow was uttered aloud.
  • "What is the matter with you?" cried his mother.
  • "Where are you going, Rodya?" asked Dounia rather strangely.
  • "Oh, I'm quite obliged to … " he answered vaguely, as though hesitating wha_e would say. But there was a look of sharp determination in his white face.
  • "I meant to say … as I was coming here … I meant to tell you, mother, and you, Dounia, that it would be better for us to part for a time. I feel ill, I a_ot at peace… . I will come afterwards, I will come of myself … when it'_ossible. I remember you and love you… . Leave me, leave me alone. I decide_his even before … I'm absolutely resolved on it. Whatever may come to me, whether I come to ruin or not, I want to be alone. Forget me altogether, it'_etter. Don't inquire about me. When I can, I'll come of myself or … I'll sen_or you. Perhaps it will all come back, but now if you love me, give me up … else I shall begin to hate you, I feel it… . Good-bye!"
  • "Good God!" cried Pulcheria Alexandrovna. Both his mother and his sister wer_erribly alarmed. Razumihin was also.
  • "Rodya, Rodya, be reconciled with us! Let us be as before!" cried his poo_other.
  • He turned slowly to the door and slowly went out of the room. Dounia overtoo_im.
  • "Brother, what are you doing to mother?" she whispered, her eyes flashing wit_ndignation.
  • He looked dully at her.
  • "No matter, I shall come… . I'm coming," he muttered in an undertone, a_hough not fully conscious of what he was saying, and he went out of the room.
  • "Wicked, heartless egoist!" cried Dounia.
  • "He is insane, but not heartless. He is mad! Don't you see it? You'r_eartless after that!" Razumihin whispered in her ear, squeezing her han_ightly. "I shall be back directly," he shouted to the horror- stricke_other, and he ran out of the room.
  • Raskolnikov was waiting for him at the end of the passage.
  • "I knew you would run after me," he said. "Go back to them—be with them … b_ith them to-morrow and always… . I … perhaps I shall come … if I can. Good- bye."
  • And without holding out his hand he walked away.
  • "But where are you going? What are you doing? What's the matter with you? Ho_an you go on like this?" Razumihin muttered, at his wits' end.
  • Raskolnikov stopped once more.
  • "Once for all, never ask me about anything. I have nothing to tell you. Don'_ome to see me. Maybe I'll come here… . Leave me, but don't leave them. Do yo_nderstand me?"
  • It was dark in the corridor, they were standing near the lamp. For a minut_hey were looking at one another in silence. Razumihin remembered that minut_ll his life. Raskolnikov's burning and intent eyes grew more penetratin_very moment, piercing into his soul, into his consciousness. Suddenl_azumihin started. Something strange, as it were, passed between them… . Som_dea, some hint, as it were, slipped, something awful, hideous, and suddenl_nderstood on both sides… . Razumihin turned pale.
  • "Do you understand now?" said Raskolnikov, his face twitching nervously. "G_ack, go to them," he said suddenly, and turning quickly, he went out of th_ouse.
  • I will not attempt to describe how Razumihin went back to the ladies, how h_oothed them, how he protested that Rodya needed rest in his illness, protested that Rodya was sure to come, that he would come every day, that h_as very, very much upset, that he must not be irritated, that he, Razumihin, would watch over him, would get him a doctor, the best doctor, a consultation… . In fact from that evening Razumihin took his place with them as a son and _rother.