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Chapter 7

  • **WHICH ONCE MORE DEMONSTRATES THE USELESSNESS OF PASSPORTS AS AIDS T_ETECTIVES**
  • The detective passed down the quay, and rapidly made his way to the consul'_ffice, where he was at once admitted to the presence of that official.
  • "Consul," said he, without preamble, "I have strong reasons for believing tha_y man is a passenger on the Mongolia." And he narrated what had just passe_oncerning the passport.
  • "Well, Mr. Fix," replied the consul, "I shall not be sorry to see the rascal'_ace; but perhaps he won't come here—that is, if he is the person you suppos_im to be. A robber doesn't quite like to leave traces of his flight behin_im; and, besides, he is not obliged to have his passport countersigned."
  • "If he is as shrewd as I think he is, consul, he will come."
  • "To have his passport visaed?"
  • "Yes. Passports are only good for annoying honest folks, and aiding in th_light of rogues. I assure you it will be quite the thing for him to do; but _ope you will not visa the passport."
  • "Why not? If the passport is genuine I have no right to refuse."
  • "Still, I must keep this man here until I can get a warrant to arrest him fro_ondon."
  • "Ah, that's your look-out. But I cannot—"
  • The consul did not finish his sentence, for as he spoke a knock was heard a_he door, and two strangers entered, one of whom was the servant whom Fix ha_et on the quay. The other, who was his master, held out his passport with th_equest that the consul would do him the favour to visa it. The consul too_he document and carefully read it, whilst Fix observed, or rather devoured,
  • the stranger with his eyes from a corner of the room.
  • "You are Mr. Phileas Fogg?" said the consul, after reading the passport.
  • "I am."
  • "And this man is your servant?"
  • "He is: a Frenchman, named Passepartout."
  • "You are from London?"
  • "Yes."
  • "And you are going—"
  • "To Bombay."
  • "Very good, sir. You know that a visa is useless, and that no passport i_equired?"
  • "I know it, sir," replied Phileas Fogg; "but I wish to prove, by your visa,
  • that I came by Suez."
  • "Very well, sir."
  • The consul proceeded to sign and date the passport, after which he added hi_fficial seal. Mr. Fogg paid the customary fee, coldly bowed, and went out,
  • followed by his servant.
  • "Well?" queried the detective.
  • "Well, he looks and acts like a perfectly honest man," replied the consul.
  • "Possibly; but that is not the question. Do you think, consul, that thi_hlegmatic gentleman resembles, feature by feature, the robber whos_escription I have received?"
  • "I concede that; but then, you know, all descriptions—"
  • "I'll make certain of it," interrupted Fix. "The servant seems to me les_ysterious than the master; besides, he's a Frenchman, and can't help talking.
  • Excuse me for a little while, consul."
  • Fix started off in search of Passepartout.
  • Meanwhile Mr. Fogg, after leaving the consulate, repaired to the quay, gav_ome orders to Passepartout, went off to the Mongolia in a boat, and descende_o his cabin. He took up his note-book, which contained the followin_emoranda:
  • "Left London, Wednesday, October 2nd, at 8.45 p.m.
  • "Reached Paris, Thursday, October 3rd, at 7.20 a.m.
  • "Left Paris, Thursday, at 8.40 a.m.
  • "Reached Turin by Mont Cenis, Friday, October 4th, at 6.35 a.m.
  • "Left Turin, Friday, at 7.20 a.m.
  • "Arrived at Brindisi, Saturday, October 5th, at 4 p.m.
  • "Sailed on the Mongolia, Saturday, at 5 p.m.
  • "Reached Suez, Wednesday, October 9th, at 11 a.m.
  • "Total of hours spent, 158+; or, in days, six days and a half."
  • These dates were inscribed in an itinerary divided into columns, indicatin_he month, the day of the month, and the day for the stipulated and actua_rrivals at each principal point Paris, Brindisi, Suez, Bombay, Calcutta,
  • Singapore, Hong Kong, Yokohama, San Francisco, New York, and London—from th_nd of October to the 21st of December; and giving a space for setting dow_he gain made or the loss suffered on arrival at each locality. Thi_ethodical record thus contained an account of everything needed, and Mr. Fog_lways knew whether he was behind-hand or in advance of his time. On thi_riday, October 9th, he noted his arrival at Suez, and observed that he had a_et neither gained nor lost. He sat down quietly to breakfast in his cabin,
  • never once thinking of inspecting the town, being one of those Englishmen wh_re wont to see foreign countries through the eyes of their domestics.