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Chapter 4

  • **IN WHICH PHILEAS FOGG ASTOUNDS PASSEPARTOUT, HIS SERVANT**
  • Having won twenty guineas at whist, and taken leave of his friends, Philea_ogg, at twenty-five minutes past seven, left the Reform Club.
  • Passepartout, who had conscientiously studied the programme of his duties, wa_ore than surprised to see his master guilty of the inexactness of appearin_t this unaccustomed hour; for, according to rule, he was not due in Savill_ow until precisely midnight.
  • Mr. Fogg repaired to his bedroom, and called out, "Passepartout!"
  • Passepartout did not reply. It could not be he who was called; it was not th_ight hour.
  • "Passepartout!" repeated Mr. Fogg, without raising his voice.
  • Passepartout made his appearance.
  • "I've called you twice," observed his master.
  • "But it is not midnight," responded the other, showing his watch.
  • "I know it; I don't blame you. We start for Dover and Calais in ten minutes."
  • A puzzled grin overspread Passepartout's round face; clearly he had no_omprehended his master.
  • "Monsieur is going to leave home?"
  • "Yes," returned Phileas Fogg. "We are going round the world."
  • Passepartout opened wide his eyes, raised his eyebrows, held up his hands, an_eemed about to collapse, so overcome was he with stupefied astonishment.
  • "Round the world!" he murmured.
  • "In eighty days," responded Mr. Fogg. "So we haven't a moment to lose."
  • "But the trunks?" gasped Passepartout, unconsciously swaying his head fro_ight to left.
  • "We'll have no trunks; only a carpet-bag, with two shirts and three pairs o_tockings for me, and the same for you. We'll buy our clothes on the way.
  • Bring down my mackintosh and traveling-cloak, and some stout shoes, though w_hall do little walking. Make haste!"
  • Passepartout tried to reply, but could not. He went out, mounted to his ow_oom, fell into a chair, and muttered: "That's good, that is! And I, wh_anted to remain quiet!"
  • He mechanically set about making the preparations for departure. Around th_orld in eighty days! Was his master a fool? No. Was this a joke, then? The_ere going to Dover; good! To Calais; good again! After all, Passepartout, wh_ad been away from France five years, would not be sorry to set foot on hi_ative soil again. Perhaps they would go as far as Paris, and it would do hi_yes good to see Paris once more. But surely a gentleman so chary of his step_ould stop there; no doubt— but, then, it was none the less true that he wa_oing away, this so domestic person hitherto!
  • By eight o'clock Passepartout had packed the modest carpet-bag, containing th_ardrobes of his master and himself; then, still troubled in mind, h_arefully shut the door of his room, and descended to Mr. Fogg.
  • Mr. Fogg was quite ready. Under his arm might have been observed a red-boun_opy of Bradshaw's Continental Railway Steam Transit and General Guide, wit_ts timetables showing the arrival and departure of steamers and railways. H_ook the carpet-bag, opened it, and slipped into it a goodly roll of Bank o_ngland notes, which would pass wherever he might go.
  • "You have forgotten nothing?" asked he.
  • "Nothing, monsieur."
  • "My mackintosh and cloak?"
  • "Here they are."
  • "Good! Take this carpet-bag," handing it to Passepartout. "Take good care o_t, for there are twenty thousand pounds in it."
  • Passepartout nearly dropped the bag, as if the twenty thousand pounds were i_old, and weighed him down.
  • Master and man then descended, the street-door was double-locked, and at th_nd of Saville Row they took a cab and drove rapidly to Charing Cross. The ca_topped before the railway station at twenty minutes past eight. Passepartou_umped off the box and followed his master, who, after paying the cabman, wa_bout to enter the station, when a poor beggar-woman, with a child in he_rms, her naked feet smeared with mud, her head covered with a wretche_onnet, from which hung a tattered feather, and her shoulders shrouded in _agged shawl, approached, and mournfully asked for alms.
  • Mr. Fogg took out the twenty guineas he had just won at whist, and handed the_o the beggar, saying, "Here, my good woman. I'm glad that I met you;" an_assed on.
  • Passepartout had a moist sensation about the eyes; his master's action touche_is susceptible heart.
  • Two first-class tickets for Paris having been speedily purchased, Mr. Fogg wa_rossing the station to the train, when he perceived his five friends of th_eform.
  • "Well, gentlemen," said he, "I'm off, you see; and, if you will examine m_assport when I get back, you will be able to judge whether I hav_ccomplished the journey agreed upon."
  • "Oh, that would be quite unnecessary, Mr. Fogg," said Ralph politely. "We wil_rust your word, as a gentleman of honour."
  • "You do not forget when you are due in London again?" asked Stuart.
  • "In eighty days; on Saturday, the 21st of December, 1872, at a quarter befor_ine p.m. Good-bye, gentlemen."
  • Phileas Fogg and his servant seated themselves in a first-class carriage a_wenty minutes before nine; five minutes later the whistle screamed, and th_rain slowly glided out of the station.
  • The night was dark, and a fine, steady rain was falling. Phileas Fogg, snugl_nsconced in his corner, did not open his lips. Passepartout, not ye_ecovered from his stupefaction, clung mechanically to the carpet-bag, wit_ts enormous treasure.
  • Just as the train was whirling through Sydenham, Passepartout suddenly uttere_ cry of despair.
  • "What's the matter?" asked Mr. Fogg.
  • "Alas! In my hurry—I—I forgot—"
  • "What?"
  • "To turn off the gas in my room!"
  • "Very well, young man," returned Mr. Fogg, coolly; "it will burn— at you_xpense."