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Chapter 3

  • **IN WHICH A CONVERSATION TAKES PLACE WHICH SEEMS LIKELY TO COST PHILEAS FOG_EAR**
  • Phileas Fogg, having shut the door of his house at half-past eleven, an_aving put his right foot before his left five hundred and seventy-five times, and his left foot before his right five hundred and seventy-six times, reache_he Reform Club, an imposing edifice in Pall Mall, which could not have cos_ess than three million to build.
  • He repaired at once to the dining-room, the nine windows
  • of which open upon a tasteful garden, where the trees were already gilded wit_n autumn colouring; and took his place at the habitual table, the cover o_hich had already been laid for him. His breakfast consisted of a side-dish, _roiled fish with Reading sauce, a scarlet slice of roast beef garnished wit_ushrooms, a rhubarb and gooseberry tart, and a morsel of Cheshire cheese, th_hole being washed down with several cups of tea, for which the Reform i_amous. He rose at thirteen minutes to one, and directed his steps towards th_arge hall, a sumptuous apartment adorned with lavishly-framed paintings. _lunkey handed him an uncut Times, which he proceeded to cut with a skil_hich betrayed familiarity with this delicate operation. The perusal of thi_aper absorbed Phileas Fogg until a quarter before four, whilst the Standard, his next task, occupied him till the dinner hour. Dinner passed as breakfas_ad done, and Mr. Fogg re-appeared in the reading-room and sat down to th_all Mall at twenty minutes before six. Half an hour later several members o_he Reform came in and drew up to the fireplace, where a coal fire wa_teadily burning. They were Mr. Fogg's usual partners at whist: Andrew Stuart, an engineer; John Sullivan and Samuel Fallentin, bankers; Thomas Flanagan, _rewer; and Gauthier Ralph, one of the Directors of the Bank of England— al_ich and highly respectable personages, even in a club which comprises th_rinces of English trade and finance.
  • "Well, Ralph," said Thomas Flanagan, "what about that robbery?"
  • "Oh," replied Stuart, "the Bank will lose the money."
  • "On the contrary," broke in Ralph, "I hope we may put our hands on the robber.
  • Skilful detectives have been sent to all the principal ports of America an_he Continent, and he'll be a clever fellow if he slips through thei_ingers."
  • "But have you got the robber's description?" asked Stuart.
  • "In the first place, he is no robber at all," returned Ralph, positively.
  • "What! a fellow who makes off with fifty-five thousand pounds, no robber?"
  • "No."
  • "Perhaps he's a manufacturer, then."
  • "The Daily Telegraph says that he is a gentleman."
  • It was Phileas Fogg, whose head now emerged from behind his newspapers, wh_ade this remark. He bowed to his friends, and entered into the conversation.
  • The affair which formed its subject, and which was town talk, had occurre_hree days before at the Bank of England. A package of banknotes, to the valu_f fifty-five thousand pounds, had been taken from the principal cashier'_able, that functionary being at the moment engaged in registering the receip_f three shillings and sixpence. Of course, he could not have his eye_verywhere. Let it be observed that the Bank of England reposes a touchin_onfidence in the honesty of the public. There are neither guards nor grating_o protect its treasures; gold, silver, banknotes are freely exposed, at th_ercy of the first comer. A keen observer of English customs relates that, being in one of the rooms of the Bank one day, he had the curiosity to examin_ gold ingot weighing some seven or eight pounds. He took it up, scrutinise_t, passed it to his neighbour, he to the next man, and so on until the ingot, going from hand to hand, was transferred to the end of a dark entry; nor di_t return to its place for half an hour. Meanwhile, the cashier had not s_uch as raised his head. But in the present instance things had not gone s_moothly. The package of notes not being found when five o'clock sounded fro_he ponderous clock in the "drawing office," the amount was passed to th_ccount of profit and loss. As soon as the robbery was discovered, picke_etectives hastened off to Liverpool, Glasgow, Havre, Suez, Brindisi, Ne_ork, and other ports, inspired by the proffered reward of two thousan_ounds, and five per cent. on the sum that might be recovered. Detectives wer_lso charged with narrowly watching those who arrived at or left London b_ail, and a judicial examination was at once entered upon.
  • There were real grounds for supposing, as the Daily Telegraph said, that th_hief did not belong to a professional band. On the day of the robbery a well- dressed gentleman of polished manners, and with a well-to-do air, had bee_bserved going to and fro in the paying room where the crime was committed. _escription of him was easily procured and sent to the detectives; and som_opeful spirits, of whom Ralph was one, did not despair of his apprehension.
  • The papers and clubs were full of the affair, and everywhere people wer_iscussing the probabilities of a successful pursuit; and the Reform Club wa_specially agitated, several of its members being Bank officials.
  • Ralph would not concede that the work of the detectives was likely to be i_ain, for he thought that the prize offered would greatly stimulate their zea_nd activity. But Stuart was far from sharing this confidence; and, as the_laced themselves at the whist-table, they continued to argue the matter.
  • Stuart and Flanagan played together, while Phileas Fogg had Fallentin for hi_artner. As the game proceeded the conversation ceased, excepting between th_ubbers, when it revived again.
  • "I maintain," said Stuart, "that the chances are in favour of the thief, wh_ust be a shrewd fellow."
  • "Well, but where can he fly to?" asked Ralph. "No country is safe for him."
  • "Pshaw!"
  • "Where could he go, then?"
  • "Oh, I don't know that. The world is big enough."
  • "It was once," said Phileas Fogg, in a low tone. "Cut, sir," he added, handin_he cards to Thomas Flanagan.
  • The discussion fell during the rubber, after which Stuart took up its thread.
  • "What do you mean by `once'? Has the world grown smaller?"
  • "Certainly," returned Ralph. "I agree with Mr. Fogg. The world has grow_maller, since a man can now go round it ten times more quickly than a hundre_ears ago. And that is why the search for this thief will be more likely t_ucceed."
  • "And also why the thief can get away more easily."
  • "Be so good as to play, Mr. Stuart," said Phileas Fogg.
  • But the incredulous Stuart was not convinced, and when the hand was finished, said eagerly: "You have a strange way, Ralph, of proving that the world ha_rown smaller. So, because you can go round it in three months—"
  • "In eighty days," interrupted Phileas Fogg.
  • "That is true, gentlemen," added John Sullivan. "Only eighty days, now tha_he section between Rothal and Allahabad, on the Great Indian Peninsul_ailway, has been opened. Here is the estimate made by the Daily Telegraph:
  • From London to Suez via Mont Cenis and
  • Brindisi, by rail and steamboats … … … … … .. 7 days
  • From Suez to Bombay, by steamer … … … … … … .. 13 "
  • From Bombay to Calcutta, by rail … … … … … … . 3 "
  • From Calcutta to Hong Kong, by steamer … … … … . 13 "
  • From Hong Kong to Yokohama (Japan), by steamer … .. 6 "
  • From Yokohama to San Francisco, by steamer … … … 22 "
  • From San Francisco to New York, by rail … … … … . 7 "
  • From New York to London, by steamer and rail … … .. 9 "
  • ——
  • Total … … … … … … … … … … … … … … .. 80 days."
  • "Yes, in eighty days!" exclaimed Stuart, who in his excitement made a fals_eal. "But that doesn't take into account bad weather, contrary winds, shipwrecks, railway accidents, and so on."
  • "All included," returned Phileas Fogg, continuing to play despite th_iscussion.
  • "But suppose the Hindoos or Indians pull up the rails," replied Stuart;
  • "suppose they stop the trains, pillage the luggage-vans, and scalp th_assengers!"
  • "All included," calmly retorted Fogg; adding, as he threw down the cards, "Tw_rumps."
  • Stuart, whose turn it was to deal, gathered them up, and went on: "You ar_ight, theoretically, Mr. Fogg, but practically—"
  • "Practically also, Mr. Stuart."
  • "I'd like to see you do it in eighty days."
  • "It depends on you. Shall we go?"
  • "Heaven preserve me! But I would wager four thousand pounds that such _ourney, made under these conditions, is impossible."
  • "Quite possible, on the contrary," returned Mr. Fogg.
  • "Well, make it, then!"
  • "The journey round the world in eighty days?"
  • "Yes."
  • "I should like nothing better."
  • "When?"
  • "At once. Only I warn you that I shall do it at your expense."
  • "It's absurd!" cried Stuart, who was beginning to be annoyed at th_ersistency of his friend. "Come, let's go on with the game."
  • "Deal over again, then," said Phileas Fogg. "There's a false deal."
  • Stuart took up the pack with a feverish hand; then suddenly put them dow_gain.
  • "Well, Mr. Fogg," said he, "it shall be so: I will wager the four thousand o_t."
  • "Calm yourself, my dear Stuart," said Fallentin. "It's only a joke."
  • "When I say I'll wager," returned Stuart, "I mean it." "All right," said Mr.
  • Fogg; and, turning to the others, he continued: "I have a deposit of twent_housand at Baring's which I will willingly risk upon it."
  • "Twenty thousand pounds!" cried Sullivan. "Twenty thousand pounds, which yo_ould lose by a single accidental delay!"
  • "The unforeseen does not exist," quietly replied Phileas Fogg.
  • "But, Mr. Fogg, eighty days are only the estimate of the least possible tim_n which the journey can be made."
  • "A well-used minimum suffices for everything."
  • "But, in order not to exceed it, you must jump mathematically from the train_pon the steamers, and from the steamers upon the trains again."
  • "I will jump—mathematically."
  • "You are joking."
  • "A true Englishman doesn't joke when he is talking about so serious a thing a_ wager," replied Phileas Fogg, solemnly. "I will bet twenty thousand pound_gainst anyone who wishes that I will make the tour of the world in eight_ays or less; in nineteen hundred and twenty hours, or a hundred and fiftee_housand two hundred minutes. Do you accept?"
  • "We accept," replied Messrs. Stuart, Fallentin, Sullivan, Flanagan, and Ralph, after consulting each other.
  • "Good," said Mr. Fogg. "The train leaves for Dover at a quarter before nine. _ill take it."
  • "This very evening?" asked Stuart.
  • "This very evening," returned Phileas Fogg. He took out and consulted a pocke_lmanac, and added, "As today is Wednesday, the 2nd of October, I shall be du_n London in this very room of the Reform Club, on Saturday, the 21st o_ecember, at a quarter before nine p.m.; or else the twenty thousand pounds, now deposited in my name at Baring's, will belong to you, in fact and i_ight, gentlemen. Here is a cheque for the amount."
  • A memorandum of the wager was at once drawn up and signed by the six parties, during which Phileas Fogg preserved a stoical composure. He certainly did no_et to win, and had only staked the twenty thousand pounds, half of hi_ortune, because he foresaw that he might have to expend the other half t_arry out this difficult, not to say unattainable, project. As for hi_ntagonists, they seemed much agitated; not so much by the value of thei_take, as because they had some scruples about betting under conditions s_ifficult to their friend.
  • The clock struck seven, and the party offered to suspend the game so that Mr.
  • Fogg might make his preparations for departure.
  • "I am quite ready now," was his tranquil response. "Diamonds are trumps: be s_ood as to play, gentlemen."