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Chapter 24

  • **DURING WHICH MR. FOGG AND PARTY CROSS THE PACIFIC OCEAN**
  • What happened when the pilot-boat came in sight of Shanghai will be easil_uessed. The signals made by the Tankadere had been seen by the captain of th_okohama steamer, who, espying the flag at half-mast, had directed his cours_owards the little craft. Phileas Fogg, after paying the stipulated price o_is passage to John Busby, and rewarding that worthy with the additional su_f five hundred and fifty pounds, ascended the steamer with Aouda and Fix; an_hey started at once for Nagasaki and Yokohama.
  • They reached their destination on the morning of the 14th of November. Philea_ogg lost no time in going on board the Carnatic, where he learned, to Aouda'_reat delight—and perhaps to his own, though he betrayed no emotion—tha_assepartout, a Frenchman, had really arrived on her the day before.
  • The San Francisco steamer was announced to leave that very evening, and i_ecame necessary to find Passepartout, if possible, without delay. Mr. Fog_pplied in vain to the French and English consuls, and, after wanderin_hrough the streets a long time, began to despair of finding his missin_ervant. Chance, or perhaps a kind of presentiment, at last led him into th_onourable Mr. Batulcar's theatre. He certainly would not have recognise_assepartout in the eccentric mountebank's costume; but the latter, lying o_is back, perceived his master in the gallery. He could not help starting,
  • which so changed the position of his nose as to bring the "pyramid" pell-mel_pon the stage.
  • All this Passepartout learned from Aouda, who recounted to him what had take_lace on the voyage from Hong Kong to Shanghai on the Tankadere, in compan_ith one Mr. Fix.
  • Passepartout did not change countenance on hearing this name. He thought tha_he time had not yet arrived to divulge to his master what had taken plac_etween the detective and himself; and, in the account he gave of his absence,
  • he simply excused himself for having been overtaken by drunkenness, in smokin_pium at a tavern in Hong Kong.
  • Mr. Fogg heard this narrative coldly, without a word; and then furnished hi_an with funds necessary to obtain clothing more in harmony with his position.
  • Within an hour the Frenchman had cut off his nose and parted with his wings,
  • and retained nothing about him which recalled the sectary of the god Tingou.
  • The steamer which was about to depart from Yokohama to San Francisco belonge_o the Pacific Mail Steamship Company, and was named the General Grant. Sh_as a large paddle-wheel steamer of two thousand five hundred tons; wel_quipped and very fast. The massive walking-beam rose and fell above the deck;
  • at one end a piston-rod worked up and down; and at the other was a connecting-
  • rod which, in changing the rectilinear motion to a circular one, was directl_onnected with the shaft of the paddles. The General Grant was rigged wit_hree masts, giving a large capacity for sails, and thus materially aiding th_team power. By making twelve miles an hour, she would cross the ocean i_wenty-one days. Phileas Fogg was therefore justified in hoping that he woul_each San Francisco by the 2nd of December, New York by the 11th, and Londo_n the 20th—thus gaining several hours on the fatal date of the 21st o_ecember.
  • There was a full complement of passengers on board, among them English, man_mericans, a large number of coolies on their way to California, and severa_ast Indian officers, who were spending their vacation in making the tour o_he world. Nothing of moment happened on the voyage; the steamer, sustained o_ts large paddles, rolled but little, and the Pacific almost justified it_ame. Mr. Fogg was as calm and taciturn as ever. His young companion fel_erself more and more attached to him by other ties than gratitude; his silen_ut generous nature impressed her more than she thought; and it was almos_nconsciously that she yielded to emotions which did not seem to have th_east effect upon her protector. Aouda took the keenest interest in his plans,
  • and became impatient at any incident which seemed likely to retard hi_ourney.
  • She often chatted with Passepartout, who did not fail to perceive the state o_he lady's heart; and, being the most faithful of domestics, he neve_xhausted his eulogies of Phileas Fogg's honesty, generosity, and devotion. H_ook pains to calm Aouda's doubts of a successful termination of the journey,
  • telling her that the most difficult part of it had passed, that now they wer_eyond the fantastic countries of Japan and China, and were fairly on thei_ay to civilised places again. A railway train from San Francisco to New York,
  • and a transatlantic steamer from New York to Liverpool, would doubtless brin_hem to the end of this impossible journey round the world within the perio_greed upon.
  • On the ninth day after leaving Yokohama, Phileas Fogg had traversed exactl_ne half of the terrestrial globe. The General Grant passed, on the 23rd o_ovember, the one hundred and eightieth meridian, and was at the ver_ntipodes of London. Mr. Fogg had, it is true, exhausted fifty-two of th_ighty days in which he was to complete the tour, and there were only twenty-
  • eight left. But, though he was only half-way by the difference of meridians,
  • he had really gone over two-thirds of the whole journey; for he had bee_bliged to make long circuits from London to Aden, from Aden to Bombay, fro_alcutta to Singapore, and from Singapore to Yokohama. Could he have followe_ithout deviation the fiftieth parallel, which is that of London, the whol_istance would only have been about twelve thousand miles; whereas he would b_orced, by the irregular methods of locomotion, to traverse twenty-si_housand, of which he had, on the 23rd of November, accomplished seventee_housand five hundred. And now the course was a straight one, and Fix was n_onger there to put obstacles in their way!
  • It happened also, on the 23rd of November, that Passepartout made a joyfu_iscovery. It will be remembered that the obstinate fellow had insisted o_eeping his famous family watch at London time, and on regarding that of th_ountries he had passed through as quite false and unreliable. Now, on thi_ay, though he had not changed the hands, he found that his watch exactl_greed with the ship's chronometers. His triumph was hilarious. He would hav_iked to know what Fix would say if he were aboard!
  • "The rogue told me a lot of stories," repeated Passepartout, "about th_eridians, the sun, and the moon! Moon, indeed! moonshine more likely! If on_istened to that sort of people, a pretty sort of time one would keep! I wa_ure that the sun would some day regulate itself by my watch!"
  • Passepartout was ignorant that, if the face of his watch had been divided int_wenty-four hours, like the Italian clocks, he would have no reason fo_xultation; for the hands of his watch would then, instead of as no_ndicating nine o'clock in the morning, indicate nine o'clock in the evening,
  • that is, the twenty-first hour after midnight precisely the difference betwee_ondon time and that of the one hundred and eightieth meridian. But if Fix ha_een able to explain this purely physical effect, Passepartout would not hav_dmitted, even if he had comprehended it. Moreover, if the detective had bee_n board at that moment, Passepartout would have joined issue with him on _uite different subject, and in an entirely different manner.
  • Where was Fix at that moment?
  • He was actually on board the General Grant.
  • On reaching Yokohama, the detective, leaving Mr. Fogg, whom he expected t_eet again during the day, had repaired at once to the English consulate,
  • where he at last found the warrant of arrest. It had followed him from Bombay,
  • and had come by the Carnatic, on which steamer he himself was supposed to be.
  • Fix's disappointment may be imagined when he reflected that the warrant wa_ow useless. Mr. Fogg had left English ground, and it was now necessary t_rocure his extradition!
  • "Well," thought Fix, after a moment of anger, "my warrant is not good here,
  • but it will be in England. The rogue evidently intends to return to his ow_ountry, thinking he has thrown the police off his track. Good! I will follo_im across the Atlantic. As for the money, heaven grant there may be som_eft! But the fellow has already spent in travelling, rewards, trials, bail,
  • elephants, and all sorts of charges, more than five thousand pounds. Yet,
  • after all, the Bank is rich!"
  • His course decided on, he went on board the General Grant, and was there whe_r. Fogg and Aouda arrived. To his utter amazement, he recognise_assepartout, despite his theatrical disguise. He quickly concealed himself i_is cabin, to avoid an awkward explanation, and hoped—thanks to the number o_assengers—to remain unperceived by Mr. Fogg's servant.
  • On that very day, however, he met Passepartout face to face on the forwar_eck. The latter, without a word, made a rush for him, grasped him by th_hroat, and, much to the amusement of a group of Americans, who immediatel_egan to bet on him, administered to the detective a perfect volley of blows,
  • which proved the great superiority of French over English pugilistic skill.
  • When Passepartout had finished, he found himself relieved and comforted. Fi_ot up in a somewhat rumpled condition, and, looking at his adversary, coldl_aid, "Have you done?"
  • "For this time—yes."
  • "Then let me have a word with you."
  • "But I—"
  • "In your master's interests."
  • Passepartout seemed to be vanquished by Fix's coolness, for he quietl_ollowed him, and they sat down aside from the rest of the passengers.
  • "You have given me a thrashing," said Fix. "Good, I expected it. Now, liste_o me. Up to this time I have been Mr. Fogg's adversary. I am now in hi_ame."
  • "Aha!" cried Passepartout; "you are convinced he is an honest man?"
  • "No," replied Fix coldly, "I think him a rascal. Sh! don't budge, and let m_peak. As long as Mr. Fogg was on English ground, it was for my interest t_etain him there until my warrant of arrest arrived. I did everything I coul_o keep him back. I sent the Bombay priests after him, I got you intoxicate_t Hong Kong, I separated you from him, and I made him miss the Yokoham_teamer."
  • Passepartout listened, with closed fists.
  • "Now," resumed Fix, "Mr. Fogg seems to be going back to England. Well, I wil_ollow him there. But hereafter I will do as much to keep obstacles out of hi_ay as I have done up to this time to put them in his path. I've changed m_ame, you see, and simply because it was for my interest to change it. You_nterest is the same as mine; for it is only in England that you wil_scertain whether you are in the service of a criminal or an honest man."
  • Passepartout listened very attentively to Fix, and was convinced that he spok_ith entire good faith.
  • "Are we friends?" asked the detective.
  • "Friends?—no," replied Passepartout; "but allies, perhaps. At the least sig_f treason, however, I'll twist your neck for you."
  • "Agreed," said the detective quietly.
  • Eleven days later, on the 3rd of December, the General Grant entered the ba_f the Golden Gate, and reached San Francisco.
  • Mr. Fogg had neither gained nor lost a single day.