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Chapter 22

  • **IN WHICH PASSEPARTOUT FINDS OUT THAT, EVEN AT THE ANTIPODES, IT I_ONVENIENT TO HAVE SOME MONEY IN ONE'S POCKET**
  • The Carnatic, setting sail from Hong Kong at half-past six on the 7th o_ovember, directed her course at full steam towards Japan. She carried a larg_argo and a well-filled cabin of passengers. Two state-rooms in the rear were,
  • however, unoccupied—those which had been engaged by Phileas Fogg.
  • The next day a passenger with a half-stupefied eye, staggering gait, an_isordered hair, was seen to emerge from the second cabin, and to totter to _eat on deck.
  • It was Passepartout; and what had happened to him was as follows: Shortl_fter Fix left the opium den, two waiters had lifted the unconsciou_assepartout, and had carried him to the bed reserved for the smokers. Thre_ours later, pursued even in his dreams by a fixed idea, the poor fello_woke, and struggled against the stupefying influence of the narcotic. Th_hought of a duty unfulfilled shook off his torpor, and he hurried from th_bode of drunkenness. Staggering and holding himself up by keeping against th_alls, falling down and creeping up again, and irresistibly impelled by a kin_f instinct, he kept crying out, "The Carnatic! the Carnatic!"
  • The steamer lay puffing alongside the quay, on the point of starting.
  • Passepartout had but few steps to go; and, rushing upon the plank, he crosse_t, and fell unconscious on the deck, just as the Carnatic was moving off.
  • Several sailors, who were evidently accustomed to this sort of scene, carrie_he poor Frenchman down into the second cabin, and Passepartout did not wak_ntil they were one hundred and fifty miles away from China. Thus he foun_imself the next morning on the deck of the Carnatic, and eagerly inhaling th_xhilarating sea-breeze. The pure air sobered him. He began to collect hi_ense, which he found a difficult task; but at last he recalled the events o_he evening before, Fix's revelation, and the opium-house.
  • "It is evident," said he to himself, "that I have been abominably drunk! Wha_ill Mr. Fogg say? At least I have not missed the steamer, which is the mos_mportant thing."
  • Then, as Fix occurred to him: "As for that rascal, I hope we are well rid o_im, and that he has not dared, as he proposed, to follow us on board th_arnatic. A detective on the track of Mr. Fogg, accused of robbing the Bank o_ngland! Pshaw! Mr. Fogg is no more a robber than I am a murderer."
  • Should he divulge Fix's real errand to his master? Would it do to tell th_art the detective was playing. Would it not be better to wait until Mr. Fog_eached London again, and then impart to him that an agent of the metropolita_olice had been following him round the world, and have a good laugh over it?
  • No doubt; at least, it was worth considering. The first thing to do was t_ind Mr. Fogg, and apologise for his singular behaviour.
  • Passepartout got up and proceeded, as well as he could with the rolling of th_teamer, to the after-deck. He saw no one who resembled either his master o_ouda. "Good!" muttered he; "Aouda has not got up yet, and Mr. Fogg ha_robably found some partners at whist."
  • He descended to the saloon. Mr. Fogg was not there. Passepartout had only,
  • however, to ask the purser the number of his master's state-room. The purse_eplied that he did not know any passenger by the name of Fogg.
  • "I beg your pardon," said Passepartout persistently. "He is a tall gentleman,
  • quiet, and not very talkative, and has with him a young lady—"
  • "There is no young lady on board," interrupted the purser. "Here is a list o_he passengers; you may see for yourself."
  • Passepartout scanned the list, but his master's name was not upon it. All a_nce an idea struck him.
  • "Ah! am I on the Carnatic?"
  • "Yes."
  • "On the way to Yokohama?"
  • "Certainly."
  • Passepartout had for an instant feared that he was on the wrong boat; but,
  • though he was really on the Carnatic, his master was not there.
  • He fell thunderstruck on a seat. He saw it all now. He remembered that th_ime of sailing had been changed, that he should have informed his master o_hat fact, and that he had not done so. It was his fault, then, that Mr. Fog_nd Aouda had missed the steamer. Yes, but it was still more the fault of th_raitor who, in order to separate him from his master, and detain the latte_t Hong Kong, had inveigled him into getting drunk! He now saw the detective'_rick; and at this moment Mr. Fogg was certainly ruined, his bet was lost, an_e himself perhaps arrested and imprisoned! At this thought Passepartout tor_is hair. Ah, if Fix ever came within his reach, what a settling of account_here would be!
  • After his first depression, Passepartout became calmer, and began to study hi_ituation. It was certainly not an enviable one. He found himself on the wa_o Japan, and what should he do when he got there? His pocket was empty; h_ad not a solitary shilling, not so much as a penny. His passage ha_ortunately been paid for in advance; and he had five or six days in which t_ecide upon his future course. He fell to at meals with an appetite, and at_or Mr. Fogg, Aouda, and himself. He helped himself as generously as if Japa_ere a desert, where nothing to eat was to be looked for.
  • At dawn on the 13th the Carnatic entered the port of Yokohama. This is a_mportant port of call in the Pacific, where all the mail-steamers, and thos_arrying travellers between North America, China, Japan, and the Orienta_slands put in. It is situated in the bay of Yeddo, and at but a shor_istance from that second capital of the Japanese Empire, and the residence o_he Tycoon, the civil Emperor, before the Mikado, the spiritual Emperor,
  • absorbed his office in his own. The Carnatic anchored at the quay near th_ustom-house, in the midst of a crowd of ships bearing the flags of al_ations.
  • Passepartout went timidly ashore on this so curious territory of the Sons o_he Sun. He had nothing better to do than, taking chance for his guide, t_ander aimlessly through the streets of Yokohama. He found himself at first i_ thoroughly European quarter, the houses having low fronts, and being adorne_ith verandas, beneath which he caught glimpses of neat peristyles. Thi_uarter occupied, with its streets, squares, docks, and warehouses, all th_pace between the "promontory of the Treaty" and the river. Here, as at Hon_ong and Calcutta, were mixed crowds of all races, Americans and English,
  • Chinamen and Dutchmen, mostly merchants ready to buy or sell anything. Th_renchman felt himself as much alone among them as if he had dropped down i_he midst of Hottentots.
  • He had, at least, one resource to call on the French and English consuls a_okohama for assistance. But he shrank from telling the story of hi_dventures, intimately connected as it was with that of his master; and,
  • before doing so, he determined to exhaust all other means of aid. As chanc_id not favour him in the European quarter, he penetrated that inhabited b_he native Japanese, determined, if necessary, to push on to Yeddo.
  • The Japanese quarter of Yokohama is called Benten, after the goddess of th_ea, who is worshipped on the islands round about. There Passepartout behel_eautiful fir and cedar groves, sacred gates of a singular architecture,
  • bridges half hid in the midst of bamboos and reeds, temples shaded by immens_edar-trees, holy retreats where were sheltered Buddhist priests and sectarie_f Confucius, and interminable streets, where a perfect harvest of rose-tinte_nd red-cheeked children, who looked as if they had been cut out of Japanes_creens, and who were playing in the midst of short-legged poodles an_ellowish cats, might have been gathered.
  • The streets were crowded with people. Priests were passing in processions,
  • beating their dreary tambourines; police and custom-house officers wit_ointed hats encrusted with lac and carrying two sabres hung to their waists;
  • soldiers, clad in blue cotton with white stripes, and bearing guns; th_ikado's guards, enveloped in silken doubles, hauberks and coats of mail; an_umbers of military folk of all ranks—for the military profession is as muc_espected in Japan as it is despised in China—went hither and thither i_roups and pairs. Passepartout saw, too, begging friars, long-robed pilgrims,
  • and simple civilians, with their warped and jet-black hair, big heads, lon_usts, slender legs, short stature, and complexions varying from copper-colou_o a dead white, but never yellow, like the Chinese, from whom the Japanes_idely differ. He did not fail to observe the curious equipages—carriages an_alanquins, barrows supplied with sails, and litters made of bamboo; nor th_omen— whom he thought not especially handsome—who took little steps wit_heir little feet, whereon they wore canvas shoes, straw sandals, and clogs o_orked wood, and who displayed tight-looking eyes, flat chests, teet_ashionably blackened, and gowns crossed with silken scarfs, tied in a_normous knot behind an ornament which the modern Parisian ladies seem to hav_orrowed from the dames of Japan.
  • Passepartout wandered for several hours in the midst of this motley crowd,
  • looking in at the windows of the rich and curious shops, the jeweller_stablishments glittering with quaint Japanese ornaments, the restaurant_ecked with streamers and banners, the tea-houses, where the odorous beverag_as being drunk with saki, a liquor concocted from the fermentation of rice,
  • and the comfortable smoking-houses, where they were puffing, not opium, whic_s almost unknown in Japan, but a very fine, stringy tobacco. He went on til_e found himself in the fields, in the midst of vast rice plantations. Ther_e saw dazzling camellias expanding themselves, with flowers which were givin_orth their last colours and perfumes, not on bushes, but on trees, and withi_amboo enclosures, cherry, plum, and apple trees, which the Japanese cultivat_ather for their blossoms than their fruit, and which queerly-fashioned,
  • grinning scarecrows protected from the sparrows, pigeons, ravens, and othe_oracious birds. On the branches of the cedars were perched large eagles; ami_he foliage of the weeping willows were herons, solemnly standing on one leg;
  • and on every hand were crows, ducks, hawks, wild birds, and a multitude o_ranes, which the Japanese consider sacred, and which to their minds symbolis_ong life and prosperity.
  • As he was strolling along, Passepartout espied some violets among the shrubs.
  • "Good!" said he; "I'll have some supper."
  • But, on smelling them, he found that they were odourless.
  • "No chance there," thought he.
  • The worthy fellow had certainly taken good care to eat as hearty a breakfas_s possible before leaving the Carnatic; but, as he had been walking about al_ay, the demands of hunger were becoming importunate. He observed that th_utchers stalls contained neither mutton, goat, nor pork; and, knowing als_hat it is a sacrilege to kill cattle, which are preserved solely for farming,
  • he made up his mind that meat was far from plentiful in Yokohama— nor was h_istaken; and, in default of butcher's meat, he could have wished for _uarter of wild boar or deer, a partridge, or some quails, some game or fish,
  • which, with rice, the Japanese eat almost exclusively. But he found i_ecessary to keep up a stout heart, and to postpone the meal he craved til_he following morning. Night came, and Passepartout re-entered the nativ_uarter, where he wandered through the streets, lit by vari-coloured lanterns,
  • looking on at the dancers, who were executing skilful steps and boundings, an_he astrologers who stood in the open air with their telescopes. Then he cam_o the harbour, which was lit up by the resin torches of the fishermen, wh_ere fishing from their boats.
  • The streets at last became quiet, and the patrol, the officers of which, i_heir splendid costumes, and surrounded by their suites, Passepartout though_eemed like ambassadors, succeeded the bustling crowd. Each time a compan_assed, Passepartout chuckled, and said to himself: "Good! another Japanes_mbassy departing for Europe!"