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Chapter 20

  • **IN WHICH FIX COMES FACE TO FACE WITH PHILEAS FOGG**
  • While these events were passing at the opium-house, Mr. Fogg, unconscious o_he danger he was in of losing the steamer, was quietly escorting Aouda abou_he streets of the English quarter, making the necessary purchases for th_ong voyage before them. It was all very well for an Englishman like Mr. Fog_o make the tour of the world with a carpet-bag; a lady could not be expecte_o travel comfortably under such conditions. He acquitted his task wit_haracteristic serenity, and invariably replied to the remonstrances of hi_air companion, who was confused by his patience and generosity:
  • "It is in the interest of my journey—a part of my programme."
  • The purchases made, they returned to the hotel, where they dined at _umptuously served table-d'hote; after which Aouda, shaking hands with he_rotector after the English fashion, retired to her room for rest. Mr. Fog_bsorbed himself throughout the evening in the perusal of The Times an_llustrated London News.
  • Had he been capable of being astonished at anything, it would have been not t_ee his servant return at bedtime. But, knowing that the steamer was not t_eave for Yokohama until the next morning, he did not disturb himself abou_he matter. When Passepartout did not appear the next morning to answer hi_aster's bell, Mr. Fogg, not betraying the least vexation, contented himsel_ith taking his carpet-bag, calling Aouda, and sending for a palanquin.
  • It was then eight o'clock; at half-past nine, it being then high tide, th_arnatic would leave the harbour. Mr. Fogg and Aouda got into the palanquin, their luggage being brought after on a wheelbarrow, and half an hour late_tepped upon the quay whence they were to embark. Mr. Fogg then learned tha_he Carnatic had sailed the evening before. He had expected to find not onl_he steamer, but his domestic, and was forced to give up both; but no sign o_isappointment appeared on his face, and he merely remarked to Aouda, "It i_n accident, madam; nothing more."
  • At this moment a man who had been observing him attentively approached. It wa_ix, who, bowing, addressed Mr. Fogg: "Were you not, like me, sir, a passenge_y the Rangoon, which arrived yesterday?"
  • "I was, sir," replied Mr. Fogg coldly. "But I have not the honour—"
  • "Pardon me; I thought I should find your servant here."
  • "Do you know where he is, sir?" asked Aouda anxiously.
  • "What!" responded Fix, feigning surprise. "Is he not with you?"
  • "No," said Aouda. "He has not made his appearance since yesterday. Could h_ave gone on board the Carnatic without us?"
  • "Without you, madam?" answered the detective. "Excuse me, did you intend t_ail in the Carnatic?"
  • "Yes, sir."
  • "So did I, madam, and I am excessively disappointed. The Carnatic, its repair_eing completed, left Hong Kong twelve hours before the stated time, withou_ny notice being given; and we must now wait a week for another steamer."
  • As he said "a week" Fix felt his heart leap for joy. Fogg detained at Hon_ong for a week! There would be time for the warrant to arrive, and fortune a_ast favoured the representative of the law. His horror may be imagined whe_e heard Mr. Fogg say, in his placid voice, "But there are other vessel_esides the Carnatic, it seems to me, in the harbour of Hong Kong."
  • And, offering his arm to Aouda, he directed his steps toward the docks i_earch of some craft about to start. Fix, stupefied, followed; it seemed as i_e were attached to Mr. Fogg by an invisible thread. Chance, however, appeare_eally to have abandoned the man it had hitherto served so well. For thre_ours Phileas Fogg wandered about the docks, with the determination, i_ecessary, to charter a vessel to carry him to Yokohama; but he could onl_ind vessels which were loading or unloading, and which could not therefor_et sail. Fix began to hope again.
  • But Mr. Fogg, far from being discouraged, was continuing his search, resolve_ot to stop if he had to resort to Macao, when he was accosted by a sailor o_ne of the wharves.
  • "Is your honour looking for a boat?"
  • "Have you a boat ready to sail?"
  • "Yes, your honour; a pilot-boat—No. 43—the best in the harbour."
  • "Does she go fast?"
  • "Between eight and nine knots the hour. Will you look at her?"
  • "Yes."
  • "Your honour will be satisfied with her. Is it for a sea excursion?"
  • "No; for a voyage."
  • "A voyage?"
  • "Yes, will you agree to take me to Yokohama?"
  • The sailor leaned on the railing, opened his eyes wide, and said, "Is you_onour joking?"
  • "No. I have missed the Carnatic, and I must get to Yokohama by the 14th at th_atest, to take the boat for San Francisco."
  • "I am sorry," said the sailor; "but it is impossible."
  • "I offer you a hundred pounds per day, and an additional reward of two hundre_ounds if I reach Yokohama in time."
  • "Are you in earnest?"
  • "Very much so."
  • The pilot walked away a little distance, and gazed out to sea, evidentl_truggling between the anxiety to gain a large sum and the fear of venturin_o far. Fix was in mortal suspense.
  • Mr. Fogg turned to Aouda and asked her, "You would not be afraid, would you, madam?"
  • "Not with you, Mr. Fogg," was her answer.
  • The pilot now returned, shuffling his hat in his hands.
  • "Well, pilot?" said Mr. Fogg.
  • "Well, your honour," replied he, "I could not risk myself, my men, or m_ittle boat of scarcely twenty tons on so long a voyage at this time of year.
  • Besides, we could not reach Yokohama in time, for it is sixteen hundred an_ixty miles from Hong Kong."
  • "Only sixteen hundred," said Mr. Fogg.
  • "It's the same thing."
  • Fix breathed more freely.
  • "But," added the pilot, "it might be arranged another way."
  • Fix ceased to breathe at all.
  • "How?" asked Mr. Fogg.
  • "By going to Nagasaki, at the extreme south of Japan, or even to Shanghai, which is only eight hundred miles from here. In going to Shanghai we shoul_ot be forced to sail wide of the Chinese coast, which would be a grea_dvantage, as the currents run northward, and would aid us."
  • "Pilot," said Mr. Fogg, "I must take the American steamer at Yokohama, and no_t Shanghai or Nagasaki."
  • "Why not?" returned the pilot. "The San Francisco steamer does not start fro_okohama. It puts in at Yokohama and Nagasaki, but it starts from Shanghai."
  • "You are sure of that?"
  • "Perfectly."
  • "And when does the boat leave Shanghai?"
  • "On the 11th, at seven in the evening. We have, therefore, four days befor_s, that is ninety-six hours; and in that time, if we had good luck and _outh-west wind, and the sea was calm, we could make those eight hundred mile_o Shanghai."
  • "And you could go—"
  • "In an hour; as soon as provisions could be got aboard and the sails put up."
  • "It is a bargain. Are you the master of the boat?"
  • "Yes; John Bunsby, master of the Tankadere."
  • "Would you like some earnest-money?"
  • "If it would not put your honour out—"
  • "Here are two hundred pounds on account sir," added Phileas Fogg, turning t_ix, "if you would like to take advantage—"
  • "Thanks, sir; I was about to ask the favour."
  • "Very well. In half an hour we shall go on board."
  • "But poor Passepartout?" urged Aouda, who was much disturbed by the servant'_isappearance.
  • "I shall do all I can to find him," replied Phileas Fogg.
  • While Fix, in a feverish, nervous state, repaired to the pilot-boat, th_thers directed their course to the police-station at Hong Kong. Phileas Fog_here gave Passepartout's description, and left a sum of money to be spent i_he search for him. The same formalities having been gone through at th_rench consulate, and the palanquin having stopped at the hotel for th_uggage, which had been sent back there, they returned to the wharf.
  • It was now three o'clock; and pilot-boat No. 43, with its crew on board, an_ts provisions stored away, was ready for departure.
  • The Tankadere was a neat little craft of twenty tons, as gracefully built a_f she were a racing yacht. Her shining copper sheathing, her galvanised iron- work, her deck, white as ivory, betrayed the pride taken by John Bunsby i_aking her presentable. Her two masts leaned a trifle backward; she carrie_rigantine, foresail, storm-jib, and standing-jib, and was well rigged fo_unning before the wind; and she seemed capable of brisk speed, which, indeed, she had already proved by gaining several prizes in pilot-boat races. The cre_f the Tankadere was composed of John Bunsby, the master, and four hard_ariners, who were familiar with the Chinese seas. John Bunsby, himself, a ma_f forty-five or thereabouts, vigorous, sunburnt, with a sprightly expressio_f the eye, and energetic and self-reliant countenance, would have inspire_onfidence in the most timid.
  • Phileas Fogg and Aouda went on board, where they found Fix already installed.
  • Below deck was a square cabin, of which the walls bulged out in the form o_ots, above a circular divan; in the centre was a table provided with _winging lamp. The accommodation was confined, but neat.
  • "I am sorry to have nothing better to offer you," said Mr. Fogg to Fix, wh_owed without responding.
  • The detective had a feeling akin to humiliation in profiting by the kindnes_f Mr. Fogg.
  • "It's certain," thought he, "though rascal as he is, he is a polite one!"
  • The sails and the English flag were hoisted at ten minutes past three. Mr.
  • Fogg and Aouda, who were seated on deck, cast a last glance at the quay, i_he hope of espying Passepartout. Fix was not without his fears lest chanc_hould direct the steps of the unfortunate servant, whom he had so badl_reated, in this direction; in which case an explanation the reverse o_atisfactory to the detective must have ensued. But the Frenchman did no_ppear, and, without doubt, was still lying under the stupefying influence o_he opium.
  • John Bunsby, master, at length gave the order to start, and the Tankadere, taking the wind under her brigantine, foresail, and standing-jib, bounde_riskly forward over the waves.