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Chapter 15

  • **IN WHICH THE BAG OF BANKNOTES DISGORGES SOME THOUSANDS OF POUNDS MORE**
  • The train entered the station, and Passepartout jumping out first, wa_ollowed by Mr. Fogg, who assisted his fair companion to descend. Phileas Fog_ntended to proceed at once to the Hong Kong steamer, in order to get Aoud_omfortably settled for the voyage. He was unwilling to leave her while the_ere still on dangerous ground.
  • Just as he was leaving the station a policeman came up to him, and said, "Mr.
  • Phileas Fogg?"
  • "I am he."
  • "Is this man your servant?" added the policeman, pointing to Passepartout.
  • "Yes."
  • "Be so good, both of you, as to follow me."
  • Mr. Fogg betrayed no surprise whatever. The policeman was a representative o_he law, and law is sacred to an Englishman. Passepartout tried to reaso_bout the matter, but the policeman tapped him with his stick, and Mr. Fog_ade him a signal to obey.
  • "May this young lady go with us?" asked he.
  • "She may," replied the policeman.
  • Mr. Fogg, Aouda, and Passepartout were conducted to a palkigahri, a sort o_our-wheeled carriage, drawn by two horses, in which they took their place_nd were driven away. No one spoke during the twenty minutes which elapse_efore they reached their destination. They first passed through the "blac_own," with its narrow streets, its miserable, dirty huts, and squali_opulation; then through the "European town," which presented a relief in it_right brick mansions, shaded by coconut-trees and bristling with masts, where, although it was early morning, elegantly dressed horsemen and handsom_quipages were passing back and forth.
  • The carriage stopped before a modest-looking house, which, however, did no_ave the appearance of a private mansion. The policeman having requested hi_risoners for so, truly, they might be called-to descend, conducted them int_ room with barred windows, and said: "You will appear before Judge Obadiah a_alf-past eight."
  • He then retired, and closed the door.
  • "Why, we are prisoners!" exclaimed Passepartout, falling into a chair.
  • Aouda, with an emotion she tried to conceal, said to Mr. Fogg: "Sir, you mus_eave me to my fate! It is on my account that you receive this treatment, i_s for having saved me!"
  • Phileas Fogg contented himself with saying that it was impossible. It wa_uite unlikely that he should be arrested for preventing a suttee. Th_omplainants would not dare present themselves with such a charge. There wa_ome mistake. Moreover, he would not, in any event, abandon Aouda, but woul_scort her to Hong Kong.
  • "But the steamer leaves at noon!" observed Passepartout, nervously.
  • "We shall be on board by noon," replied his master, placidly.
  • It was said so positively that Passepartout could not help muttering t_imself, "Parbleu that's certain! Before noon we shall be on board." But h_as by no means reassured.
  • At half-past eight the door opened, the policeman appeared, and, requestin_hem to follow him, led the way to an adjoining hall. It was evidently _ourt-room, and a crowd of Europeans and natives already occupied the rear o_he apartment.
  • Mr. Fogg and his two companions took their places on a bench opposite th_esks of the magistrate and his clerk. Immediately after, Judge Obadiah, _at, round man, followed by the clerk, entered. He proceeded to take down _ig which was hanging on a nail, and put it hurriedly on his head.
  • "The first case," said he. Then, putting his hand to his head, he exclaimed,
  • "Heh! This is not my wig!"
  • "No, your worship," returned the clerk, "it is mine."
  • "My dear Mr. Oysterpuff, how can a judge give a wise sentence in a clerk'_ig?"
  • The wigs were exchanged.
  • Passepartout was getting nervous, for the hands on the face of the big cloc_ver the judge seemed to go around with terrible rapidity.
  • "The first case," repeated Judge Obadiah.
  • "Phileas Fogg?" demanded Oysterpuff.
  • "I am here," replied Mr. Fogg.
  • "Passepartout?"
  • "Present," responded Passepartout.
  • "Good," said the judge. "You have been looked for, prisoners, for two days o_he trains from Bombay."
  • "But of what are we accused?" asked Passepartout, impatiently.
  • "You are about to be informed."
  • "I am an English subject, sir," said Mr. Fogg, "and I have the right—"
  • "Have you been ill-treated?"
  • "Not at all."
  • "Very well; let the complainants come in."
  • A door was swung open by order of the judge, and three Indian priests entered.
  • "That's it," muttered Passepartout; "these are the rogues who were going t_urn our young lady."
  • The priests took their places in front of the judge, and the clerk proceede_o read in a loud voice a complaint of sacrilege against Phileas Fogg and hi_ervant, who were accused of having violated a place held consecrated by th_rahmin religion.
  • "You hear the charge?" asked the judge.
  • "Yes, sir," replied Mr. Fogg, consulting his watch, "and I admit it."
  • "You admit it?"
  • "I admit it, and I wish to hear these priests admit, in their turn, what the_ere going to do at the pagoda of Pillaji."
  • The priests looked at each other; they did not seem to understand what wa_aid.
  • "Yes," cried Passepartout, warmly; "at the pagoda of Pillaji, where they wer_n the point of burning their victim."
  • The judge stared with astonishment, and the priests were stupefied.
  • "What victim?" said Judge Obadiah. "Burn whom? In Bombay itself?"
  • "Bombay?" cried Passepartout.
  • "Certainly. We are not talking of the pagoda of Pillaji, but of the pagoda o_alabar Hill, at Bombay."
  • "And as a proof," added the clerk, "here are the desecrator's very shoes, which he left behind him."
  • Whereupon he placed a pair of shoes on his desk.
  • "My shoes!" cried Passepartout, in his surprise permitting this impruden_xclamation to escape him.
  • The confusion of master and man, who had quite forgotten the affair at Bombay, for which they were now detained at Calcutta, may be imagined.
  • Fix the detective, had foreseen the advantage which Passepartout's escapad_ave him, and, delaying his departure for twelve hours, had consulted th_riests of Malabar Hill. Knowing that the English authorities dealt ver_everely with this kind of misdemeanour, he promised them a goodly sum i_amages, and sent them forward to Calcutta by the next train. Owing to th_elay caused by the rescue of the young widow, Fix and the priests reached th_ndian capital before Mr. Fogg and his servant, the magistrates having bee_lready warned by a dispatch to arrest them should they arrive. Fix'_isappointment when he learned that Phileas Fogg had not made his appearanc_n Calcutta may be imagined. He made up his mind that the robber had stoppe_omewhere on the route and taken refuge in the southern provinces. For twenty- four hours Fix watched the station with feverish anxiety; at last he wa_ewarded by seeing Mr. Fogg and Passepartout arrive, accompanied by a youn_oman, whose presence he was wholly at a loss to explain. He hastened for _oliceman; and this was how the party came to be arrested and brought befor_udge Obadiah.
  • Had Passepartout been a little less preoccupied, he would have espied th_etective ensconced in a corner of the court-room, watching the proceeding_ith an interest easily understood; for the warrant had failed to reach him a_alcutta, as it had done at Bombay and Suez.
  • Judge Obadiah had unfortunately caught Passepartout's rash exclamation, whic_he poor fellow would have given the world to recall.
  • "The facts are admitted?" asked the judge.
  • "Admitted," replied Mr. Fogg, coldly.
  • "Inasmuch," resumed the judge, "as the English law protects equally an_ternly the religions of the Indian people, and as the man Passepartout ha_dmitted that he violated the sacred pagoda of Malabar Hill, at Bombay, on th_0th of October, I condemn the said Passepartout to imprisonment for fiftee_ays and a fine of three hundred pounds."
  • "Three hundred pounds!" cried Passepartout, startled at the largeness of th_um.
  • "Silence!" shouted the constable.
  • "And inasmuch," continued the judge, "as it is not proved that the act was no_one by the connivance of the master with the servant, and as the master i_ny case must be held responsible for the acts of his paid servant, I condem_hileas Fogg to a week's imprisonment and a fine of one hundred and fift_ounds."
  • Fix rubbed his hands softly with satisfaction; if Phileas Fogg could b_etained in Calcutta a week, it would be more than time for the warrant t_rrive. Passepartout was stupefied. This sentence ruined his master. A wage_f twenty thousand pounds lost, because he, like a precious fool, had gon_nto that abominable pagoda!
  • Phileas Fogg, as self-composed as if the judgment did not in the least concer_im, did not even lift his eyebrows while it was being pronounced. Just as th_lerk was calling the next case, he rose, and said, "I offer bail."
  • "You have that right," returned the judge.
  • Fix's blood ran cold, but he resumed his composure when he heard the judg_nnounce that the bail required for each prisoner would be one thousan_ounds.
  • "I will pay it at once," said Mr. Fogg, taking a roll of bank-bills from th_arpet-bag, which Passepartout had by him, and placing them on the clerk'_esk.
  • "This sum will be restored to you upon your release from prison," said th_udge. "Meanwhile, you are liberated on bail."
  • "Come!" said Phileas Fogg to his servant.
  • "But let them at least give me back my shoes!" cried Passepartout angrily.
  • "Ah, these are pretty dear shoes!" he muttered, as they were handed to him.
  • "More than a thousand pounds apiece; besides, they pinch my feet."
  • Mr. Fogg, offering his arm to Aouda, then departed, followed by th_restfallen Passepartout. Fix still nourished hopes that the robber would not, after all, leave the two thousand pounds behind him, but would decide to serv_ut his week in jail, and issued forth on Mr. Fogg's traces. That gentlema_ook a carriage, and the party were soon landed on one of the quays.
  • The Rangoon was moored half a mile off in the harbour, its signal of departur_oisted at the mast-head. Eleven o'clock was striking; Mr. Fogg was an hour i_dvance of time. Fix saw them leave the carriage and push off in a boat fo_he steamer, and stamped his feet with disappointment.
  • "The rascal is off, after all!" he exclaimed. "Two thousand pounds sacrificed!
  • He's as prodigal as a thief! I'll follow him to the end of the world i_ecessary; but, at the rate he is going on, the stolen money will soon b_xhausted."
  • The detective was not far wrong in making this conjecture. Since leavin_ondon, what with travelling expenses, bribes, the purchase of the elephant, bails, and fines, Mr. Fogg had already spent more than five thousand pounds o_he way, and the percentage of the sum recovered from the bank robber promise_o the detectives, was rapidly diminishing.